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Black Forest
02-25-2015, 04:16 PM
I want to paint my shop. For obvious reasons I don't think I should spray paint. Do any of you have experience with a power roller?

lakeside53
02-25-2015, 05:29 PM
I have... a lot. My unit is $500 Graco airless sprayer that takes 5 gallon paint buckets. Simple conversion to roller. Squeeze trigger and the paint flows to the inside of the roller and out though perforations to the wool. Works very well - I can paint an entire room without stopping. Makes for keeping a 'wet edge" easy, and the application is very even. Soooo good for ceilings.. no bending and rewetting the roller. Few if any drips.

Black Forest
02-25-2015, 05:42 PM
I have... a lot. My unit is $500 Graco airless sprayer that takes 5 gallon paint buckets. Simple conversion to roller. Squeeze trigger and the paint flows to the inside of the roller and out though perforations to the wool. Works very well - I can paint an entire room without stopping. Makes for keeping a 'wet edge" easy, and the application is very even. Soooo good for ceilings.. no bending and rewetting the roller. Few if any drips.

What roller attachment do you have? Is it a quick disconnect?

vpt
02-25-2015, 05:58 PM
Inside or out, drywall, metal, and stuff?

lakeside53
02-25-2015, 05:59 PM
I'd have to go look - not sure if I did or not. It has a screw on connection anyhow and doesn't take take more then a few seconds to undo. Like all airless sprayers, cleaning take a while though.

Mine's like this : http://www.ebay.com/itm/like/271284516261

Gary Paine
02-25-2015, 06:25 PM
drop cloths -- EVERYWHERE.

oldtiffie
02-25-2015, 06:34 PM
Good product - but you will still need a brush to get good edges and into some corners where the roller won't/can't go.

It is a truism that with a roller or a spray the paint is "painted on(to)" the job whereas paint applied with a brush is "painted in(to)" the job.

But both methods are very effective.

"Cutting into" as well as "feather edging" need a brush.

oldtiffie
02-25-2015, 08:58 PM
The quality of the finished job is in large part (entirely?) due to the quality of the preparation and application.

That's mainly/all "wrist, elbow and shoulder work - and that's from the floor its worse/harder from a ladder or plank.

The Artful Bodger
02-25-2015, 09:19 PM
Detailed how to painting a room..
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T9MAmWnOznI

J Harp
02-25-2015, 09:25 PM
Let your wife paint it. Women love to come up with painting projects, I hate painting.

oldtiffie
02-25-2015, 09:57 PM
Why just "let" her and so give her the option of refusal?

Be brave - just make her - and you be the overseer/supervisor.

Perhaps she will (still?) love you (and thank you) afterwards (you hope?).

J Tiers
02-26-2015, 12:56 AM
The only experience I have with the powered "pump" roller system is with a US version, a Wagner.

Worst piece of crap I have had the displeasure of using. I *gave* the entire (not cheap) thing away. It was that bad, IMO, I couldn't take money for it.

The thing was "made of drips".... if it wasn't dripping, it was too dry to put on a coat. I can roller paint very well, but not with that POS.


Given that your shop is big, and high, do you really want to paint the whole thing with a roller? As Tiffie pointed out, you will still be up on a ladder etc doing the corners and edges.

The search has been trying to find the post with picture of your shop for 15 minutes now, no luck. But as I recall it doesn't look so bad as it is.

MrFluffy
02-26-2015, 03:44 AM
Ive got one of the earlex pumped roller systems that run off batteries, and for all that its ok albeit a bit prone to dripping when doing overhead and a pain to clean properly afterwards. Its certainly quicker than stopping to dip the roller in a tray once its going anyway and with a long handle it saves all that ladder business apart from edging in.
But my workshop is stone walls and irregular surfaces, its not like a finished plaster wall in the house, and I found rollering left it too thin anyway, so I just slopped it on with a assortment of large and small brushes in the end as the end game was just white walls for better reflection of light rather than looking pretty.

oldtiffie
02-26-2015, 06:08 AM
Why not just face up to it - its not worth the effort and trouble.

Get in a good "Pro" (Contract) painters team.

They will eat that job.

Abner
02-26-2015, 07:26 AM
OK, am I the only one shocked and disappointed by this thread?
I expected a picture of young "horse riders" in his shop painting.

Black Forest
02-26-2015, 07:30 AM
OK, am I the only one shocked and disappointed by this thread?
I expected a picture of young "horse riders" in his shop painting.

Be patient Grasshopper. My Swiss sheep are cleaning the shop as we speak!

Black Forest
02-26-2015, 07:31 AM
Maybe I should just pour white paint all over my real sheep and then have my Border Collies chase them around the shop perimeter. They could run up the walls if they go fast enough.

MrFluffy
02-26-2015, 07:36 AM
You could adapt your shearing machine to dip them in a vat of paint upside down for better coverage too!

Abner
02-26-2015, 07:41 AM
Be patient Grasshopper. My Swiss sheep are cleaning the shop as we speak!

If you can convince them to paint your shop to ride a horse I will eat my hat, no I won't, but I will be very much impressed.

vpt
02-26-2015, 07:53 AM
I'd use a spray gun, fast and easy.

dian
02-26-2015, 11:02 AM
be shure to clean the surfaces with amonia first (mask). buy the most expensive paint you can get (you will nor regret). then use a good brush. (im assuming we are not talking about painting metal or wood.)

oh, and a lot of water neened to get amonia off. any stains you still need to isolate. three layers will make it really white. not so much lightning needed.

anyways, thats what i did.

Paul Alciatore
02-26-2015, 02:33 PM
Two possibilities:

1. You are not married. And never have been.

2. You are trying to get the rest of us in a LOT of trouble.




Why just "let" her and so give her the option of refusal?

Be brave - just make her - and you be the overseer/supervisor.

Perhaps she will (still?) love you (and thank you) afterwards (you hope?).

oldtiffie
02-26-2015, 06:33 PM
Unless you've done a fair bit of this recently you are going to have "sore spots" in places you never knew you had and you will soon be wishing you'd never got into this mess and wondering who a good contractor is.

It is highly likely that your estimate of time and costs etc. will be "way under" what is really needed.

Do you really need to "do it" yourself or just want to see it done (by "others")?

Who is going to move any machines etc. that need to be moved out and back?

You may well find out what "painting yourself into a corner" really means.

oldtiffie
02-26-2015, 06:36 PM
Originally Posted by oldtiffie View Post

Why just "let" her and so give her the option of refusal?

Be brave - just make her - and you be the overseer/supervisor.

Perhaps she will (still?) love you (and thank you) afterwards (you hope?).


Two possibilities:

1. You are not married. And never have been.

2. You are trying to get the rest of us in a LOT of trouble.

I am married alright - well and truly and very happily too - 55 years.

I am quite sure that many here can get themselves into any amount of trouble with no help or encouragement from me.

boslab
02-26-2015, 07:04 PM
I tried using masonry paint, the stuff for outside, covers in 1 coat I discovered.
Mark

Abner
02-26-2015, 07:09 PM
I'm thinking you have asked the wrong crowd.
Here is the gal you should be getting advice from.
As a big benefit she likes power tools. Not bad looking either.

http://www.marthastewart.com/

lakeside53
02-26-2015, 07:57 PM
Let BF paint just paint HIS shop however he wants :)!

oldtiffie
02-26-2015, 08:05 PM
Oops.

Sorry - I omitted to post the links to "painting yourself into a corner" out.

Here they are:

https://www.google.com.au/search?q=painting+yourself+into+a+corner&biw=1536&bih=732&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=-MHvVNegJOG_mAWrn4KABQ&sqi=2&ved=0CCsQsAQ

https://www.google.com.au/?gws_rd=ssl#q=painting+yourself+into+a+corner

Have a nice day.

J Tiers
02-26-2015, 08:06 PM
Let BF paint just paint HIS shop however he wants :)!

DID he or did he NOT... ASK us for advice?

If he does not know by now what happens if you do that...............

lakeside53
02-26-2015, 08:20 PM
He asked about a power roller. As usual around here he's getting martial advice and about how hard it is or why he should or shouldn't paint it at all. Soon someone will be telling him the color. :)

oldtiffie
02-26-2015, 08:26 PM
He asked about a power roller. As usual around here he's getting martial advice and about how hard it is or why he should or shouldn't paint it at all. Soon someone will be telling him the color. :)


I expect that she (and his daughters?) will - if she/they hasn't already.

J Tiers
02-26-2015, 09:53 PM
He asked about a power roller. As usual around here he's getting martial advice and about how hard it is or why he should or shouldn't paint it at all. Soon someone will be telling him the color. :)

Yeah, SO?

Didn't I say something about he should know what happens? So should you! :D

lakeside53
02-26-2015, 09:58 PM
Ha. Some posters are assuming he doesn't know what end of a paint brush to hold! For all we know he's and expert painter, but just wants to know about a power roller.

oldtiffie
02-27-2015, 12:08 AM
I wish BF all the luck and success that he wants.

The Artful Bodger
02-27-2015, 12:15 AM
BF, I have just a little experience with a power roller. It was a Wagner pressure canister model where one places the open paint can in the canister which becomes pressurised by a small electric air pump and forces the paint to the roller. I used it when we had to paint a two storey concrete block house and as you likely know concrete blocks suck paint.

Scaffolding was necessary but not near as much as had I used regular paint rollers, the job went very quickly ( 3 coats) and there were few drips to be seen. I think a good power roller is just the bee's knees for big, long reach, jobs and are not really all that difficult to clean.

John

Black Forest
02-27-2015, 01:29 AM
Thank you all for the advice. Don't worry about OldStiffie, he can't help it that he has no concept of actually giving relevant advice. It is just his nature to post irrelevant information.
And I am sure he has been happily married for many years. It just surprises me that a blow-up latex doll would last so long. Good on you Oldstiffie.

Actually I am an expert painter but only in the metal and machinery area. Interior painting and wood I have always avoided whenever possible. And yes I was seeking advice on a power roller. Thank you all for the feedback. I did run into a problem with the wife though. She caught wind of my intentions to paint my shop and with her big beautiful eyes batting away very nicely mentioned that she knows how much my shop means to me. So she would be willing to let me perfect my skills at interior painting inside the house. That she would be willing to let me paint all the rooms, bathrooms and hallways. What a gal!

I could not find a professional power roller anywhere close to me that I could rent or buy. I would at least want to see one work before investing a lot of money so I went to the local big box store and bought one of the Wagner power rollers. Definitely a piece of junk as far as construction quality. BUT after re-engineering it it works really well. First I had to "tune" the pump. The hose for the peristalic pump was too long and had a pinch in it that restricted the paint flow. Then the sealing arrangement for the roller leaked like a sieve. A simple O-ring placed over the metal tube that delivers the paint to the roller fixed the leaking perfectly. I put a venturi feed tube for soap inline for the cleaning hose attachment so I could use soap to achieve a very good clean out of the pump and hoses. Now the unit paints really well with no troubles at all. I painted five gallons of quite thick interior paint with it so far and it actually made the job fun. Now I will let others do the painting in the house!

Black Forest
02-27-2015, 07:30 AM
Here is a picture of the pinch in the tube inside the pump. I cut off 6mm and the pump functions very good now.
http://i853.photobucket.com/albums/ab91/burnandreturn/paint%20pump%20copy_zpsi8mn03hk.jpg (http://s853.photobucket.com/user/burnandreturn/media/paint%20pump%20copy_zpsi8mn03hk.jpg.html)

The Artful Bodger
02-27-2015, 02:03 PM
Thanks BF, I think that pump is just what I need as a coolant pump on my cold saw!

Black Forest
02-27-2015, 02:04 PM
Thanks BF, I think that pump is just what I need as a coolant pump on my cold saw!

do you want me to post all the parts of the pump?

lakeside53
02-27-2015, 02:47 PM
They are really simple to make. Pity you weren't local.. I have a bunch from a chemical lab.

The Artful Bodger
02-27-2015, 09:18 PM
Thanks, yes I think I could make one easy enough. There might even be some soft rubber hose in my stash of stuff that might come in handy one day.

oldtiffie
02-27-2015, 09:55 PM
http://s853.photobucket.com/user/burnandreturn/media/paint%20pump%20copy_zpsi8mn03hk.jpg.html


Thanks BF, I think that pump is just what I need as a coolant pump on my cold saw!

AB.

You can get those pumps at many "Speed" and "Auto" shops (at least here in OZ anyway) as part of a power-drill driven sump and the like extraction pump.

I have one (somewhere) and it works juts finer on a variable speed and reversible drill.

As soon as I saw BF's post with the pic of it in it I knew what it was (for).

Thanks BF.

Best of luck AB.

firbikrhd1
02-27-2015, 10:25 PM
I hate painting! I bought a good sprayer for house paint years ago, tried to use it a number of times and found it not to be worth the trouble. By the time I got tips sorted out (which to use for what paint) and got around to painting then spent the time cleaning the sprayer, including the prep work of masking, spray shields etc. I really didn't save any time at all and truthfully I don't believe I got as good a job as if done with a roller. When you paint with a roller or a brush you get a slightly thicker coat and the paint is, "pressed", for lack of a better word, into the pores of the surface not just sitting on top.
My wife and I recently built a new home and painted it ourselves to save money. We're still happily married, so it all worked out OK. We bought a large roller for an 18" roller, handle and tray plus a regular size and small roller. We cut in first with brushes and were able to paint 98% with rollers. This is a fairly large house, with vaulted ceilings in the great room. we used about 65 gallons of paint including primer. I still hate painting but in my opinion the roller is the way to go, especially if you get the 18 incher.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7X-hk_BpKSM

J Tiers
02-27-2015, 10:45 PM
..........so I went to the local big box store and bought one of the Wagner power rollers. Definitely a piece of junk as far as construction quality. BUT after re-engineering it it works really well.

The one I had did not have such a good pump, in fact it was hand pumped, as I recall. It leaked everywhere, clogged, and the (at that time) very expensive rollers did actually not let paint through very well.

But that must have been 20 years ago, maybe more. Apparently they have learned something.

oldtiffie
02-28-2015, 02:00 AM
http://s853.photobucket.com/user/burnandreturn/media/paint%20pump%20copy_zpsi8mn03hk.jpg.html

AB.

You can get those pumps at many "Speed" and "Auto" shops (at least here in OZ anyway) as part of a power-drill driven sump and the like extraction pump.

I have one (somewhere) and it works juts finer on a variable speed and reversible drill.

As soon as I saw BF's post with the pic of it in it I knew what it was (for).

Thanks BF.

Best of luck AB.



Here are a couple of pics of 43mm clamping spigots on German (Bosch and Metabo) drills. Those spigots are pretty well universal in Europe and are made for standard clamps etc.

Very handy.

http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Med_Speed_Spindles/Metabo_drill1.jpg

http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Med_Speed_Spindles/Metabo_drill3.jpg

http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Med_Speed_Spindles/Proxxon_mill3.jpg

http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Med_Speed_Spindles/Proxxon_mill1.jpg

http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Med_Speed_Spindles/Proxxon_mill9.jpg

etc. etc.

The drill and clamp etc. can be bolted to a machine table or what ever you fancy.

The 20mm spigot on the smaller Proxxon die grinder (from LittleMachineShop.com - USA) works just the same.

http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Med_Speed_Spindles/Proxxon_small1.jpg