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metalbender
04-17-2015, 05:26 PM
Checking out flea bay.. Couple of Cole drills listed. Information only, no interest for me, have one

J Tiers
04-17-2015, 08:51 PM
D'you use it?

What for?

I used mine once, and quickly recognized the need for razor-sharp drills.

metalbender
04-17-2015, 11:01 PM
Just one of those cool to have things. Need it? Hell no. But never know some day it might come in handy. Sharp bits are a must, pilot hole helps a lot. Does work good though. Might have to drill a hole in a boat rail/dolly or a dock in the water. Good answer?

Mcostello
04-18-2015, 09:12 PM
I would like one also, the only thing I could think of to use it on would be to drill a hole in My tractor that is broken down and has a bolt broken off. I would drill a hole in the bolt to have a place to break off an Easy out in.

oldtiffie
04-19-2015, 12:48 AM
It might help some who don't know what a Coles drills drills or works if a pic etc were posted here to assist.

Try these:

https://www.google.com.au/search?q=cole+drill+press&biw=1536&bih=706&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=BTIzVbTyM4LImwWI4YGQAQ&ved=0CEEQsAQ

https://www.google.com.au/?gws_rd=ssl#q=cole+drill+press

Me?

I would not let one onto the property - not even as a gift or if I was paid to do/take it.

J Tiers
04-19-2015, 09:19 AM
Me?

I would not let one onto the property - not even as a gift or if I was paid to do/take it.

They can be pretty handy when you are 9 miles down a logging road, which is 30 miles from town or electric wires. Anyplace where there is electric, I'd not mess with it.

People get pretty used to electricity.... used to be, and not that all-fired long ago, either, that if you had a hole to drill up a tower on some steel somewhere, this, or a similar device, was what you were going to use.

bruto
04-19-2015, 09:40 AM
Different strokes, I guess. I have one and I do use it, if very rarely. Yes, it's slow and a bit rough on your shoulders and if you have electricity available most of the time that's better, but if you need to use a drill press on something you can't put into a drill press, it's very handy to have around. I've used it to drill holes in the metal framework for a dock and lake stairway, for example, which would have been very difficult with a hand held drill. With the Cole it was slow but easy. Also things like drilling my tractor bucket for chain hooks.

A slow hand powered drill wants sharp bits, but it's fairly kind to the bits. I found the same when, for a long time, I used a hand powered drill press. A good sharp carbon steel bit lasts forever.

Given how infrequently I use it, I would not spend big bucks on one, but I'm glad I have it. I bought mine many years ago along with the matching Cole vise (which I do use often), brand new for four bucks. I've probably used the drill for about two hours in thirty years, but when you need it it's good to have.

metalbender
04-19-2015, 10:56 AM
Guy in the video needs to learn how to use it before posting a how to. How awkward does one have to make a simple process?

mklotz
04-19-2015, 11:08 AM
I have the functional equivalent of a Coles to use with a woodworking brace and bit. It's fitted with hooks to attach a chain (missing from mine) that holds the tool against the workpiece.

I've long wondered what the correct name for it is. Anybody know?

And, yes, I've never used it.

oldtiffie
04-19-2015, 06:40 PM
They can be pretty handy when you are 9 miles down a logging road, which is 30 miles from town or electric wires. Anyplace where there is electric, I'd not mess with it.

People get pretty used to electricity.... used to be, and not that all-fired long ago, either, that if you had a hole to drill up a tower on some steel somewhere, this, or a similar device, was what you were going to use.

I don't have that problem as I only work from/at home - mostly.

But if there is no mains power for what ever reason I simply use my very good Honda generator and my bit more modern version of that Coles drill:

http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Med_Speed_Spindles/Metabo_drill3.jpg

http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Med_Speed_Spindles/Metabo_drill1.jpg

http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Med_Speed_Spindles/Metabo_drill2.jpg

http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Med_Speed_Spindles/Metabo_drill3.jpg

And if I had a real need for one I'd hire or buy a good magnetic based drill (preferably with auto feed):

http://www.machineryhouse.com.au/D9505

That generator sure comes in handy when away from the house or shed (here in OZ) /shop (USA).

J Tiers
04-19-2015, 09:20 PM
I don't have that problem as I only work from/at home - mostly.

But if there is no mains power for what ever reason I simply use my very good Honda generator and my bit more modern version of that Coles drill:


I know which one I would rather carry-in a mile or two on my back.......

wierdscience
04-19-2015, 09:52 PM
I've got one and I have used it a few times.Several when drilling truck frames and several more drilling stainless steel flanges for larger bolts.

They do work well with some practice,they will drill tough materials easier and with less effort than a hand held drill and come in handy drilling things a mag drill won't stick to.

oldtiffie
04-20-2015, 12:27 AM
Originally Posted by oldtiffie View Post

I don't have that problem as I only work from/at home - mostly.

But if there is no mains power for what ever reason I simply use my very good Honda generator and my bit more modern version of that Coles drill:

I know which one I would rather carry-in a mile or two on my back.......

Err-r-r.

JT,

I presume you mean you have it on your back when you are vertical.

I did read it as your carrying it with you (and not the machine) "on your back" (ie with you horizontal).

I'm sure glad I got that sorted out.

I reckon you'd have been pretty tired ("F**cked??) enough carrying it into that job let alone setting it up and doing the job and then trekking back out again.

They shore do breed them ruff, tuff 'n' rugged up thar where you come from or where you live.

They must breed 'm' that tough up/over thar they'd rust!!

Nutthin' like that here in OZ that I'm aware of - or maybe our super big trolls got 'em.

J Tiers
04-20-2015, 08:54 AM
Does "backpacking it in to the site" clear that up for you?

The Honda will be a tad heavier......

bruto
04-20-2015, 04:20 PM
I have the functional equivalent of a Coles to use with a woodworking brace and bit. It's fitted with hooks to attach a chain (missing from mine) that holds the tool against the workpiece.

I've long wondered what the correct name for it is. Anybody know?

And, yes, I've never used it.

I think it's usually referred to as a "chain drill." I have several of these, which came in various forms from relatively rudimentary brace chucks to a nickel plated, self feeding, ball bearing machine chuck version from Goodell Pratt. There was a thread on PM about these, and I included a picture of that one: http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/attachments/f19/37874d1315072731-some-old-interesting-drills-goodell-pratt-chain-drill.jpg. Because the Cole drill usually works best, I haven't used these except to try them out and see how they work. It's hard to keep a chain drill straight, but the self feed works pretty well, and gets a hole through thin stock in a pretty good time if you can figure out how to hook it up.

Note on the one shown, by the way, the little star wheel. Every time the bit rotates a revolution, it advances the feed screw. Very cool.

mklotz
04-20-2015, 05:08 PM
Yup, that's it. Thanks for the name for it, too. As confirmation, Google images with the search term "chain drill" produces dozens of images of the tool in question.