PDA

View Full Version : E-Clip insertion tool



brian Rupnow
02-26-2015, 03:02 PM
Who has one, what does it look like, and how well does it work? An e-clip is an external retaining ring that snaps into a groove around a shaft and does not have the little holes that snap rings have for snap ring pliers. I went to my local "nuts and bolts" place and asked about e-clip insertion tools, to work with 1/8" and 3/16" and 1/4" shafts/e-clips. The e-clips are fairly inexpensive, but each different size requires a different size of insertion tool and they cost $57 each. Is the insertion tool something I could make, or does it have a tiny, tiny, slot that the e-clip fits into---if so I couldn't machine that.---Brian

Doozer
02-26-2015, 03:24 PM
Sorry, it has to be made in a factory.

-D

JRouche
02-26-2015, 03:29 PM
http://www.ebay.com/itm/NEIKO-E-clip-remover-and-installer-set-free-shipping-in-usa-/181661794106?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2a4be2ff3a

http://i1183.photobucket.com/albums/x461/_GLE_/HSM/eclip_zps7z2fvdjd.jpg (http://s1183.photobucket.com/user/_GLE_/media/HSM/eclip_zps7z2fvdjd.jpg.html)

brian Rupnow
02-26-2015, 03:35 PM
JRouche--That's a great price!! Unfortunately it doesn't do 1/8" and 3/16" shaft sizes.---Brian

Rosco-P
02-26-2015, 04:10 PM
Would have suggested a tool made by Milbar, it's what I use, but they are out of biz. Thought about Jensen Tools, no good, they've been bought by Stanley.

Did find this: http://www.duratrax.com/accessories/tools/dtxr1107.html but it's all metric.

brian Rupnow
02-26-2015, 04:13 PM
RoscoP---Yes, I found that tool as well, and it looks like it would be great, except for the fact that it is all metric. I have been searching for an hour and I can't find anyone who sells a tool like that in imperial fractional inch sizes.

Jon Heron
02-26-2015, 04:16 PM
I have always used needle nose pliers, one size fits all ;)
Cheers,
Jon

RWO
02-26-2015, 04:43 PM
A hemostat works great and fits all the normal sizes. Thin the nose on a grinder if need be.

RWO

boslab
02-26-2015, 06:58 PM
I manage to loose 35mm circlips, e clips are making a nest somewhere, ping oh **** clips are the new official designation, they have other less eloquent names too
Mark

lakeside53
02-26-2015, 08:00 PM
I guess I've always been lucky - no special tool required. But now I know, nothing will ever go on again. lol.

Bob Fisher
02-26-2015, 08:37 PM
McMaster Carr has them for about $25. Like others I use needle nose pliers, most often I just put them on by hand. Modern clock movements use a lot of pretty small ones.

v860rich
02-26-2015, 10:01 PM
Here's a link to one similar to the one I use, mine is a Williams but I can't find anything by searching under the Williams brand.
I think Williams has been bought out by another tool company or folded.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Jonard-CS-1022-Clip-Setter-for-E-and-C-Clip-6-3-4-Length-x-17-64-Width-x-1-16-/201161864184

THANX RICH

J Harp
02-26-2015, 10:40 PM
Brian,

After looking at the one linked by v860rich, I think you could make one out of some steel strapping. I'll leave the design to you.

Video Man
02-26-2015, 11:09 PM
Somewhere in my checkered past I saw such a tool, which appeared to be nothing more than a piece of nearly - flattened tubing, presumably with a rivet or weld or something to provide a stop at the appropriate depth, and attached to a short handle...

duckman
02-26-2015, 11:12 PM
Brian before trying to insert the jesus clip (thats what we call them) put a small neodium (sp) magnet on it so when it slip's it won't go flying.

Black_Moons
02-27-2015, 01:28 AM
Flathead screwdriver to pry them off, needle nose plyers to remove them.

For the REALLY tiny ones on carb needles, I use a flat surface to remove them (and cover the E clip to keep it from flying off with my hand), and a flat surface to install them. Just rest the clip in the groove and press against flat surface.

Circlip
02-27-2015, 07:11 AM
http://www.duratrax.com/accessories/tools/dtxr1107.html

Used to make individual assembly tools in a previous life for customer assembly lines. Looking at open end of tool, profile is a flat bottomed dovetail slot.

Regards Ian.

Seastar
02-27-2015, 08:16 AM
The flattened tube with a stop rivit sounds like a winner now that I know that I have been doing it wrong with needle nose pliers and a screwdriver.
Bill

brian Rupnow
02-27-2015, 01:48 PM
Follow up--My "nuts and bolts" store wanted $57 each for the 3 different tools required to do 1/8" and 3/16" and 1/4" e-clips. My tooling supplier in Barrie wanted $43 each for the same thing. A company called SAE Products in Florida or South Carolina (can't remember which) wanted $35 American (which is roughly $40 Canadian) for the same thing, plus whatever for shipping. I guess I will continue to use my jacknife and needle nosed pliers.---Brian

Black Forest
02-27-2015, 02:08 PM
will one of you post a picture or a link to what the clip looks like? The only one I know of are the ones with a hole in each side of a horseshoe shaped snap ring.

Rosco-P
02-27-2015, 03:04 PM
These: http://www.sscirclip.com/e-clip-1276002.html

Euph0ny
02-27-2015, 03:13 PM
will one of you post a picture or a link to what the clip looks like? The only one I know of are the ones with a hole in each side of a horseshoe shaped snap ring.

These are e-clips: http://www.teamassociated.com/pictures/products/3214/3214_md.jpg

brian Rupnow
02-27-2015, 03:30 PM
Here is one snapped onto a groove in a shaft. They don't have the little "ears" with holes in them for snap ring pliers. The v shaped opening allows them to simply be pressed against the shaft, and if you are really, really lucky they will open themselves and snap into place. They also have a propensity for flying out never to be seen again, or striking you in the eye (ouch).
http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn294/BrianRupnow/BrianRupnow024/E-CLIPS%20003_zpsamrpnec2.jpg (http://s307.photobucket.com/user/BrianRupnow/media/BrianRupnow024/E-CLIPS%20003_zpsamrpnec2.jpg.html)

Norman Bain
02-27-2015, 03:38 PM
I found that tool as well, and it looks like it would be great, except for the fact that it is all metric.

Shall I mention; metric is the way of the future.

brian Rupnow
02-27-2015, 03:45 PM
Keep singing that tune Norman. We all hear ya loud and clear. Canada "went metric" in 1974. It is almost impossible to buy any kind of metric tool here, 40 years later without paying a large premium for it. Same goes for metric fasteners, metric steel, or most other things that a home shop machinist uses. We are dealing with RIGHT NOW Norman, not the future.

Jon Heron
02-27-2015, 03:56 PM
I was lucky enough to be born here in Canada in 1974. :)
I had to learn both systems in school, what a pain...
Guberment job drawing's are always in metric and most others were imperial and sometimes if you were lucky there could be both! So you always needed to carry 2 sets of scales for scaling off the drawings. Problem with laying out stuff is everything else is standard, the light fixtures, panels, switch gear etc. (I am an electrician)...
I just wish the whole world would pick metric and stay with it, it would save so much confusion and wasted time... Too bad its just a pipe dream...
People always ask me why we cant have standardized global electrical standards, lol we cant even standardize measurements let alone entire electrical standards... :o
Crazy!
Cheers,
Jon

brian Rupnow
02-27-2015, 04:21 PM
Jon--I was born in 1946 and educated in British Imperial (inch) measurements. I started apprenticeship as a designer in 1965 and worked in British Imperial inch measurements until 1974, when suddenly it was decreed that Canada was going metric. What a disaster!!! Airplanes ran out of fuel because of the confusion between litres and gallons.--(It's true---look it up.) Suddenly no one knew how tall they were, how much they weighed, how fast there cars were going, nor how far away anything was anymore. Nobody could read the damned thermometer to figure out if it was hot or cold outside. All of us journeyman designers sweated bullets to create drawings in metric, only to go out into the shops and find all the machinists setting around with calculators, fastidiously changing all of the metric dimensions back to British Imperial inch dimensions so they could build things on the millions of dollars worth of shop equipment which only read out in inches. And it hasn't really ever got any better. The major international companies want everything done in metric to appease their international customers. All of the small shops with domestic customers want things in imperial, because everyone understands it better and all the supporting infrastructure for inch dimensioned equipment and supplies is STILL CHEAPER. Metric is the way of the future.--YEAH---RIGHT!!!!

Mark Rand
02-27-2015, 04:32 PM
About 5% of the world's population don't use metric:p


I've came across a standards problem tonight. I need to make two sets of four, machine specific, T-bolts and nuts for my Beaver milling machine. The originals were all 1/2"UNC, but I don't currently have a 1/2" UNC tap. Should I go out and buy a 1/2"x13UNC spiral point tap or just use 1/2" BSW which I have?

Black_Moons
02-27-2015, 06:50 PM
Don't tell anyone, I put some imperial nuts/bolts on my metric chinese lathe.. (that has all the scales/leadscrew in imperial, of course!)

They just so happen to somehow fit the metric wrench that came with the lathe perfectly, however. So I didn't even have to grind down the nuts on them.

RichR
02-27-2015, 09:19 PM
I replaced the bolts that secure the idler pulleys on my mill. They were 1/4-20 with 12mm heads.

Black Forest
02-28-2015, 02:10 AM
OK, thank you for posting the pictures. I have used those little suckers before. And yes they are tricky buggers.

As to the Imperial metric thing. I lived most of my life in USA. Now living in Germany. Here of course is metric. The only time it really catches me is when we drive. Often we drive 160 Km/h or more. No big deal at all but when I change that to Mph in my head, I get a rush because I am driving over 100 mph. It is still engrained in my head that 100mph is really fast! Over here it is no big deal to run down the Autobahn at 120mph. Of course the weight thing works to my advantage as weighing 100 kg doesn't register as being THAT heavy whereas 220 lbs. screams it is time for a diet.

oldtiffie
02-28-2015, 02:23 AM
Here it is in OZ which is pretty well the same except for the USA, Canada and the UK:

It as easy as can be and most here can work in either system.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metrication_in_Australia

The rest of the world as regards metrication:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metrication_in_the_United_States

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_customary_units


NIST (USA):
United States customary units are a system of measurements commonly used in the United States. The U.S. customary system developed from English units which were in use in the British Empire before American independence. However, the British system of measures was overhauled in 1824 to create the Imperial system, changing the definitions of some units. Therefore, while many U.S. units are essentially similar to their Imperial counterparts, there are significant differences between the systems.

The majority of U.S. customary units were redefined in terms of the meter and the kilogram with the Mendenhall Order of 1893 and, in practice, for many years before.[1] These definitions were refined by the international yard and pound agreement of 1959.[2] Americans primarily use customary units in commercial activities, as well as for personal and social use. In science, medicine, many sectors of industry and some of government, metric units are used. The International System of Units (SI), the modern form of the metric system, is preferred for many uses by the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).[3]

Puckdropper
02-28-2015, 09:09 AM
Follow up--My "nuts and bolts" store wanted $57 each for the 3 different tools required to do 1/8" and 3/16" and 1/4" e-clips. My tooling supplier in Barrie wanted $43 each for the same thing. A company called SAE Products in Florida or South Carolina (can't remember which) wanted $35 American (which is roughly $40 Canadian) for the same thing, plus whatever for shipping. I guess I will continue to use my jacknife and needle nosed pliers.---Brian

I've got an idea... Let's see if I can describe it without pictures.

Take a piece of bar stock, and make a slot in the end several thou bigger than the rod diameter. On the bottom of the tool, mill a recess for the clip to fit in, making sure the back of the recess is circular, v-shaped, or has something to keep the clip from sliding when pushing. Drill a hole (or two) for a magnet at a convenient point (a tiny rare earth magnet will do).

To use, place the clip on the tool so the magnet holds it in place. The open end of the clip lines up with the slot. Push the clip straight on to the shaft. The magnets should let the clip expand and snap back in to place, while the recessed area pushes the clip forward.

Removal of the clip might be done using a heavy piano wire. Bend it to form an L shape, mount to the back of the tool and slide the wire in between the clip and shaft. Pull straight out, and hopefully the clip will stay put. Two pieces of wire will probably make removing the clip much easier.

brian Rupnow
02-28-2015, 10:29 AM
Good idea puckdropper. However, these things are incredibly tiny when you get down to the sizes that fit 1/8" and 3/16" shafts. I don't use enough of them to justify purchasing a special insertion tool for $40 to $57 dollars. You can use a jack knife and needle nosed pliers.

Rosco-P
02-28-2015, 05:07 PM
Last stab at this, willing to bet they are overpriced, but anyway....
Found a couple of my E-clip installation tools, they were made by Waldes Truarc, now bought up by Rotorclip: https://www.rotorclip.com/index.php

Installation tools: https://www.rotorclip.com/cat_pdfs/applicator.pdf

Black_Moons
03-01-2015, 03:04 PM
I am kinda sensing you could make one.

For small ones, I would think silver solder would be best. Bigger you could maybe do with a slitting saw.

For smaller ones, Make 2 flat plates that goes into a tang, with a shaft sized U hole in it
In the middle, you place a plate with a C clip sized U hole in it, thickness of the C clip.

Then silver solder the 3 together and weld/solder a handle onto the built up tang of 2 or 3 sheets (for strength)

Rosco-P
03-01-2015, 03:34 PM
Something like: http://www.mcmaster.com/#retaining-ring-pliers/=w4gs77 Make them as a lamination, might be a good use of the steel from an old transformer.

cameron
03-01-2015, 06:54 PM
I have no problem installing or removing those things without special tools except that I always ignore the fact that I know they're going to fly somewhere when they pop out.

You could work on the small jobs inside a clear plastic bag to keep from losing the clips. I could do that too I suppose. Next time. Maybe.

firbikrhd1
03-01-2015, 07:17 PM
I've used one of these for years and it's saved a lot of headaches. It could be made in the shop pretty easily but mine is a store bought version. I've used it on large and small E Clips and those hairpin type clips.

http://www.lislecorp.com/divisions/products/?product=282

J. Randall
03-01-2015, 11:12 PM
I've used one of these for years and it's saved a lot of headaches. It could be made in the shop pretty easily but mine is a store bought version. I've used it on large and small E Clips and those hairpin type clips.

http://www.lislecorp.com/divisions/products/?product=282

I have rebuilt a lot of carbs over the yrs., and never saw that tool,would be the cats meow for those Jesus clips. Sadly the day of the carb is about over, so I probably won't spring for one.
James

vpt
03-02-2015, 08:23 AM
I use a screw driver in one of the two slots to push them off a shaft and use my other free hand to hold the back side of the clip so it doesn't go ppptting.

CCWKen
03-02-2015, 09:36 AM
I replaced the bolts that secure the idler pulleys on my mill. They were 1/4-20 with 12mm heads.

The bolts were probably 6mm x .5 and you didn't know any better. :)

Black_Moons
03-03-2015, 03:58 AM
Something like: http://www.mcmaster.com/#retaining-ring-pliers/=w4gs77 Make them as a lamination, might be a good use of the steel from an old transformer.

No, Steel from transformers is a soft iron. Its closer to lead sheet then steel in strength.

Rosco-P
03-03-2015, 07:26 AM
No, Steel from transformers is a soft iron. Its closer to lead sheet then steel in strength.

Okay, hadn't thought about that.
Honestly, if I were using a couple of sizes of E-clips frequently and I was typically designing my machines around those sizes, I'd just buy the ones at McMaster. People spend more $'s on dining out and get no lasting return on the $'s. YMMV.

krutch
03-03-2015, 05:01 PM
I suppose a tool made just for e-clips would be nice, but I never have had or used one. The clips may be difficult to install at times but with patience AND GOOD LIGHT one doesn't need a special tool. At least I haven't so far. Of course age will tell if my statement is full of holes. It (aging) has ruined some of my other claims to dexterity!

Paul Alciatore
03-03-2015, 11:02 PM
Sounds like a business opportunity here. Buy some inexpensive needle nose pliers. Grind the tips back to the appropriate point. Mill a half round in each jaw, just a little bigger in diameter than the clip and a little less than half their thickness so you can grip them for removal. Perhaps thin the jaws down like duckbill pliers. Done.

Should be able to make them to sell for about $15 to $25 each, even in the good old US.

I make a lot of custom tools from the inexpensive, imported needle nose pliers that are available from various sources. They are fairly good quality, but soft enough for further machining.