PDA

View Full Version : manual rotary table



confederatemule
02-27-2015, 08:08 AM
I am in the market for a rotary table. I have two milling machines. One is a Bridgeport vertical machine with a 9"x32" table and the other is a Cincinnati horizontal machine with a 12"x52" table. My question is; What size rotary table would serve me best and why?

BTW .... I am thinking a 12" rotary table.

Thanks for any help

Mule

JoeLee
02-27-2015, 08:13 AM
It depends on what your needs are. I have an 8" RT. With the chuck mounted to it it's a bit heavy to lift and set down on the table. When I set it on the mills table I set it on a piece of 1/4" plywood so I don't ding the table up. Then I carefully slide the plywood out from under it. So far I haven't found the need for a larger one. But the bigger you go the heavier they get!!!! Something to keep in mind.

JL...............

SGW
02-27-2015, 08:25 AM
As large as will fit...except as Joe points out, they tend to get heavy. I've got a 9" H/V rotary table that weighs about 60 or 70 pounds. I wouldn't want to have to sling around anything much heavier, and 9" has met my needs. It would be nice to have more space for clamps, etc., however. If you can manage a 12" rotary table, go for it, but be sure you have a way of moving it around. A 12" Troyke rotary table is somewhere around 180 pounds. I have thought of rigging some kind of overhead trolley to make moving mine easier.

Lew Hartswick
02-27-2015, 08:28 AM
The 12 " we have at school just about requires two people to move it.
...lew...

John Buffum
02-27-2015, 08:37 AM
I'm very interested in this discussion. I have a Jet JMD-18. My rotary table is an Enco 6" dividing head that rotates from horizontal to vertical. The vulnerability of smaller RT's is rigidity during cut. On a few occasions, I have had minor rotation during the cut, and it's difficult to re-set the point of origin after that.

If you have a shop crane, and the room to use it near your mill, the sky's the limit. 20" chuck? No problem. If you're lifting by hand, well ...

Read your tool catalogs. Most give weights. JL is right. The bigger, the heavier, rising exponentially. Page 432, Enco catalog, 8" - 83 lbs. 10" - 118 lbs. 12" - 199 lbs. If you are built like Conan the Barbarian, no problem. But, you also have to develop a lift strategy that won't damage it. Will the T-slots handle bars inserted with a chain that the shop crane can hook onto?

I, too, am contemplating an 8" table. Still, 83 lbs dead lift ... My 100 year old L.W. Chuck 6" vise is about 60 lbs. I'm no weakling, but it's a challenge.

(big grin) I'm also an amateur photographer. In the photography hobby we have a term, G.A.S. Gear Acquisition Syndrome. I gotta have it because I think I need it. If it almost never gets used after that, you were bit by G.A.S.

Stepside
02-27-2015, 08:38 AM
I have a 15 inch Bridgeport rotary table. The room is nice, but after lifting it a couple of times I built a bridge crane. Actually two of us put it on a rolling table then I would roll it up to the mill and match table height. When the height matched I would slide it onto the mill. It is even heavier when the right angle attachment is installed.

So my thoughts are, get the largest one you can afford and have a means of moving.

John Buffum
02-27-2015, 08:52 AM
EGAD! 15"? What does that hoss WEIGH? On Enco's catalog, a 16" weighs 350 lbs. And how big of a mill do you mount it on?

I saw an ad on Kitmondo for a CNC mill in Sweden. Three stories tall. Customer to move. ;) Was making parts for cruise ships.

confederatemule
02-27-2015, 09:10 AM
Thanks, y'all. I'd like to hear more, but, the subject may be covered.

I no longer have any strength compared to 30 years go. I do have a boom type engine lift. I also have an "A" frame type engine lift, on wheels, that I can't get to the bridgeport mill, but I can get it to the Cincinnati no3 horizontal mill. I do have the ability to build something permanent with a boom that will accommodate both machines. [that sounds like a good idea.]

Now. What can I afford??

Then there is that always present; "BUT !! ...."

Mule

Carm
02-27-2015, 09:32 AM
I am in the market for a rotary table. I have two milling machines. One is a Bridgeport vertical machine with a 9"x32" table and the other is a Cincinnati horizontal machine with a 12"x52" table. My question is; What size rotary table would serve me best and why?

BTW .... I am thinking a 12" rotary table.

Thanks for any help

Mule

Without knowing what your needs are, don't know what serves best. Usually bigger is better for R/T's, BUT as everyone says, more weight. ISTR a B'port has a 500# max loading, and bigger also eats Z.
You could likely put the Bismarck on the Cinci.

If you have a column handy, consider a jib. With a cart you can move to whatever is out of radius. Some people use the B'port for the column.

confederatemule
02-27-2015, 09:55 AM
I have no idea what my needs are. One of my first thoughts are to cut a circle about 16" in diameter out of 1/4" plate. Then again I am sure I will want to make something relatively small.

Ah-Ha. Never thought of "overloading" the mill. I can see where that could be a major factor.

Mule

boslab
02-27-2015, 10:12 AM
Sort of funny, I have a big rotary, I think it's more than 12", got burgled they only managed to get it to the door and gave up, then unbolted a 10" off the mill and stole that instead, I now wish the 10 was heavier!
I found a big old dividing head in a hedge!, also about 200lbs
Get as big as you can!
Mark

Rich Carlstedt
02-27-2015, 10:19 AM
You will not "overload" the table with a 12" RT .

A Troyke RT ( The best, in my experience) will handle 800 pounds (part weight )
This I learned from them personally years ago.
The BP Knee will handle it too. You just do not want to put such a large weight on the mill (1 K lbs)
and then move the table to the extremes, as that WILL put a great load the ways of the mill.
Realize that Bridgeport themselves sold a huge number of 12" RT's that were designed for their mills.
I have a 9 x 32 BP and I use 6", 8" and 12" rotary tables on it.
like others, I put a trolley in for the 12". No Lifting needed.
Put Eyebolts in the T nuts , hook the trolley in and then lower the table, and move the RT away
I have machined 3/4 thick Stainless 15 inch OD on my table with no problems.
Swapped the handle with a pulley and mounted a Bodine DC motor to the mill table and did power rotary milling for circle generation- no sweat.

Realize this : a 12" RT will mill a 2 ounce part, but a 6 inch RT will not mill a 30 pound part !
As when a friend who does off road racing tried to open up his transmission case for bigger bearings found out, and brought the job to me.

Rich

John Buffum
02-27-2015, 11:05 AM
Thanks, y'all. I'd like to hear more, but, the subject may be covered.

I no longer have any strength compared to 30 years go. I do have a boom type engine lift. I also have an "A" frame type engine lift, on wheels, that I can't get to the bridgeport mill, but I can get it to the Cincinnati no3 horizontal mill. I do have the ability to build something permanent with a boom that will accommodate both machines. [that sounds like a good idea.]

Now. What can I afford??

Then there is that always present; "BUT !! ...."

Mule

Cabin Fever Expo coming up FAST. York, PA. April 10-12. There are vendors and auctions. Never can tell what's available. May get something for less than 1/3 of the new price. BUT, there are some vendors who are real proud of their wares. Know the prices. Check out www.kitmondo.com.

I'm going to the expo looking for a 3" or 4" RT. Last year, I bought a benchtop horizontal mill. Talk about Z axis rationing! If I don't find anything at the expo, I may have to make a 3" with 40:1. That way, I can downscale the parts from my Enco head, and use the same chart.

Oh, if only I had room for a Kearney and Trecker horizontal mill. Something in the 3,000 lb to 4,000 lb range. But, (heavy sigh) no room.

Carm
02-27-2015, 11:24 AM
Mule, like Rich C. says, having the R/T out toward the edges puts a strain on things, and will distort Z alignment even if it holds the weight.
Brought up the issue of overload because of a job with a 12" R/T and work where I knew it was too much weight. Rigged up a "floating" counter balance using the shop crane.

lost_cause
02-27-2015, 12:10 PM
keep in mind that they don't show up all that often, but from my experience and in my area, (used) larger tables don't cost any more than the smaller ones do. i've seen 12" ones on craigslist in the ~$200+ range, and sometimes they sit around for a few weeks. if a 6" or 8" shows up, it's for the same amount and usually sold fast. like most everything else machinery related many people can't fit it, so the smaller ones are often more expensive, or at least in more demand.

MikeL46
02-27-2015, 01:18 PM
I have an 8" RT and find it large enough for my needs.

The first things I made for it (you do use tools to make tools for tools, don't you) was a couple of adapter plates. The both have a feature that drops into the central recess on the RT for accurate location. They have different OD's to fit a 6" plain back chuck and a 10" 4 Jaw chuck. While the 4 Jaw bolts into the t-nut slots on the RT, the three jaw has through bolts that thread directly into drilled and tapped holes on the RT. I can swap chucks and be within a thou of runout, no extra alignment needed. As I write this I'm wondering why I needed the 4 Jaw to be accurate to the RT? Because I can, I guess.

If you can put holes in your part and bolt it to the table using the t-nut slots, you can make really large parts work on an 8" RT. You can always plug the holes later if needed.

I usually use the RT with one of the chucks, rarely do I have clamp directly to the RT.

Mike

Another Bill
02-27-2015, 02:03 PM
Get a smaller one.
I bought a ten-inch Phase Two, thinking I could use a big table for small jobs but couldn't use a small table for big jobs. Now, I wish I had bought a smaller one. It is just too heavy to lift.
Bill

oldtiffie
02-27-2015, 07:33 PM
Get a smaller one.
I bought a ten-inch Phase Two, thinking I could use a big table for small jobs but couldn't use a small table for big jobs. Now, I wish I had bought a smaller one. It is just too heavy to lift.
Bill

Same here.

I had a very good "Vertex" 8" "Super Indexing" table (76 Kg ~ 167 pounds) that was really bigger than I needed and was far too heavy and awkward to lift and remove - it was just an accident waiting to happen (which it nearly did several times) so out it went.

http://www.machineryhouse.com.au/R004

I about 40 years ago I was stupid during an awkward heavy lift and wound up with 2 or 3 prolapsed disks in my back as well as 2 weeks on "traction" in hospital as well as 2 years of "physio" therapy and limited capacity to lift.


It taught me a very good lesson which I've never forgotten. If I need more safety or lifting gear I get it before I use the machine again and that has kept me mobile and out of trouble in that regard.

I have a HF-45 vertical mill as well as two Sieg (SX3 and a Super SX3) mills and two 6" rotary tables - one fully set up as standard and the other electronically driven by a "Division Master" accessory on it.

http://divisionmaster.co.uk/divisionmaster.html

oldtiffie
02-27-2015, 09:10 PM
I'm very interested in this discussion. I have a Jet JMD-18. My rotary table is an Enco 6" dividing head that rotates from horizontal to vertical. The vulnerability of smaller RT's is rigidity during cut. On a few occasions, I have had minor rotation during the cut, and it's difficult to re-set the point of origin after that.

If you have a shop crane, and the room to use it near your mill, the sky's the limit. 20" chuck? No problem. If you're lifting by hand, well ...

Read your tool catalogs. Most give weights. JL is right. The bigger, the heavier, rising exponentially. Page 432, Enco catalog, 8" - 83 lbs. 10" - 118 lbs. 12" - 199 lbs. If you are built like Conan the Barbarian, no problem. But, you also have to develop a lift strategy that won't damage it. Will the T-slots handle bars inserted with a chain that the shop crane can hook onto?

I, too, am contemplating an 8" table. Still, 83 lbs dead lift ... My 100 year old L.W. Chuck 6" vise is about 60 lbs. I'm no weakling, but it's a challenge.

(big grin) I'm also an amateur photographer. In the photography hobby we have a term, G.A.S. Gear Acquisition Syndrome. I gotta have it because I think I need it. If it almost never gets used after that, you were bit by G.A.S.

It is best if the table is "locked" at each position (with the table clamp) - that way "back-lash is not a problem nor is table movement during the cutting.

Its also best to always position the table by rotating the hand wheel clockwise as that eliminates the "back-lash" error as well.

If you are cutting with the table rotating then again turn the hand-wheel clockwise as well.

I don't worry about the back-lash mostly but its easy to reduce it to an acceptable level but I don't count on eliminating it.

If the rotary table is being used as a "4th" (or 5th) mill CNC axis then it may need to reverse but in any case the table clamp cannot/should not be used.

Sim
02-28-2015, 09:59 AM
I have a 10" horizontal/vertical RT and it is about all I can lift. I can get it OFF the mill with a chuck on but that is really too heavy.
I think 8" is a good size if you want to be able to move it without a crane. There are usually ways to get big stuff onto a smaller table.

confederatemule
02-28-2015, 05:02 PM
Thanks y'all, I'm still listenin.

Mule

John Buffum
03-03-2015, 07:39 AM
It is best if the table is "locked" at each position (with the table clamp) - that way "back-lash is not a problem nor is table movement during the cutting.

Its also best to always position the table by rotating the hand wheel clockwise as that eliminates the "back-lash" error as well.

If you are cutting with the table rotating then again turn the hand-wheel clockwise as well.

I don't worry about the back-lash mostly but its easy to reduce it to an acceptable level but I don't count on eliminating it.

If the rotary table is being used as a "4th" (or 5th) mill CNC axis then it may need to reverse but in any case the table clamp cannot/should not be used.

Hey! GREAT suggestions! Add to that, multiple cuts with smaller end mills at higher rpm, and not one cut with a big, honkin' end mill at low RPM.

Yeah, I use such locks as the manufacturer provided, but 1/2" end mills are not a good idea with this dividing head. I have a shop made face plate, with a 3/8" NF set screw pressing on a thread formed brass foot to lock the face plate. Works with 1/4" end mills. Iffy with 3/8, and risky with 1/2".

You could always make your own. Numerous plans around. Use of 6061 can reduce weight, and you can add more locks.

At this year's Cabin Fever Expo, I'll be lookin' for an 8" and a 4".

Alistair Hosie
03-03-2015, 01:06 PM
I have no idea what my needs are. One of my first thoughts are to cut a circle about 16" in diameter out of 1/4" plate. Then again I am sure I will want to make something relatively small.

Hi would you not be able to do this accurately with a large lathe?Alistair

confederatemule
03-03-2015, 02:21 PM
Alistar, my lathe is an Atlas/Craftsman12x36.

Mule

John Buffum
03-03-2015, 03:47 PM
Egad! A 16" disk, requiring accuracy!

My lathe is a 9, but my mill might handle that, if it was permitted to drill two holes near the middle. And it would take a long time.

1. Tiny reference hole in center. Through.
2. Use a marker on a cobbled together large trammel to mark a 16-1/4" circle.
3. Cut with "smoke axe" outside the marked circle. Clean weld globs and crudely smooth the edge with a grinder.
4. Drill two holes, one on each side of the center hole, along the axis. These two holes will allow the workpiece to be bolted to T nuts on the small rotary table.
5. Using the tiny reference hole again, scratch mark a 16.05" circle. VERIFY the 16.05"!!
6. Mount a 1/4" end mill, and set to the appropriate speed.
7. Turning the RT, make LIGHT cuts, with lots of lube, with the end mill until the scratched circle is consumed.
8. If you have a measuring device that can accurately measure 16", measure 4 or 5 axes of the circle.
9. Dust where over.
10. Clean up and beam with pride.

At least, that's how I would do it. If the drill holes can't be there, carefully pick them up afterwards with the torch, grind carefully, and polish with sandpaper.

confederatemule
03-03-2015, 04:58 PM
John Buffum, I don't have a rotary table of any size. But I do thank you for the detailed instructions.
The 16" diameter plate does not require accuracy.
I am going to build a base plate for a 220 volt single phase electric motor for my Bridgeport Mill. The smoke axe and a grinder will produce a plate that will work and look just fine.
Due to prices on used RT's, I will not be buying one soon.

Mule

John Buffum
03-03-2015, 06:40 PM
John Buffum, I don't have a rotary table of any size. But I do thank you for the detailed instructions.
The 16" diameter plate does not require accuracy.
I am going to build a base plate for a 220 volt single phase electric motor for my Bridgeport Mill. The smoke axe and a grinder will produce a plate that will work and look just fine.
Due to prices on used RT's, I will not be buying one soon.

Mule

(big grin) :) You could still BUILD one, of the size you feel you require. Jan-Feb 2007 Home Shop Machinist, Fred Prestridge's "Easy Rotary Table" for three more issues. Probably can get reprints. His is 4", but you can scale up. If I can't find one at Cabin Fever Expo, I'm building his, but with 40 teeth to the gear.

You could probably build an 8" RT for about $50 in materials. That's with steel, 85 to the pound, and aluminum $3.00 per pound. I'm assuming an aluminum face plate 8" dia x 2-1/2" thick. The bronze for the gear would be pricey, but, if you got a short section of thick walled tube, with the ID less than your spindle, you could save big. You'd want to go O-1 for the spindle. Make it the same thread as your lathe, so you can exchange chucks.

oldtiffie
03-03-2015, 08:19 PM
It seems that from posts some time ago that many here have plasma cutters that are rated as 1/2" (3/8"?) at 10" per minute.

In the right hands and with practice they can cut quite smoothly and accurately and give a reasonable finish (which can be finished by hand either on the face of a grinding wheel on a pedestal grinder and/or a good angle grinder.

Mark the circle out with "Blue Di\ye" (or similar) and centre-punch the plate at say 1/2" to 1" centres.

Drill a 1/4" "starter hole" away from or tangent to the marked-our circle (to start the plasma cut).

Make a guide template (sheet hard board is OK).

Plasma cutters will work down to steel "sheet metal" and are pretty cheap and very handy.

http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Welders%20and%20air%20tools/Plasma-cut1.jpg

http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Welders%20and%20air%20tools/Plasma-cut2.jpg

https://www.google.com.au/search?q=small+shop+plasma+cutter&biw=1536&bih=732&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=8lv2VKjnGIjk8gWLzYHYBw&ved=0CEoQsAQ

https://www.google.com.au/?gws_rd=ssl#q=small+shop+plasma+cutter

For me anyway (who got rid of a new condition 8" rotary table and still has and uses two 6" RT's) the plasma cutter combined with a an oxy-acet cutting torch etc. does all I need.

http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Welders%20and%20air%20tools/Oxy-acet2.jpg

http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Welders%20and%20air%20tools/Oxy-acet1.jpg

confederatemule
03-04-2015, 06:26 PM
Thanks for all of the great suggestions, ideas, opinions, and links.

Y'all have been very helpful.

Mule

Stepside
03-04-2015, 09:26 PM
To cut a disc that is only "motor mount pretty", I would be tempted to use a Band Saw with a small tooth count. 1) Mark out the circle and cut off the corners until you have an Octagon or even more sides. This does not have to be pretty, just enough material left for a kerf and maybe a 1/8 inch of waste. 2) drill an axle hole in the center. A 1/4 inch axle should be plenty large enough. 3) drill an axle hole in a piece of 1/2" or 3/4" plywood or MDF. The wood should be large enough to support the plate where the kerf will be located. 4) Cut through the plate and the wood until the saw teeth are right at 9 o'clock. Clamp the wood to the saw table and then rotate the plate.
The important parts are the support, a tight axle, the 9"oclock location and the correct blade. A good wood cutting blade would work on Aluminum. Some saw wax would be a plus.

confederatemule
03-04-2015, 10:59 PM
John Buffum, I have look every way I know to look and have had no lick at finding anything on "Easy Rotary Table" By Fred Prestridge. Is there a pdf file that can be downloaded?

confederatemule
03-04-2015, 11:01 PM
Stepside, your suggestion sounds doable.
Mule

PixMan
03-04-2015, 11:16 PM
Here's a high precision rotary table, capable of acting as a dividing head too! It could handle the 16" task with PLENTY of room to spare. The only problem might be that it weighs more than your machine.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/WALTER-31-INDEXING-HORIZONTAL-ROTARY-TABLE-RT-800TG-/381179100293?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item58c00b7c85

I have a Walter tilting dividing head HU-80 that I can lift without too much trouble. It weighs about the same as my 10" Phase II horizontal/vertical rotary table and is a dream to use!

confederatemule
03-05-2015, 07:05 AM
PixMan, That is a nice RT. I think it is a little larger than my needs will ever be. About the weight, at 1500 pounds, I don't think it out weighs my Bridgeport and I am sure it is no match for my Cincinnati no.3 horizontal. I added it to my watch list, just to see what the top bid is.

Mule

TNDave
03-05-2015, 09:51 AM
A few months back I got a new 8" Vertex hor/vert rotary table at a good price on eBay. I just purchased a 6" 3 jaw chuck an adapter for it.

"http://www.ebay.com/itm/The-adapter-and-3-jaw-chuck-for-8-rotary-tables-/171050661270?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item27d369f596"

When I opened the chuck and adapter, saw it was "Phase II". My table has a MT3 taper hole in the center, the chuck and adapter came with a straight plug for centering. I will either make another locating plug, or just indicate the chuck in when needed.

probably plenty big enough for most of what I will ever do on my Bridgeport. The weight of the table and chuck is just about all I want to deal with hand carrying it.

PixMan
03-05-2015, 10:16 AM
PixMan, That is a nice RT. I think it is a little larger than my needs will ever be. About the weight, at 1500 pounds, I don't think it out weighs my Bridgeport and I am sure it is no match for my Cincinnati no.3 horizontal. I added it to my watch list, just to see what the top bid is.

Mule

It'll probably go for well over $1000 in the end, but it's worth nearly ten times that and new it was in the "low 5 figures."

dian
03-05-2015, 10:30 AM
1500 pounds? poor table.

lakeside53
03-05-2015, 11:42 AM
I could have had a 15 inch Hoffman 3 axis rotary table for $300, like new... amazing table but I couldn't figure you what I'd have used it for on my Bridgeport. It would have tipped the mill over. lol.

The guys that bought it put servo control on all axis and used it for an astronomical telescope base.

For while I had a "like new" 12 inch Hoffman - at 450lb it was just plain unmanageable. Amazingly accurate specs.. Should have kept it though. Sold it for $200..

John Buffum
03-05-2015, 03:47 PM
John Buffum, I have look every way I know to look and have had no lick at finding anything on "Easy Rotary Table" By Fred Prestridge. Is there a pdf file that can be downloaded?

Email George Buliss gbuliss@villagepress.com. Ask for either back issues or article reprints. He'll help you.

confederatemule
03-05-2015, 09:37 PM
Thanks John.

confederatemule
03-05-2015, 09:51 PM
Email George Buliss gbuliss@villagepress.com. Ask for either back issues or article reprints. He'll help you.

I tried, but the email address did not work.

oldtiffie
03-06-2015, 07:13 PM
To cut a disc that is only "motor mount pretty", I would be tempted to use a Band Saw with a small tooth count. 1) Mark out the circle and cut off the corners until you have an Octagon or even more sides. This does not have to be pretty, just enough material left for a kerf and maybe a 1/8 inch of waste. 2) drill an axle hole in the center. A 1/4 inch axle should be plenty large enough. 3) drill an axle hole in a piece of 1/2" or 3/4" plywood or MDF. The wood should be large enough to support the plate where the kerf will be located. 4) Cut through the plate and the wood until the saw teeth are right at 9 o'clock. Clamp the wood to the saw table and then rotate the plate.
The important parts are the support, a tight axle, the 9"oclock location and the correct blade. A good wood cutting blade would work on Aluminum. Some saw wax would be a plus.

That is sure one big length of band-sawing - the 16" circle alone is about 50" - and add the other smaller length bits and you have quite a job.

All this assumed that the depth of the throat of the band-saw exceeds say 9" radius on the band saw table if cutting on the band-saw table other-wise it means sawing with the part "outside" the table - ie "jury ("jerry"??) rigging" it or holding it by hand.

Oxy-acet or a plasma cutter are looking better by the minute.

John Buffum
03-06-2015, 08:17 PM
I tried, but the email address did not work.
Right now, the magazine is in the middle of a corporate change. I'd do it for you, but it's about 25 pages of stuff. No guarantee it would all come through ok. And scanned .JPG sometimes loses text at the staple groove. Infuriating.

On their website, their back issues phone number is 1-800-447-7367. Again, corporate changes. Expect chaos. Just checked the number. It's good. 8 AM - 5 PM CST.

confederatemule
03-11-2015, 10:10 AM
Here's a high precision rotary table, capable of acting as a dividing head too! It could handle the 16" task with PLENTY of room to spare. The only problem might be that it weighs more than your machine.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/WALTER-31-INDEXING-HORIZONTAL-ROTARY-TABLE-RT-800TG-/381179100293?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item58c00b7c85

I have a Walter tilting dividing head HU-80 that I can lift without too much trouble. It weighs about the same as my 10" Phase II horizontal/vertical rotary table and is a dream to use!

PixMan, it sold last night for $360.00

George Bulliss
03-11-2015, 11:02 AM
Right now, the magazine is in the middle of a corporate change. I'd do it for you, but it's about 25 pages of stuff. No guarantee it would all come through ok. And scanned .JPG sometimes loses text at the staple groove. Infuriating.

On their website, their back issues phone number is 1-800-447-7367. Again, corporate changes. Expect chaos. Just checked the number. It's good. 8 AM - 5 PM CST.

No corporate change going on here that I'm aware of. You just misspelled my name in the email. The correct email is gbulliss(at)villagepress(dot)com.
The company did change the email addresses of all employees, so my return emails don't have the @villagepress address. However, the change was done mainly to better identify other parts of the company and really has nothing to do with the magazines. The @villagepress address still works to get email to me and is what we list in the magazines.