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View Full Version : I Don't Need No Stink'n CNC!...Drilling Jig



rbertalotto
02-28-2015, 06:39 PM
I make something called a "Cowboy Action Staging Strip"...It requires lots of properly spaced holes. I built a jig to do just that.
Thought you might enjoy it:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u0anzFIx2M8&feature=youtu.be

You can read about the Staging Strips here:

www.rvbprecision.com

IdahoJim
02-28-2015, 07:01 PM
Nice Roy. Question...what do the aluminum strips pivot on? Is there a rod clear through?
Jim

rbertalotto
02-28-2015, 07:13 PM
Hi Jim,

Yes. I drilled clear through with a very long. 1/8" drill and inserted a steel rod.

I was drilling these holes using the DRO on the milling machine but it just took way to long and I need to make 200 of these things!

WilsonT
02-28-2015, 10:19 PM
You might consider using a forstner bit in place of the twist drill. It will produce a cleaner hole (and will eliminate the need for the aluminum plate).

Ironwoodsmith
03-01-2015, 01:12 AM
Forstner bits are slow to drill. What he has there is a wood bit and probably as good as any. I would stack two and drill them together. Nice product in the end.

rbertalotto
03-01-2015, 07:22 AM
The bit I'm using is a brad point, side cutting drill that I had to grind to change the diameter for a 45 Long Colt case. A Forstner bit would load up on this oak and be very slow and it would still blow out without the aluminum......I know because that was the first bit I tried...

Baz
03-01-2015, 08:26 AM
I'd put a spring arrangement in front to hold it against the back fence - as used in wood routing tables as it will be really annoying to sneeze and move the job a little at the critical moment.
The right hand having to drop down and move the stops is very inefficient. How about moving the head down to give only 1/10 in clearance on the bit when up and using a bit of string down from the handle to a foot pedal.
I know you're not in mass production, but it just must get very boring do if it takes too long.

vpt
03-01-2015, 08:51 AM
Nice jig for getting it done! Thanks for the video.

Tony Ennis
03-01-2015, 09:25 AM
Nice jig, especially if the holes didn't have to be equally spaced. For equally spaced holes, the technique for used for making box/finger joints might be simpler. The gist is... imagine that instead of the aluminum stops, have one 'stop' located to the right of the drill bit. But instead of a stop, it is a rocker that drops a rod into the hole previously drilled. So to locate the next hole, shift the work to the right and drop the rod into the hole previously drilled.


http://www.sawdustmaking.com/Box%20Joint/boxjointjig.html

Lew Hartswick
03-01-2015, 09:38 AM
Nice jig, especially if the holes didn't have to be equally spaced. For equally spaced holes, the technique for used for making box/finger joints might be simpler. The gist is... imagine that instead of the aluminum stops, have one 'stop' located to the right of the drill bit. But instead of a stop, it is a rocker that drops a rod into the hole previously drilled. So to locate the next hole, shift the work to the right and drop the rod into the hole previously drilled.


http://www.sawdustmaking.com/Box%20Joint/boxjointjig.html
VERY GOOD FOR "Mod 1" . Some of those ideas could be implemented for Mod 2. :-) At least that is the way I do for such jigs and fixtures. I really enjoy the fixture/jig design
a lot more than the use of same. :-)
...lew...

Frank Ford
03-01-2015, 11:22 AM
A quick thought on technique, requiring a slight (I hope) mod of the fixture -

How about starting with all the flippers in the up position, riding on the back edge of the part? That way you could pull the part to the left, let the next finger drop down, butt up against it, drill and repeat. You'd be able to avoid a lot of movement that way, working one-handed on the part.

Lew Hartswick
03-01-2015, 12:10 PM
Good one Frank. :-)
..lew...

PixMan
03-01-2015, 01:14 PM
Fine way to do it, and probably a lot less spent than the $1500 Prototrak 2-axis CNC mill I got sitting here.

:D

rbertalotto
03-01-2015, 10:04 PM
Frank, Great idea. I'm going to have to look into that as a modification. As far as the other Ideas I actually used the box joint technique on the table saw to cut the slots for the little aluminum stops.
And lastly, with a Bradpoint drillbit once the Bradpoint touches the wood it never moves out of position.

Juergenwt
03-01-2015, 10:58 PM
Works OK. Next time use a rail like you have. Put in a pin 1/2 size of the hole, drill and just lift the strip over the pin, push against the pin and drill, lift over and push and drill and so on. Tool building time 15 min.. From a tool and die maker.

dian
03-02-2015, 10:40 AM
sorry, didnt get that. where does the pin goe?

rbertalotto
03-07-2015, 06:51 AM
Put in a pin 1/2 size of the hole, drill and just lift the strip over the pin, push against the pin and drill, lift over and push and drill and so on.

Rather than sliding the piece up against the stop he is suggesting lifting it up and over a pin.......which would allow sawdust and chips to get under the piece....From a cabinet maker....:cool:

Tony Ennis
03-07-2015, 08:19 AM
I'd probably use a conic, not a pin...From a computer programmer... :cool:

rbertalotto
03-07-2015, 09:26 PM
Lol....:d

DATo
03-08-2015, 06:33 AM
That's an efficient and creative solution to the problem. I'm impressed with the way you think. The only hang up I can see is that your fingers seem to be getting quite close to that cutter. If, (Baby Jebus forbid) you get your finger caught between that aluminum tab and that moving cutter you might get a nasty injury.

rbertalotto
03-08-2015, 09:05 PM
Yup...We do need to be careful out there!