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cfoster
06-15-2004, 11:45 AM
Hello All

Our book of tips, compiled from this forum, for the home shop machinist from other home shop machinists, is underway. This topic was discussed in a previous thread, under Sharing Tips. I have spent countless hours reading through posts from as far back as March of 2001, and let me tell you, there's some good stuff here!

I am posting this to hopefully get some more ideas flowing. Feel free to post any tips and tricks you have discovered during your work. Once a Tip/Trick is selected as a possibility, I will contact the author via email. Pictures are also greatly appreciated. Compensation is in the form of a free copy of the book!

Thank you for your time and help!
Craig

vinito
06-15-2004, 04:10 PM
I can never remember clever things I've done when I'm trying - just can't take the pressure I guess.

But here's one I mentioned in a different post - taught to me at my first job.

"Never put more lube in the cup than you want to have on your shoes"
(referring to the times you're transferring cutting oil out of the tin can with a brush - seems the cup always ends up falling off the machine).

gglines
06-15-2004, 04:20 PM
Craig:

Would you consider addding a Tips/Hints forum to this BBS in addition to the 3 forums you have now? That way, submitters could easily post to that forum instead of looking for a buried tips thread in the General forum.

Thanks,

George

John Stevenson
06-15-2004, 04:29 PM
Good idea George.
Preferably one that works by month and the old months are locked so you have to enter in the current month.

Just having one folder will create massive files.

There also needs to be a rider to say any work placed in that months folder automaticaly grants VP the rights to first publishing rights. This way it stops any future argument that's holding the CD up.

If it were me I'd just go ahead and do it. Wasn't it George Bernard Shaw who said "Publish and be dammed" or was that Van Gogh ??

John S.

John Stevenson
06-15-2004, 04:31 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by cfoster:

Pictures are also greatly appreciated. Compensation is in the form of a free copy of the book!

Thank you for your time and help!
Craig

</font>

Do you get two books for two tips ? http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif

Rustybolt
06-15-2004, 06:12 PM
Tip No. 1

Always excuse yourself before the bill comes.

IOWOLF
06-15-2004, 07:53 PM
CUTE ONE RUSTYB.

HERE IS ONE I USED TODAY, USE 1" METAL BANDING TO HOLD YOUR PARRALLELS ON YOUR MILL VISE AND IN PLACE, IT HAS SPRING IN THEM. BEND THEM LIKE THIS...

-----------------------
/ \
\__ __/


wrap them across the parralels and hook them on the back of the jaws , they are a little wider than the kurt type vise.

IOWOLF
06-15-2004, 07:54 PM
oops it didnt come out.

dvk
06-15-2004, 08:02 PM
If you have one of those screwless vices the
ones that are 7" long I found that the groove cut at the back of these vices will allow a parrallel to sink down a few thous. so I put my smallest parrallel in that groove, then I proceed with the two parrallells I need to raise the workpiece.
That way both working parrallels stay at the same height.

cfoster
06-16-2004, 07:55 AM
Good Morning everyone,

The idea of a permanant tips/tricks area of this forum is one that Neil has been kicking around for some time. It would be a helpful idea, as the larger posts are ones that would be very useful for the book. Basically, some pretty detailed description and some good pictures are the backbone of what we're looking for. and sorry John, no multiple books http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//frown.gif Please don't be discouraged, though. I want to use a lot of the ones you've posted. that is, of course, as long as you don't mind. http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif Thanks to all for the thoughts.

Craig

Lynn Standish
06-16-2004, 10:56 AM
""Never put more lube in the cup than you want to have on your shoes"
(referring to the times you're transferring cutting oil out of the tin can with a brush - seems the cup always ends up falling off the machine)."

I keep brush and oil in a small can at the right end of the chip tray where it's usually out of the way. In addition, I drop a salvaged rare earth computer magnet (very strong) in the bottom of the can (cup). This holds the cup securely on the lathe and draws any chips off the brush.

John Stevenson
06-16-2004, 11:21 AM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by cfoster:
Good Morning everyone,

sorry John, no multiple books http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//frown.gif Please don't be discouraged, though. I want to use a lot of the ones you've posted. that is, of course, as long as you don't mind. http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//smile.gif Thanks to all for the thoughts.

Craig</font>

Rejected, Refused and Neglected,

Who's turn is it to sulk this week ?
When's my turn ?.................

Well I can always throw something at next doors cat..................that should cheer me up.

John S.

motorworks
06-16-2004, 04:12 PM
Just an idea,so no one take offence:
In the tips book why not add a little humour and a small amount politics of the day and some pics.That way the reader could get a full rounded view of the characters here at the home shop.
I can see a young person 40 years from now asking the following:
1)What's meat loaf and why was Thrud's sister's so bad!
2)Where did Carl get all those pics
3)Did John and Alistair ever get along
4)Was there really a place in Newfoundland called Dildo and did they make...
5)Did you see that pic of Evan running that machine with no shirt
6)Did Forest ever give a short answer to a question?
7) Did ibewgypsie get his cnc mill to run and how many boards did he blow
8)wierdscience .Where did he get his name?
etc. etc. etc. ...

I have aways come to the home shop site for the machining info, but I stay for the FUN that goes on here.
Just a thought
e

darryl
06-16-2004, 04:24 PM
For the evenest tan, spend a minimum five hours a day, eight days a week, at the lathe. Without your shirt on, of course.

John Stevenson
06-16-2004, 07:44 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by motorworks:
Just an idea,so no one take offence:
In the tips book why not add a little humour and a small amount politics of the day and some pics.That way the reader could get a full rounded view of the characters here at the home shop.
I can see a young person 40 years from now asking the following:

3)Did John and Alistair ever get along

</font>

No 'cause he's a tight Scots git.

John S.

wierdscience
06-16-2004, 08:21 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by motorworks:
8)wierdscience .Where did he get his name?
etc. etc. etc. ...

[/B]</font>
I'll have you know,my Father gave me my name,and I'll thank you not to wear it out http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//biggrin.gif http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net//tongue.gif



[This message has been edited by wierdscience (edited 06-16-2004).]

Paul Alciatore
06-16-2004, 09:51 PM
<font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Lynn Standish:
""Never put more lube in the cup than you want to have on your shoes"
(referring to the times you're transferring cutting oil out of the tin can with a brush - seems the cup always ends up falling off the machine)."

I keep brush and oil in a small can at the right end of the chip tray where it's usually out of the way. In addition, I drop a salvaged rare earth computer magnet (very strong) in the bottom of the can (cup). This holds the cup securely on the lathe and draws any chips off the brush.

</font>

I like the magnet idea to keep the chips out of the brush. I've been having that problem and have already added magnets to my "cups". I may get some stronger ones to help hold it in place as suggested. As for spilling the oil/cutting fluid, here's a much better solution (pictures as suggested):

http://img18.photobucket.com/albums/v55/EPAIII/NoSpillComp2.jpg

I haven't spilled more than a few drops since I bought two of these. And I do knock them over all the time.

All the usual disclaimers. Just a good product that I actually use.

Paul A.