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View Full Version : Anybody have a few extra Molex connectors?



DICKEYBIRD
03-19-2015, 08:46 PM
Looking for a 16 pin #22-01-3167 and a 5 pin #22-01-3057 for my servo drive. I have the insert terminals. Ya gotta buy a sackful on ebay so hopefully somebody has a couple I can barter for.

J Tiers
03-19-2015, 08:59 PM
They do

http://www.digikey.com/product-search/en?x=13&y=19&lang=en&site=us&keywords=22-01-3057

http://www.digikey.com/product-search/en?KeyWords=22-01-3167&WT.z_header=search_go

lwalker
03-19-2015, 09:29 PM
I might have some of the 5-pin ones. I can check after I put the little one to bed

macona
03-19-2015, 09:50 PM
Just order them from digikey. You are going to want the crimper too. You will absolutely not regret buying it. You will get secure terminations that won't come loose on you. Do it right.

http://www.digikey.com/product-search/en?KeyWords=63811-1000&WT.z_header=search_go

Yeah, its not cheap but totally worth it. The price has gone up in the past few years.

Don't forget the terminals. Buy extra.

http://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/0008500159/WM9847CT-ND/3071499

bborr01
03-19-2015, 10:57 PM
I have bought them form Jameco before. Something like 50 cents each or maybe 5 cents each if you are buying 10,000 of them. jameco.com

Brian

MaxHeadRoom
03-20-2015, 12:08 AM
Dickybird you in box is full!!
Max.

Paul Alciatore
03-20-2015, 12:25 AM
Yes, yes, yes to Digi-Key, Mouser, Newark, Jameco, etc. If you want an electronic item, go to an electronic supply house. They typically have pricing from one to 1000 pieces or more.

YES also to the correct crimping tool, but the one that macoma referred to is not necessarily the only or the least expensive choice. I have this one:

http://www.newark.com/aim-cambridge/24-7373p/crimp-tool-barrel-connector-contact/dp/66K7864?ost=24-7373P

$11.82 for quantity of one. It is of heavy construction and works fine on many open barrel and closed barrel crimps.

PS: My test for a good crimp is to crimp it, put the pin in the vise, grab the wire with pliers and pull until it fails. If the wire pulled out, it is not a good crimp. If the wire was ripped apart at the crimp, then it was good. For a proper crimp, metal must flow and microscopic spot welds should form. It should be a gas tight joint so no corrosion can form between the two metals.

PStechPaul
03-20-2015, 02:19 AM
I have hundreds of the insulation displacement type surplus, but what you need has removable crimp terminals. I use an inexpensive Amp "Service Tool I" and then I solder the connection before inserting into the housing. A proper crimp should be OK, but solder makes it absolutely solid.

macona
03-20-2015, 03:26 AM
Solder can cause issues because the solder wicks up the wire causing a hard spot that is susceptible to fatigue. If you solder you need some sort of support to keep the wire from flexing near the connector.

macona
03-20-2015, 03:29 AM
YES also to the correct crimping tool, but the one that macoma referred to is not necessarily the only or the least expensive choice. I have this one:

http://www.newark.com/aim-cambridge/24-7373p/crimp-tool-barrel-connector-contact/dp/66K7864?ost=24-7373P



$11.82 for quantity of one. It is of heavy construction and works fine on many open barrel and closed barrel crimps.



The problem with that one is for the small connections like these little molex you have almost no choice in sizes. I tend to like to use two different sizes when I crimp, one for the metal on metal crimp and one for the insulation.

There are cheaper ones than the molex, it is just one of the ones I have. There are some pretty decent ones on aliexpress but shipping will take weeks.

Sparky_NY
03-20-2015, 06:31 AM
Solder can cause issues because the solder wicks up the wire causing a hard spot that is susceptible to fatigue. If you solder you need some sort of support to keep the wire from flexing near the connector.

They have been soldering wires to metallic tab type terminals forever in just about every type of electronics you can imagine. Wire wound resistors, terminal strips, tube sockets, pots, switches, you name it ! In all these cases the solder wicks up a tiny bit into the wire but certainly does not make a joint susceptible to fatigue unless maybe in extreme enviroments, like a Saturn 5 rocket. Wire flexing near a connection is always a bad thing and should have some mechanical restraint.

The problem with soldering is you have to be very neat about it or the pin won't fit into the shell. Solder can also wick down the pin and tin the actual contact surface which is a bad thing. The crimps became so popular because of their speed and constant shape produced, these things are important in large quantities for manufacturing purposes.

For one servo drive with only a few pins, I would (and have many times) solder the pins in a heartbeat before I would buy a $50 crimp tool. Of course, there is nothing wrong with either the tool or a proper crimp joint.

J Tiers
03-20-2015, 08:21 AM
The OP has stated he has the terminals, and presumably has a crimper......

There are connectors and there are connectors.....

Some have different crimps, but most have the standard sort of "F" crimp, and IIRC thiose have it. There are a large number of different crimpers of various origin that can make those crimps. Molex sells a "universal" crimper with a dozen or so sizes on it. If you want a general purpose crimper, you can do a lot worse than the Molex one, but there are chinese knockoffs as well.

Get the data sheet for the terminal, and then you will KNOW what the correct height of the crimp is. Each terminal is designed to have a certain crimped size measured over the crimp, including the terminal and the wire that is crimped. There is a range of "heights" over which a proper connection has been made.

Too thick, and the terminal is probably loose, or the wire inserted wrong, so the connection is not secure. Too thin, and the wire has been squashed too much, and the connection again is not good, not secure.

Of all people, "we" should have proper equipment to determine the crimp height.......

The insulation crimp is also important, to assure support, and prevent wire breakage.

Soldering, if done neatly, can work. But this particular connector is unsuitable for it. The wire has minimal support from the housing, so the insulation crimp is very important. But soldering is inherently incompatible with a good insulation support, because the insulation is melted by the heat. If the wire is kinked away to prevent that, it must be bent back again before crimping, creating a break-sensitive spot.

Then also, crimping the insulation crimp with pliers is not effective, so the support is bad, and breakage at the wnd of the solder wick area is very common. A proper crimp will outlast the solder in any application where the wires may be wiggled, or the connector removed and replaced.

That's not to say that soldering is not possible, just that it is really more trouble than a good crimp.

DICKEYBIRD
03-20-2015, 08:29 AM
Thanks for all the input gentlemen.:)

I work for an auto dealer & I'm pretty sure we have Molex crimpers in the shop. I'll have to check with the shop foreman & see if I can borrow one. I have several crimpers at home but I checked this morning & they're made for larger pins than these.

lwalker
03-21-2015, 03:41 PM
The problem with that one is for the small connections like these little molex you have almost no choice in sizes. I tend to like to use two different sizes when I crimp, one for the metal on metal crimp and one for the insulation.

There are cheaper ones than the molex, it is just one of the ones I have. There are some pretty decent ones on aliexpress but shipping will take weeks.

Crimping tools are one of those things where I firmly believe you get what you pay for. My AMP/Tyco crimper will crimp both wire and insulation at the same time and make a perfect "B" crimp, but it costs $$$. The one from Hansen Hobbies (they're all over eBay) is 1/4 the price and works OK, but doesn't do insulation well.

Whenever my local auction house has their auctions, I scan the listings for crimpers. I have a couple here that are over $400 new that I got for less than $20. I find that electronics tools go really cheap at machine shop auctions cuz no one wants them.

crrmeyer
03-21-2015, 09:08 PM
Soldering to crimp connectors that are not strain relieved (like a DB backshell) will be high failure if stressed at all.

If you are in the US, you can mail orders to Digikey prepaid (check, money order) and Digikey will ship your order for free with no minimum order amount. It is a really good deal if you have the time.

DICKEYBIRD
03-21-2015, 09:13 PM
If you are in the US, you can mail orders to Digikey prepaid (check, money order) and Digikey will ship your order for free with no minimum order amount. It is a really good deal if you have the time.Wow, I didn't know that, thanks!

DICKEYBIRD
03-26-2015, 01:41 PM
The rest of the story:

Monday afternoon, my bud Jeff that works in the office with me says "quit yer whining & gimme the part number." Click, click, click he finds it at Allied Electronics, gets the phone number from their site & calls them. Gets nice Miss Lisa on the phone & she says "No problem Jeff, you'll have five on Thursday @ n/c. My pleasure & thanks for calling Allied. Have a nice day." He is the proverbial silver-tonged devil though.

BadaBing, BadaBoom, UPS dropped them off this morning. What a country!:cool:

Paul Alciatore
03-26-2015, 05:16 PM
And this is a revelation? I said, TEN posts above, on the 19th that any or ALL of the ELECTRONIC supply houses WILL ship any quantity from ONE to thousands. They do this for anybody, any day and no "silver-tonged" talking required. You don't even need a phone call, you can just order on their web sites.

The electronic parts guys have it together. Others who sell things could look to them for guidance.

DICKEYBIRD
03-26-2015, 08:46 PM
Sorry Paul, I wasn't trying to minimize your helpful post at all.

Revelation? Too me, yes it was. Free goodies & free 2 day shipping was an unusual event for me. Just thought I should mention the good customer service here thinking it might bring them some good will.

It's all good.:)

Mike Nash
03-26-2015, 08:48 PM
And this is a revelation? I said, TEN posts above, on the 19th that any or ALL of the ELECTRONIC supply houses WILL ship any quantity from ONE to thousands. They do this for anybody, any day and no "silver-tonged" talking required. You don't even need a phone call, you can just order on their web sites.

The electronic parts guys have it together. Others who sell things could look to them for guidance.

But you never said any of them would ship you some for free...

J Tiers
03-26-2015, 09:57 PM
If we are complaining about ignoring useful posts, I linked to the parts direct at Digikey.......

And I did it in post #2!

But I'm not complaining..... I have noticed that most folks don't read more than the first sentence of a post anyway...... maybe two or 3 more in the case of a few. So that's about what I expect.

lwalker
03-26-2015, 10:26 PM
But you never said any of them would ship you some for free...

That's pretty standard. They want you to try out their parts so hopefully you will design them into a product and order thousands per month/year.

I have hundreds, if not thousands of dollars in microcontroller development tools (debuggers and evaluation kits) that FSE's (field service engineers) gave me for free. Back when I worked as a design engineer for an electronics company and they actually printed paper databooks, the distributor's reps would drop by and just let us pick whatever we wanted out of the trunk of their cars. Easier than them lugging stuff up the stairs!

Just today I was going through all my old parts wondering if any had value. Anyone need some Brooktree high speed video DACs from the early 90's? Probably not.

Lyndon