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Pinresto
07-19-2015, 05:50 PM
I'm growing tired of beating my head against the wall so I'm asking for help. I have a SB 9" with a Cutler Hammer 5441H27A drum switch. My motor is a Hoover but I think it's made by GE. It's 115/230, 1/2 hp, 1725rpm. It has 7 wires coming from it. As far as I can tell it has two run winding, a start winding and one wire coming from the thermal overload. All the wire insulation was bad so I took the motor apart and replaced the wires. I've been looking online but can't find a diagram for this switch with a 7 wire motor. Can someone PLEASE tell me how to wire this up? I refurbished this lathe before moving to panama but I've yet to use it. Now that I'm here and ive set up my new shop I really want to make some chips. I'll try to post some pics directly. Thanks

Pinresto
07-19-2015, 06:16 PM
Here's a couple pics. I can get more if anyone needs them.

[URL=http://s1199.photobucket.com/user/Duketony75/media/IMG_20150719_165236.jpg.html]http://i1199.photobucket.com/albums/aa475/Duketony75/IMG_20150719_165236.jpg[/URL

Pinresto
07-19-2015, 06:17 PM
URL=http://s1199.photobucket.com/user/Duketony75/media/IMG_20150719_165808.jpg.html]http://i1199.photobucket.com/albums/aa475/Duketony75/IMG_20150719_165808.jpg[/URL]

kitno455
07-19-2015, 09:30 PM
The switch is fine- thats a typical CH 3 pole double throw switch with the factory installed jumpers to do their prefered brand of single phase switching.

The bigger question is, can you property identify all 4 leads of the run windings? They are not interchangeable. If you don't have them labeled, you best bet is to take the motor apart, and use a 9v battery to energize one of the run windings. Put a magnetic compass inside the motor, and mark a north pole. Label the the wire connected to the positive terminal T1 and the other T2. Then hook up the other run winding to the battery. Make sure the compass reads the same north pole at the same spot inside the motor. If not, swap the wires at the battery. Mark the positive wire T3, and the other T4.

Now, you need to figure out what the thermal limiter is doing. Use a volt meter, and figure out which of the other wires it is connected to.

Oh, and do you want to use 110 or 220?

allan

Pinresto
07-19-2015, 09:56 PM
I want 110v.
Just to clarify, take the winding out and set it vertical like a cup, then set a compass inside to find north? I can do this.
The thermal overload has three wires. A black wire comes from the winding to the THer overload. One wire then goes from the t.o. to the capacitor and the third wire exits the motor. I'm 95% sure that's correct but I'll check when I open the motor back up.
I really appreciate the help. I need it.

J Tiers
07-19-2015, 10:15 PM
I want 110v.
Just to clarify, take the winding out and set it vertical like a cup, then set a compass inside to find north? I can do this.
The thermal overload has three wires. A black wire comes from the winding to the THer overload. One wire then goes from the t.o. to the capacitor and the third wire exits the motor. I'm 95% sure that's correct but I'll check when I open the motor back up.
I really appreciate the help. I need it.

So the protector covers both the start winding and the run winding(s) already. The one that exits the motor would be the one to connect to for one power lead. You will have to "break in" and get both ends of the start winding available. You reverse those to reverse the motor (which must be shut off in between fwd and rev).

There is a paper on the inside of the switch cover, which should give you the right wiring for a number of different situations, likely including 120V. Take a look, and maybe post a clear closeup of the 120v diagram if it is not sufficiently clear to you.

once you have found the correct polarity of the motor windings, then you will parallel the two 120V windings, connecting to them as if they were just one. the switch diagram should show how you go from there.

kitno455
07-20-2015, 08:32 AM
Yes- you put the compass inside the stator, in the spot normally occupied by the rotor. Then you can figure out the polarity of the two run windings.

I think you need to spend a few minutes poking around at the two wires you have identified as start windings- it is possible that one of them does not do what you thing, or is not connected correctly internally. This is likely since you said the thermal limiter connects to the cap, which should be one side of the start winding.

allan

Pinresto
07-20-2015, 09:06 AM
You are correct. I was wrong about the thermal limiter. Here's a pic of the wiring.

http://i1199.photobucket.com/albums/aa475/Duketony75/Mobile%20Uploads/20150720_075600.jpg (http://s1199.photobucket.com/user/Duketony75/media/Mobile%20Uploads/20150720_075600.jpg.html)

Pinresto
07-20-2015, 09:08 AM
Here's a pic of the cover plate.

http://i1199.photobucket.com/albums/aa475/Duketony75/Mobile%20Uploads/20150301_173504.jpg (http://s1199.photobucket.com/user/Duketony75/media/Mobile%20Uploads/20150301_173504.jpg.html)

Pinresto
07-20-2015, 09:09 AM
I'm still lost so hopefully this is enough info for your help. Please tell me if you need anything else. I did figure out the N. And S. Poles.

J Tiers
07-20-2015, 10:27 AM
Did you look at the diagrams inside the switch? (assuming they are there, as they often are, and it isn't all techie jargon instead).

Pinresto
07-20-2015, 10:59 AM
No diagram inside the switch.

J Tiers
07-20-2015, 11:06 AM
OK, do you have a meter? Can you measure and determine the connections in each position? That LOOKS LIKE a standard switch, but I've been "caught" before by custom variations.

Trying to do ANY electrical work with no meter is definitely problematic, hopefully you have one. Often a measurement or two saves hours of trial and error. And some of the possible "errors" can cause long delays or other issues.

kitno455
07-20-2015, 06:42 PM
Ok- I think we have enough now- the two ends of the start winding circuit (including the cent. switch and the cap), are T5 and T8. You have already identified T1-T4. That leaves the three terminals of the limiter, P1 (input) and P2 and P3 (both outputs). In this diagram, I ignore P3, you could just cap it. This way, you don't actually need to identify P1 vs P2. Note, I have drawn the switch with the handle end downward. Also, you should only use the switch terminals with the brass washers. Let me know if you have problems.

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=702&d=1437431990

allan