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firbikrhd1
02-19-2015, 11:25 AM
I did a search but didn't find any previousl post of this so I thought I would post a link. Quite an engine!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZVuKp5M3de8#t=101

Please excuse the post if it has already been added and I somehow missed it.

Willy
02-19-2015, 12:20 PM
Thanks for posting.
Incredible craftsmanship and patience. Over 2500 hours of labor, I could never stay focused that long. My hat's off to those that can do this type of work.

Weston Bye
02-19-2015, 12:36 PM
While I certainly share Willy's sentiments, I reserve some small dissapointment and suppose that it would be too much to ask to see such marvels of craftsmanship running as true internal combustion engines rather than on "just" compressed air.

Having seen lesser examples running on gasoline at NAMES, I know it is possible.

aostling
02-19-2015, 04:54 PM
The model is impressive, but it does beg the question: what possible advantage is there in an engine having 32 cylinders?

CarlByrns
02-19-2015, 05:16 PM
While I certainly share Willy's sentiments, I reserve some small dissapointment and suppose that it would be too much to ask to see such marvels of craftsmanship running as true internal combustion engines rather than on "just" compressed air.

Having seen lesser examples running on gasoline at NAMES, I know it is possible.

That's a lot of jugs in a small space. I doubt a fuel-burning example could run for very long without overheating- either air or liquid cooled.

boslab
02-19-2015, 07:31 PM
The model is impressive, but it does beg the question: what possible advantage is there in an engine having 32 cylinders?
I was also wondering that, but is spend a lot of time wondering.
Also it seems that it is a very fancy air motor, not an engine at all, I agree, the best have carbs, ignition and all that, and smoke comes out the exhaust, much nicer, however it is a skilled bit of metalwork, I couldn't do it, or could in a lot more time as it may be!
Dainty little pistons, but no rings, imagine making them!
Mark

JCHannum
02-19-2015, 08:37 PM
It does take quite a bit of skill and patience to build such an engine. If you look at his other videos, he has also built a V-12, a W-18 and a radial 10. It appears the engines all use a variation of the same modules for the cylinder jugs, heads and share other common components such as pistons, valve gear and such.

Willy
02-19-2015, 09:18 PM
While I certainly share Willy's sentiments, I reserve some small dissapointment and suppose that it would be too much to ask to see such marvels of craftsmanship running as true internal combustion engines rather than on "just" compressed air.

Having seen lesser examples running on gasoline at NAMES, I know it is possible.

I believe a big reason that this engine is not an actual runner has to do with scale. With a total cylinder displacement of only 47 cc and 32 cylinders fuel and ignition systems become very hard pressed to function correctly. Successfully building those components alone would would be a great technological challenge. Think about the size of vaporized fuel droplets in a cylinder that displaces less than 1.5 cc. Then imagine building a spark plug that is small enough to fit the tiny cylinder head and yet still reliably light a mixture with what to it must seem huge blobs of gasoline.

I don't believe this engine is a copy of an actual engine as I don't recognize it, but I may be wrong. The engine has no means of cooling so either he took liberties with an existing design or he designed it himself, which would be my first guess.
A considerable achievement by itself never mind the actual process of building each of the hundreds of carefully machined components.



The model is impressive, but it does beg the question: what possible advantage is there in an engine having 32 cylinders?

I know there are a few engines with 32 or more cylinders but they are rare and specialized. The "normal" limit seems to be 12- 18 cylinders for large industrial/ship engines. Engine design is a very broad subject that covers many aspects of just about every engineering discipline.

In the most simple of terms, smaller cylinders for a given displacement are more efficient overall than a larger cylinder of equal displacement. Many factors come into the equation, things like reciprocating mass, piston speed, bearing surface speeds,surface to volume ratios and the dynamics of air flow and thermal efficiency are just a few of the aspects that affect an engine's design.
Hopefully my answer is not too brief. Although your question seems on the surface to be a simple one, it would take a very long and detailed answer to adequately cover all that a truly proper answer would entail.

JCHannum
02-19-2015, 09:41 PM
For true miniature model engineering, it is difficult to surpass Jerry Keiffer's work. Scroll down to see the details of the working 1/8 scale Harley Davidison he is building;

http://www.craftsmanshipmuseum.com/Kieffer4.htm

loose nut
02-20-2015, 09:52 AM
The model is impressive, but it does beg the question: what possible advantage is there in an engine having 32 cylinders?

'cause 31 cylinders wouldn't run very well.:D