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View Full Version : OT Clog Hog drain cleaner attachment for a pressure washer.



Dave C
06-23-2015, 07:34 PM
I've seen these things advertised on the back pages of magazines for years. I'm wondering if anyone has tried one, or better yet, made one themselves?
Several years ago a professional pumped out my septic tank, and ran a similar gizmo through the main line from the house to the tank, and from the tank into the field line. He showed me the hose tip, which had a forward facing jet, and several, radially spaced, rear facing jets that pushed the hose through the pipe while blasting away crud. I was impressed by how well it worked, and thought that if I ever bought a pressure washer, I could make something similar and clean my own pipes. Now, 20 years later we are having issues with the washing machine drain and the idea has come to light again. I looked up the ClogHog website to see if they have a nozzle that would fit my pressure washer hose, but discovered that they do not sell one separately. They only sell a hose and nozzle assembly. So, I'm back to the idea of turning one out myself, and wondering if anyone else has done that, or has any ideas as to what size the jets should be, the diameter of the nozzle, or any other pertinent things that I haven't thought of.

Guido
06-23-2015, 09:17 PM
No chore for a stepper-------all depends on how much HHP (hydraulic horse power) you have available. Google 'Line Mole' for tons of ideas of how to machine 'yer own.

'Airport runway rubber removal' can also bring you up to speed.

Be safe.

--G

true temper
06-23-2015, 10:57 PM
You might want to check this out. https://www.dultmeier.com/prod-search.php

Edit, go to site and search sewer nozzle,

Boostinjdm
06-24-2015, 03:56 AM
Plumbers around here call them jetters. One told me where I could buy just the end, but I don't recall it at the moment. Granger's maybe?

velocette
06-24-2015, 04:15 AM
Hi
Why not use the water supply to your house. Our town water is over 4 bar or 60 PSI.
I use brass fitting on a garden hose with a fabricated with rear facing jets 2 mm with 6 off and a forward facing 3 mm jet that has been in intermittent use for over 40 years clearing the crud from the storm water drains at home and on loan to friends.

Eric

oldtiffie
06-24-2015, 04:29 AM
https://www.google.com.au/search?sourceid=navclient&aq=&oq=g&hl=en-GB&ie=UTF-8&rlz=1T4IRFC_enAU360AU360&q=google&gs_l=hp..5.0l5j41l3.0.0.0.4583...........0.rzsnh1X TVEo#hl=en-AU&q=ClogHog

https://www.google.com.au/search?q=google&rls=com.microsoft:en-AU:IE-SearchBox&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&sourceid=ie7&rlz=1I7IRFC_enAU360&gfe_rd=cr&ei=U12KVZeQIqju8weQlL_YBQ&gws_rd=ssl#q=pressure+drain+cleaner

I've seen and was most impressed with the large truck-mounted commercial drainage cleaners that really can do thejob - including cutting tree-root drain infestation up to say 8"ort more diameter/bore.

They not only clean the drain but can give a very comprehensive written and video report of the condition of the drain and pits etc. as well as pumping out and removing all debris from the site.

The owner then knows the condition of the drain/s as well as a comprehensive indicative scope of remedial works as well as times and costs etc.

Not surprisingly, it is not cheap by any means.

awemawson
06-24-2015, 06:35 AM
I have one of those heads for my pressure washer - bought it when I got the Karcher and that must be 15-18 years ago. Only used it a few times but it certainly works.

Key is to have more coming out of the rear holes to push it forwards than the forward facing ones as it has to drag the weight of the hose behind it. I think mine has three forwards facing and about six or eight rearwards facing, all being sub millimetre iirc

Doozer
06-24-2015, 11:09 AM
I used to work with my father in his retail store service business.
We got a call for a clogged toilet at a shoe store.
Right next door to the shoe store was a Chinese food place.
What always happens is, the Chinese food places NEVER clean
their grease traps, and they pour grease right down the drain.
So we go out and snake the toilet, no good. Pull the cleanout
plug outside, run the big snake in, no good. Still clogged.
Call the Erie county sewer authority and they send a truck out.
They had a snake with a high pressure water blaster and also
had a camera. Pretty high tech tool. So they go and snake
the drain from the cleanout. They go until they can go any
further. Camera shows the drain is packed with grease and
Chinese noodles. (Of course!). They turn on the pressure
blaster on low. No good. They up the pressure a bit more,
still clogged. Then they turn the water blaster up to 3000 psi.
That broke up the clog. Clear as day. Great!
Went back to check the toilet in the bathroom of the shoe store,
and the toilet had exploded!!! There was poop and Chinese
noodles and grease all over every wall in the bathroom!
Enough to make you throw up multiple times. We took pictures
of the whole mess and the pics from the sewer cam and sent them
to the broker. We charged the heck out of that job and the broker
sent the bill to the Chinese restaurant.

--Doozer

ironmonger
06-24-2015, 11:15 AM
<<snip>>

Key is to have more coming out of the rear holes to push it forwards than the forward facing ones as it has to drag the weight of the hose behind it. I think mine has three forwards facing and about six or eight rearwards facing, all being sub millimetre iirc

The key is to introduce the jet from downstream of the clog. The big units are mainly used manhole to manhole. It's tough to go upstream from a cleanout out if there is a teewye at the bottom, somewhat do-able with a tee on its back.

The objective is to have most of the stream directed down-slope to carry away the debris that the front jet breaks loose, and have the jets scrub the pipe walls. It needs to have somewhere to go...

paul

DICKEYBIRD
06-24-2015, 02:00 PM
....we are having issues with the washing machine drain....Water backing up during the drain-rinse-spin cycle has always been (in my house) a clogged drain line going across the front yard near a tree. The washer pumps out a lot of water in a short period of time & it backs up.

Short term patch job: a piece of radiator hose on the drain pipe in the wall to raise the washer's drain hose & give it more time to drain. The fix is Mr. Rooter coming out & running his magic gnasher gizmo down the drain pipe to grind up the mass of roots.

Rosco-P
06-24-2015, 02:27 PM
Water backing up during the drain-rinse-spin cycle has always been (in my house) a clogged drain line going across the front yard near a tree. The washer pumps out a lot of water in a short period of time & it backs up.

Short term patch job: a piece of radiator hose on the drain pipe in the wall to raise the washer's drain hose & give it more time to drain. The fix is Mr. Rooter coming out & running his magic gnasher gizmo down the drain pipe to grind up the mass of roots.

You could use one of the copper bearing root destroying chemicals in the mean time. But they do take time to kill back the root mass invading the sewer line.

Dave C
06-24-2015, 04:26 PM
Thanks to all for your input. I'm going to run down to the Harbor Freight store and get one of those balloon things that attaches to a garden hose, and see if it will do any good. If it doesn't, then I will whip up a nozzle to go on the pressure washer and blast away. The washing machine drain and the kitchen sink share the same 2 1/2" cast iron drain pipe. It runs under the slab, the width of the house and exits the slab, below the outside wall. It then runs about 50 ft. to the sewage treatment plant. There are no tree roots involved, but the clog is probably a combination of grease from the sink, and lint from the washer. The wife likes using the garbage disposer like she did when we lived in town. A few years ago, I cut the cast pipe just outside the wall, and installed a section of PVC with rubber connectors so it can be removed for cleaning access. A garden hose shoved into the pipe cleared the line, but doing that again would involve digging it up, and making a mess, which I would rather avoid if possible.

Dave C
06-29-2015, 02:09 PM
Well, the balloon thing didn't work. I think the goofy way the plumbing is arranged, allowed the pressure to go up the air vent. I wound up digging up the walkway to access the removable section and pushing a high pressure nozzle equipped garden hose into both sections of the pipe. I was a nasty mess. There was no solid material in the pipes, but the walls were coated with some stinky, jelly like, black stuff. Once the pipes were thoroughly rinsed out, the removable section was replaced, and the washing machine run through a complete cycle. No overflow this time. Ta-da. Now on to filling the hole and repairing the walkway.