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Menessis
02-19-2015, 07:49 PM
Check it out. I found it at a local flea market. A Sandvik R-8 mill. Seemed like something I should have.

http://i835.photobucket.com/albums/zz279/NewMenessis/SandVik_01_zps482f8678.jpg

The inserts are marked TF1000. My Rockwell 21-100 is only 1/2 hp I believe. But I hope it will be of some use.

Menessis

sarge41
02-19-2015, 07:54 PM
Menessis: What is the nominal dia. (cut dia.). It looks to be maybe 1 1/4"? May make your 1/2 hp. grunt. Don't forget to keep the speed up where it should be. Good luck.
Sarge

Menessis
02-19-2015, 08:54 PM
I just spent some time trying to see what I can learn about inserts. Not very productive! :(

It's 1 1/2" dia.

Menessis

PixMan
02-19-2015, 08:56 PM
You should do OK with it. I ran far larger cutters than that on my 1HP Bridgport for years before I get the 2HP Taiwanese version, no problem.

Since a TPG432 (or smaller TPG321?) insert will break the tips easy enough when it stalls, the cutter body itself will survive. Just be ready for it to "hammer" your spindle a bit.

So what do you need to know about inserts?

Menessis
02-19-2015, 09:16 PM
Well like everything else it seems, I don't know anything about them. I was looking for some sort of chart that would explain what all the letters and numbers mean. If they are suitable for aluminum?

As long as I'm not trying to cut too much at a time I would assume I would be ok.

Menessis

Rosco-P
02-19-2015, 09:34 PM
Well like everything else it seems, I don't know anything about them. I was looking for some sort of chart that would explain what all the letters and numbers mean. If they are suitable for aluminum?

As long as I'm not trying to cut too much at a time I would assume I would be ok.

Menessis

Enco or other machinery supply/machine shop catalogs usually have a page or two devoted to insert decoding and selection. Go onto use-enco.com and request a free catalog. Here's a start:
http://www.carbidedepot.com/formulas-insert-d.htm

flylo
02-19-2015, 10:22 PM
I think the old motors have twice the power of a new rated motor.

PixMan
02-19-2015, 11:13 PM
Just about any grade of carbide will be fine for aluminum, though coated ones like the ones it came with may get "built up edge" from aluminum sticking to them. All I can say is run them at your maximum RPM.

Those pages on the :technical Resources" part of CarbideDepot's website is pretty good at explaining carbide insert terminology. Feel free to ask me anything about them as well, I am well-practiced with insert terms, technology and application. I make no claims to be "the expert", but do OK.

kendall
02-19-2015, 11:21 PM
I think the old motors have twice the power of a new rated motor.

I may be way off base, but I've always attributed it to the old motors having more torque simply because of their diameter.
My old Delta table saw had a 2hp motor,I sold it when I moved, then replaced it with a newer model that also had a 2hp motor, That was only half the size. I stalled that one out so many times it was crazy. Running a dado required a slow easy feed with the new motor, while the old motor would handle any dado size in whatever wood I was using as fast as I felt like feeding it
Since then I've noticed that the old 'Fat' motors do not stall as easily as the newer skinny motors of the same HP/amp ratings. On the table saw, I thought of going to a 3hp, but didn't have the wires run to handle it.
I have a couple of old 1/2 horse motors that are huge, they will outwork nearly all of the new baby sized 3/4 horse motors I have, and still feel cool after a 2-3 hour run, while the newer ones are too hot to touch.

38_Cal
02-19-2015, 11:34 PM
Let me be the first to tell you that YOU SUCK! Good job scarfing that up!

Menessis
02-19-2015, 11:46 PM
Hey Rosco thats just what I was looking for. Thanks

Menessis

chipmaker4130
02-20-2015, 12:48 AM
A few decades ago, a popular company started advertising motors as X hp (develops X horsepower). The first number (X) was the actual hp rating, and the second one was hp calculated by current draw as the motor stalled under load. They didn't bother to tell you that the motor smoked shortly after reaching that 'developed' hp point. That lasted a very few years and then competitors started leaving out the true hp and listed only the pre-smoke value. If you can find a 'running' hp value you'll get what you expect.

Then there is 'treadmill' hp. Due to the striding load on a treadmill, a lot of manufacturers will rate a motor almost double what the continuous load rating would be.

Rosco-P
02-20-2015, 09:37 AM
A few decades ago, a popular company started advertising motors as X hp (develops X horsepower). The first number (X) was the actual hp rating, and the second one was hp calculated by current draw as the motor stalled under load. They didn't bother to tell you that the motor smoked shortly after reaching that 'developed' hp point. That lasted a very few years and then competitors started leaving out the true hp and listed only the pre-smoke value. If you can find a 'running' hp value you'll get what you expect.

Then there is 'treadmill' hp. Due to the striding load on a treadmill, a lot of manufacturers will rate a motor almost double what the continuous load rating would be.

Like the hp ratings on shop vacuums. 5hp out of a motor the size of a softball, really?

Black_Moons
02-20-2015, 05:05 PM
Protip, Remove all but 1 insert from it and use it as a flycutter! I doubt you have the hp to use all 3 inserts on anything more then a finishing pass.

Once you knock the tip off a few inserts, grind the tip back so it won't ever contact the work and put them back on the head to balance the head. (Doubt you will notice the difference but it always seems better to make spinning things balanced)