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View Full Version : Awesome lathe deal in Sacramento, CA if you've got space.



Forestgnome
03-10-2015, 09:57 AM
No connection, wish I had more space.

http://sacramento.craigslist.org/tls/4924622843.html

bborr01
03-10-2015, 10:02 AM
That sure looks like a bargain to me.

Brian

Axkiker
03-10-2015, 11:11 AM
I have seriously thought about getting an old forklift just to keep outside in the even I ran across deals like this. I need a bit more room but at some point I plan on making that happen

john hobdeclipe
03-10-2015, 01:31 PM
I have seriously thought about getting an old forklift just to keep outside in the even I ran across deals like this. I need a bit more room but at some point I plan on making that happen

Sacramento to Louisville is a long ways on a forklift.

BigMike782
03-10-2015, 01:35 PM
Especially in reverse:D

jep24601
03-10-2015, 05:39 PM
Only $500 too:

http://images.craigslist.org/00Z0Z_66p2a53CJ2v_600x450.jpg

justanengineer
03-10-2015, 09:21 PM
Its only a deal if it isnt scrap and is complete. JMO but I'm less inclined to take risk on the big machines than the small ones, too much work moving and the weather usually is worse the more difficult the move is.

lakeside53
03-10-2015, 09:42 PM
It's not a lot bigger than I have... $500 is nearly scrap value. No absolute need for a forklift... you can move it with 2 pallet jacks and lift trailer.

It is a steal.... if the bed/carriage aren't trashed.

If it was local, I'd make space!

plunger
03-11-2015, 01:22 AM
Too risky if you cant make sure everything is there ,cant see the leadscrew?

lakeside53
03-11-2015, 01:34 AM
you get to see it before handing over the cash!

Paul Alciatore
03-11-2015, 01:45 AM
The small lathes go for bigger bucks on E-Bay. Ones that will fit in a garage without raising the roof and pouring new concrete. The larger ones are almost always real bargains, probably due to a limited market.

bjmh46
03-11-2015, 07:31 AM
Looks to me like the apron is missing, can't see one on the lathe or in the pile of parts. If it is missing, it would be a deal-breaker for me!

Bob

DR
03-11-2015, 07:45 AM
I would pass on it, even if free, unless I understood totally why it was taken apart. And would want some assurance all the parts are there.

Just one part missing, like the lead screw, could make the machine uneconomic to reassemble.

Apparently, buyers in Sacramento are not jumping on it. Listed a day ago and listing updated at least once.

JCHannum
03-11-2015, 09:13 AM
The apron is on the pallet in front of the machine, the leadscrew is in the chip pan behind the lathe.

I can't tell what the make is, but think I can see made in Brazil on the gearchange chart, Lagun?

Glug
03-11-2015, 07:22 PM
Given the fully supported chassis, and the way the bed is supported in the middle, it looks like a guy could chop a couple-few feet off that lathe. Maybe with some creative thinking a use could be found for the chopped part?


http://images.craigslist.org/00Z0Z_66p2a53CJ2v_600x450.jpg

Axkiker
03-11-2015, 09:06 PM
Given the fully supported chassis, and the way the bed is supported in the middle, it looks like a guy could chop a couple-few feet off that lathe. Maybe with some creative thinking a use could be found for the chopped part?

Ive always wondered if it were possible to hack down a huge lathe into a more manageable size without completely destroying the bed. By looking at the one above I would think you could cut it right after that middle support and still get 30" between centers. Do a little welding to the base and table and boom there you have a more home shop sized lathe.

Now cutting it is the question. First thoughts are a torch which im pretty sure would ruin the entire thing. Next would be some sort of abrasive chop saw which I also think wouldnt do it much good.

Anyone have the world largest power hacksaw??? set it on slow and comeback tomorrow around 5 pm

becksmachine
03-12-2015, 01:48 AM
Now cutting it is the question. First thoughts are a torch which im pretty sure would ruin the entire thing.

Trick question, when was the last time you cut cast iron with a torch?

:rolleyes:

Dave

darryl
03-12-2015, 04:09 AM
I think that if I really wanted that thing, and wanted the bed shorter, I could cut it with a hacksaw. It would take a while. I'd start with about six blades and swap them out every five minutes so each gets used equally. If you break or damage one, the others would be able to fit in the kerf. I think I'd want the bed upside down to start with. If the ways are hardened and the blades won't cut it, at least you would get to the point where you could break it to finish the job.

I'd have to really want it though- and then I'd probably want it in one piece, as is.

If I was going to cut it, I'd do so right at the point where the shadow is below the carriage- about the middle of the shadow or a bit to the left of that.

bborr01
03-12-2015, 09:28 AM
I just noticed that the lathe appears to not have any leadscrew or other shafts for driving the carriage. That would make quite a difference is the usability of it.

Brian

Rosco-P
03-12-2015, 09:42 AM
I just noticed that the lathe appears to not have any leadscrew or other shafts for driving the carriage. That would make quite a difference is the usability of it.

Brian

See post #14.
If the lathe is not already gone, I'm sure the Craigslist poster will answer all questions.

DR
03-12-2015, 12:34 PM
As of now the 3 day old listing is still up on CL, updated 14 hours ago.

It's one thing to dream about what a good deal it MIGHT be, a totally different deal to get your act together and haul it away and hope it's fixable.

BigMike782
03-12-2015, 04:07 PM
Maybe I am naive but I don't understand why some want to write it off as scrap without knowing why the seller is selling. I bought my lathe of CL and it came from a shop that had gotten newer machines and had no need for this older one. It has issues but is still in good shape and I suspect is the last lathe I will ever need. Could it be that the seller simply does not need it and would rather sell to someone that needs a lathe than to a scrap yard?

Axkiker
03-12-2015, 04:27 PM
Maybe I am naive but I don't understand why some want to write it off as scrap without knowing why the seller is selling. I bought my lathe of CL and it came from a shop that had gotten newer machines and had no need for this older one. It has issues but is still in good shape and I suspect is the last lathe I will ever need. Could it be that the seller simply does not need it and would rather sell to someone that needs a lathe than to a scrap yard?

Yeah im kinda curious as well. I keep hearing "well if it doesnt have this or that its junk". Then why do somany people pay way more than that for way smaller lathes on craigslist or Ebay. Granted you must have a way to haul and offload the item. If you do have that capability though it seems like there would need to be a lot missing for this to not at least a descent deal..


Like I said that statement is limited to the guyes who can haul and offload the item which I understand is limited.

Glug
03-12-2015, 05:05 PM
I've always read that the lathe is the machine that can do anything, so I'm a bit surprised nobody has told us how to use this lathe to cut itself in half.

achtanelion
03-12-2015, 05:19 PM
I've always read that the lathe is the machine that can do anything, so I'm a bit surprised nobody has told us how to use this lathe to cut itself in half.

A bar between centres with a cold saw blade mounted on it? Put the cross slide at the end of the bed to mount your dead center and you might be able to use power feed. Need a blade with a wide kerf so it doesn't bind.

Just spitballin of course.

J

Rosco-P
03-12-2015, 05:27 PM
I've always read that the lathe is the machine that can do anything, so I'm a bit surprised nobody has told us how to use this lathe to cut itself in half.

I think the statement is: The lathe is the only machine that can reproduce itself.

http://www.anvilfire.com/FAQs/lathes.php

doctor demo
03-12-2015, 05:52 PM
I think that if I really wanted that thing, and wanted the bed shorter, I could cut it with a hacksaw.

I'd have to really want it though- and then I'd probably want it in one piece, as is.

If I was going to cut it, I'd do so right at the point where the shadow is below the carriage- about the middle of the shadow or a bit to the left of that.

An angle grinder with cutoff discs works very well for cutting a cast iron lathe bed in two, I cut a Leblond in half once.

Steve

peekaboobus
03-12-2015, 06:35 PM
I think the statement is: The lathe is the only machine that can reproduce itself.

http://www.anvilfire.com/FAQs/lathes.php

how does a lathe reproduce a flat cross slide?

cameron
03-12-2015, 07:49 PM
how does a lathe reproduce a flat cross slide?

You mount the slide on the lathe spindle and face it.

boslab
03-12-2015, 07:53 PM
I'd hazard a guess that there's not going to be a whole lot wrong with this machine, nothing un fixable anyway, the reason for stripping the carrige was probably half nut wear or power feed problem, that's the usual mo, as for leadscrew, you can buy a new one, it doesn't even have to be the bed length, I've seen one with a shorter one fitted, usually threading isn't that long, I've even seen one made out of two old lead screws, worked ok.
I think it worth a go, I certainly would never ever consider cutting a lathe down, the unused bed don't eat or drink, you could even fit it with a vertical mill on the ass end
Mark

flylo
03-12-2015, 11:03 PM
I'd buy it in a heartbeat if it were close. Worst case keep the motoe, controls, chucks, etc scrap the rest. Best case you'd have a great lathe & why cut it off find 3' extra & have a great lathe. Either way it's a win or a BIG WIN. Can't lose if you're close & have the tools & know how to move it.

peekaboobus
03-13-2015, 04:38 AM
You mount the slide on the lathe spindle and face it.

Most lathe have 2 axis motion. Most mills have 3 axis motion. You can do more on a mill than a lathe. You will be unable to position the cuts to cut say a dovetail. You can't creep in your cuts to dimension. Because you only have 2 axis motion. You can't cut all 3 directions like a milling machine. Of course you can design with gibs that tighten. But still. Some parts can't be made on a lathe. I'd like to see someone manufacture that lathe, on a lathe they are using. You'd have a much better chance at success trying that task on a mill.

Doc Nickel
03-13-2015, 05:24 AM
Most lathe have 2 axis motion. Most mills have 3 axis motion. You can do more on a mill than a lathe.

-The saying is more conceptual than literal. The idea is that the lathe- or the concept of a lathe, was the first "machine tool". First the bow lathe (which dates back to ancient Egyptian times) then of course more refined versions up to the treadle lathe, etc. The headstock of the lathe became the first milling machine- first people just clamped the workpiece to the standard carriage, then started making specialized wider carriages specifically for milling, etc.

The saying is not literal- IE, it doesn't mean you take a Monarch 10EE, and using only it, can make a second Monarch 10EE. It's more the concept- if you start with nothing (desert island, remote village with only some junk to salvage, etc.) a basic lathe is the simplest "machine" tool to make. Using it, you can make a better lathe, which can then be used to make parts of a still better lathe.

Doc.

RussZHC
03-13-2015, 07:03 AM
You will be unable to position the cuts to cut say a dovetail.

if you can cut keyways, in many respects are not dovetails the same?

Not saying I would, or you should...

JCHannum
03-13-2015, 08:27 AM
What can be accomplished on a lathe, is largely a mattter of the user's abilities and imagination. The engine lathe is the most versatile machine tool, it is capable of performing the operation of any other machine tool. Fixtures or atachments might be required in some instances, but these too can be made on the lathe.

On this site, in the shop tours, Paul Kuhni's shop shows what can be accomplished by a very talented individual with nothing more than an Atlas 6" lathe and a bench grinder.

http://www.homeshopmachinist.net/shoptours/paulkuhni

peekaboobus
03-13-2015, 10:52 AM
-The saying is more conceptual than literal. The idea is that the lathe- or the concept of a lathe, was the first "machine tool". First the bow lathe (which dates back to ancient Egyptian times) then of course more refined versions up to the treadle lathe, etc. The headstock of the lathe became the first milling machine- first people just clamped the workpiece to the standard carriage, then started making specialized wider carriages specifically for milling, etc.

The saying is not literal- IE, it doesn't mean you take a Monarch 10EE, and using only it, can make a second Monarch 10EE. It's more the concept- if you start with nothing (desert island, remote village with only some junk to salvage, etc.) a basic lathe is the simplest "machine" tool to make. Using it, you can make a better lathe, which can then be used to make parts of a still better lathe.

Doc.

I know its not literal. But my point stands. You will have a much easier time with that task of self replicating, if you were using a mill tasked to make a mill, than a 2 axis lathe tasked to make a lathe. In fact, a 3axis mill can also be a lathe when you chuck a workpiece on the spindle and mount lathing tools on the table. Just less rigid.

A mill is truly one that can make most of its mechanical parts. A lathe can't make most of its mechanical parts. Not well anyway. I suppose you can always 'shim' square work pieces when you are trying to 'creep to dimensions'. Not at all ideal though.

JCHannum
03-13-2015, 12:27 PM
You might want to get a copy of the Dave Gingery book on making a lathe in the home foundry. It quite well describes the process of making a lathe from the ground up, using a lathe to build itself. While he uses castings, the process will work just as well using barstock.

How would you propose making a leadscrew with a milling machine?

boslab
03-13-2015, 01:16 PM
Helical milling?,
Mark

MikeL46
03-13-2015, 01:16 PM
How would you propose making a leadscrew with a milling machine?

It is much easier to make a ball on a lathe than on a mill.

I can't think of anything I can't do on the lathe but can do on the mill. It may be a very difficult setup, but it is doable.

Mike

flylo
03-13-2015, 02:46 PM
The ad's down so I hope one of us bought it.