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Willy
07-05-2015, 01:29 PM
OT but it is metal related at least.
I have used a lot of cast iron cookware over the years and have always liked using cast iron and have never had any issues, until now that is.

Just acquired a new skillet that although it came pre-seasoned left a horrible taste on the food and smell in the kitchen. I have since tried everything that worked in the past to no avail.
I have tried to season it while cooking various goodies like bacon, garlic, hash browns, onions, etc. and still it, and the food cooked in it, stinks. A scrub with melted butter and salt makes no difference.
I'm just about ready to retire it because at this point I don't think I want to waste any more good food on it.

Oh yes, before anyone asks, it is Chinese.:) Could there be something in the metal that would affect the taste? I'm open to suggestions.

dp
07-05-2015, 01:38 PM
I had a similar fry pan problem. To complicate things it has a wooden handle. I removed the handle and put the pan in my self-cleaning oven and ran the cycle. That burned off all of what ever was on it. I then warmed it over the cook top with a thin layer of peanut oil in it. I brought the temperature up to produce a lot of smoke then dumped the oil and put the pan under a stream of hot water. Repeated 3 times, dried it off and let it cool. It's been perfect since and that's lasted over 25 years.

JRouche
07-05-2015, 02:57 PM
Those pre-seasoned pans are not to be used with food. Its more to keep them from rusting on the slow boat ride... If you have a BBQ throw it in there for a while till she turns white and all that coating is burnt off. Then start over and season it like you normally would. I love my cast iron pans. JR

KJ1I
07-05-2015, 03:29 PM
I, too, love my cast iron.

My standard procedure is similar to dp's: I put new pans (pre-seasoned or not) in the oven and run the self clean cycle. I let the pan cool in the oven after the cycle is complete, then wash with soap and warm water. Next, I coat the pan, inside and out, with solid shortening and cook it in a 500 degree oven for 1 hour. I'll repeat the coat and cook until I like the color of the seasoning, then use.

JoeLee
07-05-2015, 04:04 PM
I too love my CI pans. I never scour them or use detergent, just rinse and scrape clean. They will eventually become seasoned just from every day use.

JL..............

snipe
07-05-2015, 04:28 PM
I just throw mine in the woodstove, cook them clean and then season them by cooking with them. Beef fat seems to seal the best.

Willy
07-05-2015, 04:38 PM
Those pre-seasoned pans are not to be used with food. Its more to keep them from rusting on the slow boat ride... If you have a BBQ throw it in there for a while till she turns white and all that coating is burnt off. Then start over and season it like you normally would. I love my cast iron pans. JR

I'm thinking this is where I may have gone wrong. I have always started with unseasoned cast iron and seasoned them myself and have had no issues until now. This being my first pre-seasoned one all I did is wipe it clean and then filled it with water, bring to a boil, drain and repeat a few times.
I also gave it my usual butter and salt scrub, (the salt works as a good abrasive) several times after trying to overwhelm the taste with bacon, garlic, and onions numerous times. I should have realized that once the original seasoning cocktail was in the pores of the cast iron the only positive way to clean the skillet would have been heat, lots of it.


I'm thinking they used the same stuff to pre-season as they use on their tooling, it smells about the same.:)
Sounds like it's time to burn off the smelly "flavor" and start with a clean slate.

HWooldridge
07-05-2015, 04:57 PM
Agree with the other posters - I pick up CI cookware all the time from yard sales and have only had one small frying pan that I left alone because the seasoning looked OK as-is. The rest all get put into the kitchen oven and run through the self-cleaning cycle. I then re-season and use to my heart's content...:cool:

Mike Nash
07-05-2015, 06:06 PM
Agree with the other posters - I pick up CI cookware all the time from yard sales and have only had one small frying pan that I left alone because the seasoning looked OK as-is. The rest all get put into the kitchen oven and run through the self-cleaning cycle. I then re-season and use to my heart's content...:cool:

But then there's this type of thing
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xwrAsNdODnE

Maybe used isn't such a great idea for cookware.

CarlByrns
07-05-2015, 06:37 PM
Right here Willy-
https://www.lodgemfg.com/use-and-care/seasoned-cast-iron-use-and-care.asp

This is how I do mine after blackened fish (which burns all the old oils off).

Charles Spencer
07-05-2015, 07:33 PM
"Maybe used isn't such a great idea for cookware."

Umm, I cook with cast iron as well. However, I also have a small skillet that I use on a hotplate to melt scrap lead. I then make "ingots" by pouring it into a mini muffin tin.

I don't really cook with either of those pans.

2ManyHobbies
07-05-2015, 10:26 PM
To fix and re-season cast iron...
1) Burn it out. Set it in an oven on self-clean, heat it up on a grill, stick it in a forge, etc.
2) Let it cool then clean it. Blow out any dust/ash, then using insanely hot water and a stiff bristle brush (not metal!) scrub it inside and out.
3) Dry it off. If the cast iron and water were hot enough, you won't have any rust spots. Dabbing/blotting large water concentrations with a towel can't hurt.
4) Coat it in food grade flax seed oil. Go as thin as possible, you don't want it gummy. Rub it in with a paper towel. If the paper towel turns brown, you're rubbing rust off so keep adding oil, changing paper towels, and rubbing until it isn't giving up any more rust.
5) Heat it up and let it smoke out. 400F in an oven works or on the grill, just keep an eye on it and don't let it burn out (you'll have to start over).
6) Repeat steps 4-5 several times until any new flax seed oil beads up and will not coat uniformly.

Congratulations, you've now got a seasoned piece of cast iron that will stand up to a great deal of abuse so long as you don't burn it out again or attempt to boil vinegar in it. To clean, add hot water and scrub with a stiff bristle brush (not metal) while the metal is still hot. Touch up with flax seed oil and smoke out as needed.

smalltime
07-05-2015, 10:31 PM
Oh yes, before anyone asks, it is Chinese

Return it for a refund. NOW

Go to your local ACE hardware store and get a "Lodge" brand skillet. Follow package directions for seasoning.

Royldean
07-06-2015, 07:40 AM
Go to your local ACE hardware store and get a "Lodge" brand skillet. Follow package directions for seasoning.

Believe it or not, you can get US made Lodge stuff from Walmart, as well. I have one of their big griddles, which came pre-seasoned.... and was a delight to use even from the beginning. No need to burn off anything and re-season.

Rosco-P
07-06-2015, 08:00 AM
To fix and re-season cast iron...
1) Burn it out. Set it in an oven on self-clean, heat it up on a grill, stick it in a forge, etc.


Absolutely terrible idea(s). Excessive heat can ruin, pit or warp and otherwise a good skillet. If you have acquired an extremely filthy used pan, electrolytic will lift off all the old seasoning without any damage.

http://www.castironcollector.com/cleaning.php

Gazz
07-06-2015, 10:03 AM
I like using cast iron stuff to cook with and pretty much use nothing but Griswald stuff. Most of them came from yard sales and many of those also come with a thick layer or carbonized nastiness on the outside surfaces and sometimes on the inside as well. I clean these in one of two ways, either heating them evenly until red hot with the large rosebud heating tip of my oxy/propane torch or by putting them in a campfire and letting them slow cook until the crust burns off. I have never had any problems with warping or cracking. After the burn off, I oil them up with olive oil, both the inside and outside. To clean after use, I put a bit of water in them and heat on the stove and then scrub them out - never use any soap. Remember that dutch ovens are made to placed in the coals to cook whatever you have in them. Just don't quench them when hot like that.

cameron
07-06-2015, 10:13 AM
Absolutely terrible idea(s). Excessive heat can ruin, pit or warp and otherwise a good skillet. If you have acquired an extremely filthy used pan, electrolytic will lift off all the old seasoning without any damage.

http://www.castironcollector.com/cleaning.php

If you've tried this, and it works, you know better than I do. I've usually found that grease, oil and tightly adherent paint insulate the surface and slow down or prevent electrolysis. Maybe there's enough carbon in the seasoning to provide conduction?

I think boiling the pan in strong lye would do a better job of cleaning it, but I haven't tried it.

bob_s
07-06-2015, 10:16 AM
OT but it is metal related at least.
...
Oh yes, before anyone asks, it is Chinese.:) Could there be something in the metal that would affect the taste? I'm open to suggestions.

depleted uranium?

Rosco-P
07-06-2015, 10:21 AM
If you've tried this, and it works, you know better than I do. I've usually found that grease, oil and tightly adherent paint insulate the surface and slow down or prevent electrolysis. Maybe there's enough carbon in the seasoning to provide conduction?

I think boiling the pan in strong lye would do a better job of cleaning it, but I haven't tried it.

Yes, just cleaned up four estate sale pans the other day. Each of which was so caked on bottom, handle and inside that no markings were visible. All the residue was lifted in the electrolytic bath with just washing soda and a 10A charger in a few hours. A spray from the garden hose and I had bare grey cast iron ready for seasoning.

Extreme methods just aren't necessary.

Black Forest
07-06-2015, 10:50 AM
When I had to re-season a cast iron pan or pot I just sand blasted it and put olive oil on it and smoked it out. I don't know if that is the best way but it was my way! Of course I had 1000CFM compressors to run my pots so it was real easy.

metalmagpie
07-06-2015, 02:23 PM
Another CI (mostly Griswold) fan here. Electrolytic derusting works for sure, I've also sandblasted and started over. And have cleaned off campfire crud with a wire wheel/angle grinder. And just warmed up and rubbed with oil and paper towels. And I season with Crisco and the oven. And yes you damn sure can warp cast iron by overheating.

BTW I've slowly been replacing my mom's old cookware with Griswold. About 40% lighter, and they don't lose their value.

metalmagpie

Mike Hunter
07-06-2015, 02:30 PM
I would be cautious about cast iron cook wear from China, especially if it leaves an odor/taste that you can’t wash out.
Remember:
Toys imported from china with lead paint.
Chinese Dog Food contaminated with melamine causing dogs/cats to die as a result of kidney failure
Chinese drywall off gassing carbon disulfide, carbonyl sulfide, and hydrogen sulfide, causing all sorts of health issues and causing all sorts of havoc with copper pipes, wiring, and air conditioners.

Rosco-P
07-06-2015, 02:43 PM
I would be cautious about cast iron cook wear from China, especially if it leaves an odor/taste that you can’t wash out.
Remember:
Toys imported from china with lead paint.
Chinese Dog Food contaminated with melamine causing dogs/cats to die as a result of kidney failure
Chinese drywall off gassing carbon disulfide, carbonyl sulfide, and hydrogen sulfide, causing all sorts of health issues and causing all sorts of havoc with copper pipes, wiring, and air conditioners.

You left out infant formula fortified with melamine to create a bogus protein percentage.

http://www.who.int/csr/media/faq/QAmelamine/en/

Willy
07-06-2015, 03:14 PM
I would be cautious about cast iron cook wear from China, especially if it leaves an odor/taste that you can’t wash out.
.............

This is why I mentioned the Chinese pedigree of the skillet.

Last night I put that stinky thing on the Coleman stove outside and it did come out nice and clean.
Later this week when I get some time I'll probably smooth up the finish in the bottom a bit to enhance the inherently non-stick features that a well seasoned pan usually exhibits. Then I'll season it as I've always done in the past. Basically just a variation of all the good suggestions left here already.
After that I'll give it a breakfast test at which point I'll know if it was that horrible pre-seasoning cosmoline they used or something in the metal itself.

vincemulhollon
07-06-2015, 05:21 PM
Excessive heat can ruin, pit or warp and otherwise a good skillet.

One strategy I use is putting newer stuff on the cast iron grill of my BBQ, which hasn't warped in a zillion hours of use, so I feel safe baking out CI pans at that apparently low enough temp. Also the lower grill which holds the red hot coals is CI and it doesn't warp, nor does the dutch oven, so I feel pretty OK about charcoal cleaning of CI.

Another strategy is when I buy used, its 2015, by 2015 all used CI has gone thru someone's self cleaning oven cycle if not mine or my MiL or grandma or someone's oven, so if its old and not warped its likely good in an oven self clean or it would have been destroyed 25 years ago or whatever.

I do follow sane heating and cooling rules, never toss cold iron into a hot oven or dunk hot iron in water. I let it cool in the oven with the door closed, I'm not completely crazy. I don't use forced draft to heat, or cutting torches.

I admit its theoretically possible to warp it, but in practice I find it highly unlikely.

Something else to think about is I can buy about 3 pieces of CI for the price of one disposable value engineered to quickly fail name brand non-stick, or about ten pieces of CI for the cost of my stainless steel all clad pan, so when I warp my first CI, however annoyed I'll be, at least they'll be no financial impact. I can't stand buying "made to fail" non-stick so its all CI (or stainless) for me for many years now.

While you got the crud burned off, check the mold lines and edges. Never fails to amaze me that my grandma used a frying pan from 1945 for about half a century and never got the mold burr removed. Five minutes with the angle grinder and you're all good for the next half century of use.

sasquatch
07-06-2015, 05:44 PM
No question, i'd be taking it back, and leaving it there, refund or not!! Then buy American cast, new or used, , used can be cleaned up as posted, great stuff , will last another couple of generations.

goose
07-06-2015, 05:45 PM
Something else to think about is I can buy about 3 pieces of CI for the price of one disposable value engineered to quickly fail name brand non-stick, or about ten pieces of CI for the cost of my stainless ...


The cost of cookware is perhaps the least important consideration for me when it comes to cooking, especially considering a little bottle of paprika is $6 and ribeye is $10 a pound on sale.

As for you guys with the sandblasters, rosebud tip oxy/acetylene torches, angle grinders and so forth, go ahead and knock yourself out. But in the end there is also an economy of time, and spending half a day on some garage sale find isn't what I like to do in the kitchen. And it's also kind of gross using someone else's old pots and pans.

Black_Moons
07-06-2015, 06:26 PM
I would be cautious about cast iron cook wear from China, especially if it leaves an odor/taste that you can’t wash out.
Remember:
Toys imported from china with lead paint.
Chinese Dog Food contaminated with melamine causing dogs/cats to die as a result of kidney failure
Chinese drywall off gassing carbon disulfide, carbonyl sulfide, and hydrogen sulfide, causing all sorts of health issues and causing all sorts of havoc with copper pipes, wiring, and air conditioners.

Dog food? How about melamine flavored *baby formula*? 8 deaths, 53,000 hospitalized. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2008_Chinese_milk_scandal

Don't expect that just because it is intended for human food use, that it is fit for human food use. companies in china will manufacture anything its CEO tells them to make, regardless how dangerous/insane/criminal it is.

bob_s
07-06-2015, 06:40 PM
Reminds me of the Mexican manufactured radioactive lawn furniture from however long ago.
Seems that disposed of radiation treatment equipment from the US ended up in scrap iron processed in Mexico.

Glug
07-06-2015, 07:18 PM
But in the end there is also an economy of time, and spending half a day on some garage sale find isn't what I like to do in the kitchen.

No cookware made today, that I am aware of, is comparable to vintage Griswold. Those are great castings (pre WWII). I like cooking on something someone used a hundred years ago. Especially if belonged to a family member.

My big Lodge pan was extremely coarse from the sand casting and it helped a lot to smooth it.

I'm not so sure about the use of olive oil for seasoning. It has a low smoke point and goes rancid pretty quickly. That's the only thing I ever use Crisco for.

Rosco-P
07-06-2015, 07:38 PM
Dog food? How about melamine flavored *baby formula*? 8 deaths, 53,000 hospitalized. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2008_Chinese_milk_scandal

Don't expect that just because it is intended for human food use, that it is fit for human food use. companies in china will manufacture anything its CEO tells them to make, regardless how dangerous/insane/criminal it is.

Careful Black Moons....you don't want the Left-coast Sino apologist to pop up and raise a stink about your post.

ironmonger
07-06-2015, 07:42 PM
I found this thread (http://sherylcanter.com/wordpress/2010/01/a-science-based-technique-for-seasoning-cast-iron/) to be an interesting take on seasoning.

One other way to get the dark color is to clean the pan of all oil and seasoning, obliviously not a recommended procedure if the pan is pale but seasoned well. After the pan is bare metal, heat it in the oven an 450 for an hour and then let it cool while exposed to the air. I do mine on a stove top. Sort of like 'torch' bluing small parts. Here is another take (http://sherylcanter.com/wordpress/2010/02/black-rust-and-cast-iron-seasoning/) from the science lady.

The flax oil stinks like linseed oil, but the health food store stuff is non toxic, I'm not patient enough to use Sheryl's 6 trip method, but it works with 2 or 3 coats.

bon appetit

paul

wierdscience
07-06-2015, 11:45 PM
I haven't tried Flax seed oil yet,but I have used Cotton seed oil with excellent results.Have also noticed that the smoother the cast is to start with the better the end result works.

Cleaning,I have used sandblasting for rusty pots and pans followed by cheap aerosol oven cleaner,the cheaper the better (usually lists sodium hydroxide(lye) and propellant as the ingredients) followed by hot water and Dawn detergent rinse.

kendall
07-07-2015, 07:24 AM
As for you guys with the sandblasters, rosebud tip oxy/acetylene torches, angle grinders and so forth, go ahead and knock yourself out. But in the end there is also an economy of time, and spending half a day on some garage sale find isn't what I like to do in the kitchen. And it's also kind of gross using someone else's old pots and pans.

I agree that some people spend too much time on things. But using someone's old cookware being gross? You don't keep your own personal eating utensils in your pocket do you?

gvasale
07-07-2015, 08:43 AM
"But using someone's old cookware being gross?" Who's cookware prepared your last restaurant dinner?
Properly washed, makes no difference.

wierdscience
07-07-2015, 09:28 AM
"But using someone's old cookware being gross?" Who's cookware prepared your last restaurant dinner?
Properly washed, makes no difference.

Oh,now there you go,injecting logic into this discussion :D

goose
07-07-2015, 11:41 AM
Oh,now there you go,injecting logic into this discussion :D

It's not a matter of logic, it's a matter of drawing a line. Food prepared at a restaurant is one thing, used cookware at garage sales another. I don't mind sleeping on a mattress at a hotel, but I'm not about to buy an old mattress for my bed. Nor am I going buy second hand clothes, nor going to pick old paper cups out of the trash.

Some things are just pathetic, and you draw the line.

gvasale
07-07-2015, 12:47 PM
FWIW, I will buy decent kitchen stuff second hand within limits. Grundgy toaster ovens... not worth it.

I got a really nice ss pot big enough for 5lb lobster a while back for a song. 3 weeks ago, a Frederich Dick(German made) 10" chef's knife, like new for $5.00, and a decent Chef's Choice knife sharpener for $10.

The knife, shows up at $90.00 on the web, the knife sharpener at $100.

Some things are gloatworthy just like tools.

I have my family's old cast iron skillets but am hesitant to use them on a smooth top range.

R.Bolte.Jr
07-07-2015, 12:58 PM
I'll jump on the bandwagon here.
I love my CI cookware. The bulk of it is a 4 pan set that my grandmother got as a wedding present, close to 85- years ago, handed down. I use at least one of them everyday. I like to find nasty looking pieces at yard sales, cheap, to add to my collection.
My method of cleanup uses very little heat. I can't use the self cleaning oven trick, it emits fumes from the interior coating of the oven that will kill my girlfriends parrots! (apparently teflon does that, google it, makes you wonder what it does to US)

Anyway, preheat the pan to 200 degrees in the oven, take it out on the deck and liberally coat with oven cleaner, let sit 20 minutes and rinse thoroughly, wipe with paper towels, repeat the whole process until bare metal. Wash thoroughly with detergent and rinse. Season by heating to 350 on the stovetop, hit it liberally with canola cooking spray. Wipe out the excess cooking spray, fry a 1/2lb of bacon. Enjoy a BLT as you gaze on your good as new pan.

wierdscience
07-07-2015, 01:01 PM
It's not a matter of logic, it's a matter of drawing a line. Food prepared at a restaurant is one thing, used cookware at garage sales another. I don't mind sleeping on a mattress at a hotel, but I'm not about to buy an old mattress for my bed. Nor am I going buy second hand clothes, nor going to pick old paper cups out of the trash.

Some things are just pathetic, and you draw the line.

That's funny,I won't sleep on a hotel mattress period,I always bring some clean sheets with me given what people do on hotel mattresses.

I won't buy plastic cookware or dishes,but stainless,copper and cast iron?Certainly.To not buy a 12" Griswold skillet for $4 because it's used is just plain paranoid.

HWooldridge
07-07-2015, 02:21 PM
No cookware made today, that I am aware of, is comparable to vintage Griswold. Those are great castings (pre WWII). I like cooking on something someone used a hundred years ago. Especially if belonged to a family member.

My big Lodge pan was extremely coarse from the sand casting and it helped a lot to smooth it.

I'm not so sure about the use of olive oil for seasoning. It has a low smoke point and goes rancid pretty quickly. That's the only thing I ever use Crisco for.

I agree that quality of casting has certainly changed over the years. The pan I mentioned earlier in this thread which didn't need seasoning was a small 8" Wagner - the finish on the inside was smooth as the proverbial infant's posterior. A little oil and it slips eggs as cleanly as the best modern non-slip.

And I don't worry about getting one that was previously used for casting lead or other noxious pastimes since you can usually tell from the source whether it was valued as cookware. I have a cheap old Dutch oven which I've used to cast lead and the appearance is horrible. I'll be breaking it when the time comes to remove from useful service and it will never go into a yard sale as a cooking device.

kendall
07-07-2015, 04:40 PM
That's funny,I won't sleep on a hotel mattress period,I always bring some clean sheets with me given what people do on hotel mattresses.

I won't buy plastic cookware or dishes,but stainless,copper and cast iron?Certainly.To not buy a 12" Griswold skillet for $4 because it's used is just plain paranoid.

I always bring my sleeping bag.

Black_Moons
07-07-2015, 07:16 PM
I'll jump on the bandwagon here.
I love my CI cookware. The bulk of it is a 4 pan set that my grandmother got as a wedding present, close to 85- years ago, handed down. I use at least one of them everyday. I like to find nasty looking pieces at yard sales, cheap, to add to my collection.
My method of cleanup uses very little heat. I can't use the self cleaning oven trick, it emits fumes from the interior coating of the oven that will kill my girlfriends parrots! (apparently teflon does that, google it, makes you wonder what it does to US)


Burning some butter in a pan will kill her parrots too. Birds have extremely sensitive respiratory systems and very fast metabolism. That is why miners used canaries to detect gases like CO. The bird would die long before it was a danger to miners.

vpt
07-07-2015, 07:29 PM
I agree that quality of casting has certainly changed over the years. The pan I mentioned earlier in this thread which didn't need seasoning was a small 8" Wagner - the finish on the inside was smooth as the proverbial infant's posterior. A little oil and it slips eggs as cleanly as the best modern non-slip.

And I don't worry about getting one that was previously used for casting lead or other noxious pastimes since you can usually tell from the source whether it was valued as cookware. I have a cheap old Dutch oven which I've used to cast lead and the appearance is horrible. I'll be breaking it when the time comes to remove from useful service and it will never go into a yard sale as a cooking device.



I bought a few lodge pans for camping and noticed they seem pretty rough compared to the CI pans I was used to in the past. I thought about sanding out the inside of the pan to smoother finish and reseason. I really couldn't think of why it would be a bad idea to smooth out the CI?

2ManyHobbies
07-07-2015, 11:49 PM
I gave up on regular nonstick stuff and went all cast iron more than 15 years ago. 5 skillets, 2 griddles, one wok, and a pot. Haven't had any chip, split, crack, or explode yet. I wind up stripping and reseasoning 1-2 per year usually related to 3rd party misuse (usually partial burnouts when somebody attempts to "touch up" the seasoning and walks away leaving it on heat for an hour or so).

The flax seed oil coating works so well that I used it as a finish over black iron pipes and fittings (sand and wire brush first) when I made a rack to hang my cast iron on. The hooks are made from 4ga solid copper wire bent into S shapes on a hand bending jig and snugged to the rack so they don't come off when I lift cookware away.

I have repurposed a lavatory exhaust fan to vent the oven during burnout and seasoning and have also seasoned on the grill out back. The longest of the black pipe had to be done one end at a time in the grill, and it still turned out spectacularly. My main advice there is plan to use a whole roll of paper towels and consider 6-8 ply pot holders as 3 ply were a bit more towards dangerous than uncomfortable to manipulate hot pipe.

JRouche
07-08-2015, 12:20 AM
I bought a few lodge pans for camping and noticed they seem pretty rough compared to the CI pans I was used to in the past. I thought about sanding out the inside of the pan to smoother finish and reseason. I really couldn't think of why it would be a bad idea to smooth out the CI?

I am by no means an expert in anything. But will still give my opinion.. I have bought new CI pans that are about 35 years old now.. Some of the early ones were prolly from sears and used for camping.

They were rough also. I didnt smooth them out mainly because I didnt have a means, and didnt consider it, I was young and just wanted to camp and cook.. I still have them and they are as smooth as any new aluminum pan and when well heated and lubed are as non stick as and coated aluminum pans as new.

Fast forward a few years and I bought a few new CI pans and also considered smoothing them. It was not as rough as the late 1970's sears pans, but still a lil rough.

I didnt sand it though. My thinking is all the pock marks and texture give the carbon a strong hold and make the "coating" or seasoning basically permanent.

I can wash, and do sometimes, with hot soapy water. Just dry it off and its good to go. I dont even need to dry the pan really, it wont rust. And the coating stays on with all of the hottest heat I use for cooking, which can get very hot on my largest 20" pan, its a beast and lives inside my gas grill. JR

Willy
07-09-2015, 02:19 PM
Just an update to how that stinky pre-seasoned skillet of mine turned out.

I burned it clean on my Coleman stove outside and then smoothed out the inside bottom of the skillet as it was a little on the rough side as purchased. My old skillet that is lost somewhere on yard, I know too much stuff, had what looked like a very smooth, almost machined in appearance, interior. It took me about an hour but it came out very smooth,

After about 4 cycles of seasoning I finally had a chance to try it out for breakfast this morning with some bacon and eggs.
Happily the the horrible stink and taste are gone so I can only blame the pre-seasoning crap that they use in the PRC.
I can't believe that they will sell a whole lot of cookware with this stuff pre-installed for your culinary pleasure.
As good as some of my other cookware is for have non-stick qualities I can honestly say polishing the inside of the skillet was definitely not a waste of time, you almost have to to be careful that the eggs don't slide right out of the pan unintentionally.

Oh yeah, almost forgot how messy cast iron is to work with. I used a right angle die grinder with various Roloc mounted abrasives with a big fan going and I still get covered in the stuff.

vpt
07-09-2015, 09:15 PM
Thats good to hear! I will have to hurry up and polish mine up and season it before the next camping trip that is coming up fast!

JRouche
07-09-2015, 09:22 PM
Glad it turned out Willy.. You know she is good when fried eggs and not an issue... JR

Willy
07-10-2015, 01:47 AM
Just a follow up to my previous update.:)

You know after many decades of using and enjoying cast iron cookware I'm still learning new techniques and ideas about it's use. Take this thread for example lots of good suggestions and probably many hundreds of years of experience using cast iron cooking utensils. I learned some new techniques and am thankful for that.
Not that I have been doing things wrong all these years but sometimes one learns of doing things better or easier.
It's not a good day unless I learn something new

I also found the two videos linked to below helpful in laying down some no B.S. suggestions and advice in the care and feeding of cast iron as used in the kitchen. I'll be the first to admit there is a lot of chaff on You Tube that is almost impossible at times to separate from the wheat.
Either bad or incomplete advice to poor quality videos where either the sound quality is bad, lighting that is non-existent, or distracting video quality that leaves one wondering .... why am I watching this.

The man that produced the two videos below is actually an independent film maker and it shows, as both are very professionally done and quite comprehensive while not being boring.

Sanding and polishing cast iron cookware.

(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pVmCglTZWT8)
All about cast iron pt.2 How to season

(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MwFtcilsZls)

BigMike782
07-10-2015, 08:28 AM
I can't believe that they will sell a whole lot of cookware with this stuff pre-installed for your culinary pleasure.

They most likely do not care, they will sell enough to make a nice profit before it stops selling because of the crappy mfg process........and sadly what else matters?

Glad you got it figured out.

I have a well seasoned frying pan of my Grandmas that I use and a couple of pieces I bought at a swap meet that I will blast in the cabinet and then season.

2ManyHobbies
07-10-2015, 09:56 AM
Just a follow up to my previous update.:)

You know after many decades of using and enjoying cast iron cookware I'm still learning new techniques and ideas about it's use. Take this thread for example lots of good suggestions and probably many hundreds of years of experience using cast iron cooking utensils. I learned some new techniques and am thankful for that.
Not that I have been doing things wrong all these years but sometimes one learns of doing things better or easier.
It's not a good day unless I learn something new

I also found the two videos linked to below helpful in laying down some no B.S. suggestions and advice in the care and feeding of cast iron as used in the kitchen. I'll be the first to admit there is a lot of chaff on You Tube that is almost impossible at times to separate from the wheat.
Either bad or incomplete advice to poor quality videos where either the sound quality is bad, lighting that is non-existent, or distracting video quality that leaves one wondering .... why am I watching this.

The man that produced the two videos below is actually an independent film maker and it shows, as both are very professionally done and quite comprehensive while not being boring.

Sanding and polishing cast iron cookware.

(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pVmCglTZWT8)
All about cast iron pt.2 How to season

(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MwFtcilsZls)Too cool! His hanging rack for the cast iron is identical to mine. :)
Good tip on the sanding. I'll have to try that on a pan that is queued for refinishing.

topct
07-10-2015, 10:34 AM
I can picture a simple mechanism that would rotate the pan when a foot pedal is depressed. Being able to stand upright while working like that takes a lot of back pain out of a job like that.

dp
07-10-2015, 01:07 PM
Is nobody curious about the importers and retailers' role in this and why they accept products to sell that have these issues? I'm a big believer in following the trail backward to the nearest responsible party, and that is the guy that sells me a thing. Crap doesn't get here because it is badly made, it gets here because the supply line is not getting the proper negative feedback that would discourage them from putting such crap on their shelves.

BigMike782
07-10-2015, 03:52 PM
Simple(to me any way:))......price.

kendall
07-10-2015, 07:37 PM
Simple(to me any way:))......price.

Yep, price, added to the fact that most people are just consumers. People don't look at value, Had a guy at work could never understand why I would spend $200-$250 for boots when I could buy them at Kmart for $45 like he did. He never did grasp that he was actually spending more on his boots by replacing them every 3-4 months


Edit: The 'pre-seasoned' Is likely just a ploy to charge for anti-corrosion shipping spray by making it sound like a really good thing. Soon, they'll start charging for a 'deluxe cat play box included with every order'

vpt
07-10-2015, 08:20 PM
Just sanded my pan down. It wasn't a lodge as I thought, it is some cheaper "universal" pan. Its all smooth now anyhow and in the oven for a cleaning.

JRouche
07-10-2015, 09:13 PM
Is nobody curious about the importers and retailers' role in this and why they accept products to sell that have these issues? I'm a big believer in following the trail backward to the nearest responsible party, and that is the guy that sells me a thing. Crap doesn't get here because it is badly made, it gets here because the supply line is not getting the proper negative feedback that would discourage them from putting such crap on their shelves.


Hhaahaaa!! Shhhh, the importers are listening.. And the Ginormous Hole, AKA, loop hole is... They are NOT under the authority of the FDA. Even though it might be consumed when used as directed.. That could be an issue, dunno. JR

vpt
07-11-2015, 10:30 AM
Just sanded my pan down. It wasn't a lodge as I thought, it is some cheaper "universal" pan. Its all smooth now anyhow and in the oven for a cleaning.



Oh boy! She is smooth as a babies butt! Unfortunately the only thing I had around for seasoning is olive oil. The lard or flack seed oil will have to wait till next time. I was surprised how hard the cast acted and how tough it was to grind down.