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View Full Version : OT: No internet/email/WIFI for a week - Just saying I'm OK and will soon be home



PStechPaul
04-24-2015, 03:53 PM
I had to "sneak out" of rehab to come home to get my computer and on-line access. Their WIFI is borked. I can't stay long - but I should be released officially and back home Sunday or Monday.

C-ya then,

Paul

danlb
04-24-2015, 06:06 PM
Hope you are better soon.

Most rehab programs suck. I've done cardiac and physical rehab. Not fun at all.

Dan.

Evan
04-24-2015, 09:53 PM
Tell me about it. I was in the hospital for 38 days and for three weeks I had no computer access because the unit I was in didn't have Wi-Fi installed. We live in a rather backward part of the medical system in central British Columbia. How backward? The nurses are still writing down everything in the daily medical reports. I mean pencil and paper. No computer system to record the info. Incredible. They aren't even in the 20th century, never mind 21st.

sch
04-24-2015, 11:02 PM
Altho computerized medical records sound hotsy totsy in execution they are a major step backwards in practice. Because of the many things thought desirable to record the HCP are goose-stepped
through a series of mandatory questions and statements interspersed with areas of 'free typed' specifics for the patient. Net result is it takes 20-50% longer to complete a record, compared with
hand writing the same. Thus it can take dozens to hundreds of clicks to complete one patient, then on to the next. Since the machine can't be reasoned with you can not go on to the next patient
til every box is clicked on the present patient, or to say it another way you can't go home at end of shift til all charts are completed.

PStechPaul
04-27-2015, 10:16 PM
I am finally back home, humble though it may be. Today was my birthday and my friend Adrienne brought Muttley to visit with me and Helene, and then after much red tape I was released and now am getting situated. There will be a visiting nurse for a few days and my worry is that s/he may consider my wreck of a house to be unsuitable, but I feel more relaxed now in familiar environs. The therapy was for the most part the best portion of my time.

Today was doubly stressful because of the riots in Baltimore.

I'll post more later. Tired...

tmarks11
04-27-2015, 10:56 PM
Today was doubly stressful because of the riots in Baltimore.
I am glad I moved away from there two years ago and live in the PNW now. It would really stress me out to be anywhere near there.

PStechPaul
04-28-2015, 04:06 PM
Yes, and it was also stressful being in a facility where most of the staff are black. They are good people, and not much a part of the problem, but I'm sure some of them have experienced police brutality and racism and there seems to be a growing attitude of "us vs them", especially among young disadvantaged blacks. Things seemed like they were getting better after the riots of 1968 and I thought the "Summer of Love" and other signs of openness and acceptance and solidarity against the "Military-Industrial Complex" would usher in a new era of peace and equality. But the failed "war on drugs" and the dismal economic outlook for those not equipped for high-tech, along with a general disrespect, lack of manners, and dismissal of moral/ethical values has created a dangerous situation. I don't see much hope for the future without a sea change of social dynamics and "engineering".

As for my condition and prognosis:


I was diagnosed with congenital spinal stenosis in 1989, at which time it mostly
caused lower back and leg pain (and numbness/weakness). There were periods of
time when walking and even sitting and sleeping were painful, and then it would
get better and I could resume activities like volleyball and hiking. About 5
years ago the leg pain got worse and sometimes the right leg would almost give
way, but it was determined that my hip was the main problem. I had it replaced
two years ago and got much better, being able to walk a mile or more, but then
the sciatica worsened to the point where it was painful to walk 1/4 mile. I also
began to have neck pain and numbness/weakness in my arms and hands. MRIs
determined that the stenosis in my neck was perhaps even worse than that in the
lumbar, and I will need both operated on. But the neck had to be done first. It
will be 3-4 weeks before I can remove the neck brace, and drive, and when
I’m well healed I will have to undergo similar multi-level spinal fusion in the
lower back, which may be an even longer recovery, but should relieve or at least
stabilize most of my problems.

PStechPaul
05-01-2015, 12:46 AM
I found a web page with a video of this procedure, although it was made in 2000 and used a metal plate and screws rather than the more recent steel clips that are in my neck:

http://www.spineuniverse.com/conditions/neck-pain/anterior-cervical-discectomy-fusion-anterior

I downloaded the video using ATubeCatcher as a 185 MB WMV file. There are probably some on YouTube as well. This video was rather crude and low-res, probably using an early cell phone. Maybe my doctor might give me a better version. It might be creepy to see me on the table, but once it goes to close-up it is not very bloody or gory and actually is an example of mechanical engineering and machining processes.

http://enginuitysystems.com/pix/ACDF.png

TGTool
05-01-2015, 09:28 AM
Paul,

First, I'm glad to hear the repair went well and trust that will eliminate the problem - that one anyway. I have a friend who underwent that procedure a few years ago. I don't see her often, but the last time I ran into her she was doing great.

It's always interesting seeing the intersection of engineering/machining/medicine. Another friend years ago who was a technician at a hospital developed heart sound microphone that was subsequently patented and sold. It used a tiny nichrome wire with a small current running through it and and air movement (sound waves) were inferred from the temperature change. The mic was a small tube inserted into a cup stuck to the patient's chest, and they made the cups from pipe caps with adhesive on the rim and hole punch in the side.

The video you linked really separates the professionals from the amateurs. I listened to the description of all the steps necessary for preparation but it just looked like raw meat to me. Then again I'm vegetarian so maybe unable to tell the difference.

All the best in recovery, personal and municipal.

Paul Alciatore
05-01-2015, 03:20 PM
One more example of the fact that the developers of these programs/systems do not use them. It's not their time that is being wasted and they just DON'T CARE!

Even when you try to tell them how it should be, they do it THEIR way because they are the computer genius and THEY KNOW how it "SHOULD" be done. Never mind the users.

I have been through a project that involved both equipment design (my job) and integration with computers and custom programming. I had to fight every step of the way to make it usable. Won some, lost some. The project took at least a year longer than it should have due to programming problems - doing it their way.




Altho computerized medical records sound hotsy totsy in execution they are a major step backwards in practice. Because of the many things thought desirable to record the HCP are goose-stepped
through a series of mandatory questions and statements interspersed with areas of 'free typed' specifics for the patient. Net result is it takes 20-50% longer to complete a record, compared with
hand writing the same. Thus it can take dozens to hundreds of clicks to complete one patient, then on to the next. Since the machine can't be reasoned with you can not go on to the next patient
til every box is clicked on the present patient, or to say it another way you can't go home at end of shift til all charts are completed.

Evan
05-01-2015, 07:56 PM
"Altho computerized medical records sound hotsy totsy in execution they are a major step backwards in practice."

Except: I live in a remote area and any visit to any specialist means a drive of at least 300 to 1200 kilometres. That means any paper records must be photocopied or scanned and then forwarded to my local doctor so he has some idea what went on. When on the computer it is nearly instant access anywhere in the province. My doctor didn't get a copy of my records until three weeks after I was back in Williams Lake and I finally just got my copy yesterday. They exceeded the legal time limit for providing my records by two weeks. Now I need to go through the thick stack of pages to make sure they haven't made any more mistakes like I already found while in where they mixed up mine with somebody else, also breaking privacy laws.

The only decent part of our system is the outstanding people we have at the direct patient-nurse level. It quickly goes downhill as you go up the chain of command. Doctors are terrible at communications in all directions and that causes no end of problems including screwing up the availability of my medications several times.

PStechPaul
05-01-2015, 08:19 PM
It is scary and discouraging how often medications and their dosages can be screwed up. I had some trouble swallowing large, dry pills like the Percocet, due to some inflammation caused by intubation and my constant post-nasal drip, but I could break them into two or more pieces and it went down better, especially when accompanied by applesauce (pudding or yogurt would have been better). But the nurse handed me a cup in which she had broken up all of my medications in various size pieces, and it was hard to get down. Some medications must not be crushed as they depend on prolonged dissolution and entry into the bloodstream.

I provided lists of medications and supplements I was taking, several times, and there was an unnecessary and error prone process of my vocal accounts, writing them down on paper, and having them transferred to a computer database, which seems to have been about as good as a bit bucket because I was constantly asked to repeat the information. I don't know if they ever checked with my primary care physician who prescribed them and should know all of them and their dosages.

The doctor at the rehab mostly came by and asked "any pain?", and seemed glad to dispense more Percocet if I so desired, but he seemed too busy to take a minute to discuss other matters of concern. "Keep 'em doped up and quiet" seemed to be the modus operandum. I had been taking Diazepam 5 mg up to 3x daily as needed, but when I asked for a second one he said only once every 24 hours. Yet he prescribed 1 mg Lorazepam every 6 hours PRN. They are similar, but I think the Diazepam is better and the dosage has been OK for me for 30+ years now.