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View Full Version : Needed- Lathes Anonymous, and my experience for folks starting out with lathes.



Pipcount
08-07-2015, 11:41 AM
I have been reading here for years, thought you fellows might get a kick out of my story, share a laugh, maybe help out someone starting out. The only other post/addition to the community I have done was my article "A "Bang Up" Method for Removing Stuck Screws" sent out in the hints from Machinists Workshop in July. I enjoy a bit of humor, my story is sort of funny.. share with your wife.

They say Alcoholics Anonymous's first step is to admit you have a problem, I need a Lathes Anonymous group in Houston. For the last ~ 7-10 years I have been on the lookout for a South Bend 9/Myford/etc in good workable condition. Basically a larger "bench" lathe. Houston industry is growing and relatively "new." This leads, I believe, to a short supply of old lathes in good condition. When a good older lathe appears on the market it goes VERY rapidly, and for prices frankly startling at times. So, in meantime, I have been buying small lathes. Lots of them.

I have owned, in order, the following lathes:
Micromark Sieg type mini- this was a real mistake. Purchased at a premium vs Grizzly or Harbor Freight hoping I would get a better quality lathe. Spent ~80 hours on the darn thing fixing bad work from factory and poor design.
Lathemaster 8x14- Quite good quality compared to the Sieg mini. This worked smoothly out of the box. Ultimately I ended up with a couple of projects that needed a bit more swing, bought G0602 10x22.
Between "big" lathes:
Cowells 90ME -~ 3.5 x 8 Sweet, but oh so small, found a deal while I had the 8x14 and just wanted to see a quality little lathe. My daughter and her friends turned beads on this little guy. Loved the auto traverse! Turned SHINY surfaces. An amazingly well built SMALL machine. A cantilevered mini!
Emco Compact 5 lathe/mill - A quite nice little lathe that can hold decent tolerances but with only SMALL cuts. I still have, need to sell, got to get a video together for it and post on Ebay. But I sure love have a small secondary machine in garage.
Grizzly G0602 (bought two years back, sold two-three weeks ago) - Good quality compared to Sieg Mini, good work envelope for me, but... not "nice"
Myford ML7R bought a couple months back. This is a Super 7 except for the cross/topslides and clutch. I picked up S7 Cross and topslides from Ebay... so essentially a Super 7 now. I still have and need to figure out what to sell- the Myford or the 9A.
South Bend 9A -picked up this last weekend at a neighborhood garage sale. Unbelievable... ten years of looking on Craigslist, missing the good ones, and it falls in my lap. This after I gave up on finding a quality SB9 in my area, bit the bullet and paid a premium price for a Myford. Now I have a dilemma indeed: What to keep.

I have a problem with lathes clearly. I just love the fine precision, good build. The Cowells and Emco "hooked" me on eventually getting a good quality lathe. The chinese items simply were not "cutting" it. Then this happens... now I have too many lathes again in the garage and have to make a very hard choice of keeping the Myford or the South Bend. Both are fine, in great shape. I think I will end up keeping the South Bend, due to quick change gearbox and power crossfeed. But it is not easy. The Myford is "like new" with likely only a few hours of use on making a single steam engine, then it sat in garage in NW until fellow passed on. I have the story directly from friends and family. The South Bend looks to be in "Very Good" shape, can see some of the scrapings on castings bearing surfaces still, no "ridges," and spindle turns smoothly. I have to recondition to be sure.

While this sounds silly, and my wife and family get a laugh out of it, I think my serial lathe adventures have one value- rather than wanting a lathe for ten years, I have had lathes, have made stuff, fixed stuff and had a TON of fun with them.

To a guy starting out my opinion: Don't wait for the perfect, cheap, old iron, you may grow old. Bite the bullet and get started, have fun. And... buying an older lathe that needs a lot of work can stall you getting real stuff done for a long time. Buy something that works well, now.

For inexpensive, relatively easy to move and set up, decent "starting out" lathe you would be hard pressed to beat the Lathemaster 8x14, and I have heard the harbor freight version is also pretty well done. The owner of Lathemaster, Robert Bertrand, has been very kind and pleasant to work with for accessories as well. Then the Grizzly G0602 is pretty good after set up, suggest you spring for the new variable speed version.. that is awfully nice to have and you wont save much with a DIY. The G0602 is pretty big, so plan a strong bench and get help moving even with an engine crane.

Be cautious of the 7x lathes. The "mini" I had required a LOT of work before it was even a decent experience. If you do go the mini route, get the longest bed you can find- the "Hi Torque" with 16" bed has been pretty well reviewed, good starter.

If you are willing to pay too darn much for the size, the Emco and Cowell's turn very nicely, just SMALL. Hard to do anything but miniature work on these. Clocks, micro models, pens on the compact 5.

I wish you all the luck in the world, and that you enjoy this great hobby. If you know of any lathe "self help groups" in Houston let me know. ;)

What would you keep, the Myford or the Southbend...

Daveb
08-07-2015, 11:53 AM
Why not keep both? It's better than money in the bank.
You are suffering from a mild form of OIS, if you had it bad you would just build a bigger shop.
It's probably cheaper than golf and you seem to be enjoying it, just carry on doing that.
Dave

flylo
08-07-2015, 01:01 PM
Welcome to the addiction & forum. My advise if you keep them all you'll never miss the one you sold. Not quite that bad but a lathe of each size from my Unimat to Pacemaker.

HWooldridge
08-07-2015, 01:28 PM
Lathes are like guns - you sell one then you kick yourself for years afterwards. Keep all of 'em...leaves more for the estate sale, whenever that finally comes round.

ncjeeper
08-07-2015, 01:43 PM
I would get a bigger shop. :)

Pipcount
08-07-2015, 02:04 PM
Glory be, I knew I was not alone! I've been thinking of adding space on to the back of the garage. :)

Dave C
08-07-2015, 02:18 PM
There you go!:)

mickeyf
08-07-2015, 02:44 PM
Yes, I'm about to move partly so that I can have a bigger shop. Unfortunately, I'll have to build it, which means my tools will be in storage for months and I'll have to move them twice. I trust it will be worth it in the end.

If you do have to sell, what I do when faced with a binary decision and uncertainty is to flip a coin. Then usually I say to myself, "Drat! that wasn't how I wanted it to land!", and I'm clearer on what I really wanted...

Pipcount
01-03-2016, 06:43 PM
Ok, the saga continues... In last few months decided to look at some smaller lathes. Picked up a set of three lathes from the family of a clockmaker/watch repair man. His son sold, was about 65 himself. Apparently the father was one of the last of the individual craftsmen, made several hundred clocks/year.
1. Complete Sherline lathe and milling attachment. Figure to keep this as an auxiliary spindle for use with my bigger lathes
2. Boley Watchmakers lathe, tons of ww collets, and a Jahn and Wolf Crossslide... very nice. Put a old B&S Best Test on it, had less than 0.0001 runout as the dial barely trembled as I spun the spindle. I honestly have never seen something like this, my first lathes were Chinese, had several thou of runout on inside of spindle cone. Amazing.. But, have to sell, part of "bundle" with the Sherline I wanted. Putting on Ebay. The cross slide is amazingly well made, I am glad I bought bundle just to see this stuff.
3. Peerless watchmaker lathe. Have not really tested, figure this goes on Ebay cheap. Again, part of the bundle with the Sherline.
4. Emco Unimat 3. No milling parts, not part of the estate, just ran across it an wanted to see it. Really nicely built small lathe. Not sure if going to keep or not... need space, but this seems like a useful little lathe. I hate to give up.

flylo
01-03-2016, 07:18 PM
Come on over we have meetings weekly. Weicome to the madness:p

Magicniner
01-03-2016, 07:18 PM
I'd keep the Myford, but I've got pretty much a full set of compatible tooling and a 30mm through capacity headstock ;-)

David Powell
01-03-2016, 07:22 PM
Seven metal working lathes and a wood lathe for my use. The ones I like least will be sold, Quality machines lead to happy, productive hobbyists. Poor machines only lead to frustration and upset. I think I would rather a Southbend than a Myford, providing I had a mill to keep it company, If I had to have just one machine I would keep a Myford simply because of the range of accessories available. Hope this helps David Powell.

Mcgyver
01-03-2016, 07:47 PM
haha, true confessions...i've hauled a huge amount of classic old lathes home. I know guys with more, but I'm in an urban setting with no barn to fill so have live the old iron life to the fullest....given the sq footage available. Managed to stay married and somehow raise 4 kids....who are now mostly gone, creating new space opportunities ! :D


11" standard Modern. gone
long bed 11" Standard Modern - gone
Stark instrument lathe - gone
unimat DB200 - gone
Myford super - 7 gone
Maximat 7 - will sell
Maximat 10 - will sell
Monarch 10ee - keeper
Dean Smith and Grace 13x42 - keeper
Unimat 3 - keep
second Unimat 3 - will go
Goodel Pratt - gone
Dunlap POS gone
Rivett watchmakers lathe with tons of stuff - keep
Boley watchmakers lathe with collets- probably to go
Boley Leinen (different co. than Boley) wathcmakers lathe, boxed, complete setup, probably keep
Rivett 608 - might go/might keep
a few other watchmakers that came with bundle, not complete or not well accessorized
Holbrook B8 - Keeper
Schaublin 70 loaded - keeper
second Schaublin 70. - undecided, probably needs to go for space considerations

thats 14, 7 would be I think rightsized and have all the bases covered! of the keepers, all but the Holbrook and 10ee are in great shape. Those two are scheduled for the full monty reconditioning

I think that's it and I think i'm done. I got the maximat 10 as a project to scrape as an example of doing box ways. Pretty much everything else was bought with the intent of building out the shop....but then something nicer or better or in between would come along.

There is no doubt the acquisitions have far out stretch the needs; I confess to me the really well made tools are like sculpture; I just like 'em. I tell myself i don't have a problem because 1) I use them, 2) I can let them go and 3) having duplicates does nothing for me

Abaker
01-03-2016, 10:08 PM
My pattern is to trade up, but just keep the old ones. I'm trying to sell some, just not too hard.

I have on hand:
2 Sheldon 10" - one with broken compound and a missing taper slide; One in good shape for sale.
1 Sheldon 11" - Looks almost unused for a 1938 machine Going for sale soon
Rockford Econony lathe 12X24 gear head - older model with bronze spindle bearings - for sale
Tsugami - a Japanese knock off of the Hardinge HCT chucker turret lathe. Not really sure if that is a keeper or not.
Monach 16X78 CY - Keeper for sure. Unless I stumble on a pristine model 60 or something like that
Monarch 10EE round dial in parts - project machine. very dirty and with a dead drive but not too worn. That's a keeper

and my newest - just got it off the trailer 2 hours ago -
Hendy 9X20 T&G lathe - Older version with an AC motor and variable speed. Probably a keeper too unless it's just too redundant with the 10EE. For now the 10EE is all apart and this is running.

Doozer
01-03-2016, 10:30 PM
...
I have a problem with lathes clearly. I just love the fine precision, good build. The Cowells and Emco "hooked" me on eventually getting a good quality lathe. The chinese items simply were not "cutting" it. ...

Buy a Hardinge or a Monarch 10EE and you will about crap your pants.
I have 3 Hardinge lathes and a Hendey T&G lathe myself.
(Ok, I have about 6 lathes total)

--Doozer

boslab
01-03-2016, 10:51 PM
If you don't know what to do, don't do anything, somewhat contrary to the no decision camp but I've found that more often than not no decision was the right one, derived from some interesting industrial experiences when you don't know which way to run then perhaps standing still is the correct thing to do.
Anyway you seem to be having fun, good job you didn't apply the same mantra to milling machines or your shop would be huge!
Mark

flylo
01-04-2016, 12:31 AM
I would get a bigger shop. :)

Yea Right, a 54'x84' with a path down the center after buying racking & a16'x60' for overflow with no path & still a few tarped on the hanger skirt & not even 1/2 of the haul I just bought. We all upgrade as we go but next I'm going to go look at a CNC. I was out in the shop today & hadn't realized one Warner Swassey #3 & one Logan are both set up with double tool post front & back, collet closers & turrets. The other Warner Swassey & Logan have chucks & tailstocks. 2 pair 1 large & 1 small both pair set up just alike. I thought about a maker shop for guys with no room.

Puckdropper
01-04-2016, 05:56 AM
Those things are kinda like potato chips, aren't they? Can't stop at just one. Not too long after I bought a new Taig, I'm buying the bits to turn wood on it, then I go out and buy a Wood lathe. I use them both now. I used to worry about the slippery slope that lathes and turning are, but you know what? It's a ton of fun sliding down!

I'm still looking for a "full size" lathe, with a bed around 30"-40" or so, but for what I do the Taig is handling it nicely. If they'd add just another 6" to that bed... (Really 6" is all I need. (Really, just 6" would be enough.) C'mon, it's just 6".) [Once I get it, I'll probably want another 6"!]

Seastar
01-04-2016, 11:41 AM
You guys make me jealous.
I only have 3 lathes, 2 Logans and an atlas.
I never have sold anything that followed me home and don't intend to.
I guess I will intensify my search for that perfect machine tool.
Bill

greystone
01-04-2016, 12:09 PM
Just try upgrading them to "good cnc"...
15.000 work hours (12 years full time) and 100k€ in current value stuff later...
The minilathe has not been used for years, I will do a sample tiny-cnc on it just for ****s and giggles some day.

Otoh, my current version 3 of the cnc lathe has 90 Nm torque, with a servo indexed spindle, ie c axis.

Original was 12x24 heavy, chicom, from chester.
Very pleased with it, it just needed brushless servo drives for spindle, z,x (and b) and ballscrews, and a high speed hardware controller (4 Mhz).

Baz
01-04-2016, 04:54 PM
Back to the original question. It depends on the size of things you want to machine. The SB is much more solid than a Myford and would do everything a Myford would do and more, including right down to clock making size (but not watchmaking) but might not be in such good condition. It sounds like the Myford is in top condition though, so I would seek to keep it for the precision work and complement it with a 12x for bigger stuff which seems to be roughly where you are going.

flylo
01-04-2016, 05:25 PM
You guys make me jealous.
I only have 3 lathes, 2 Logans and an atlas.
I never have sold anything that followed me home and don't intend to.
I guess I will intensify my search for that perfect machine tool.
Bill

The good part is they don't eat, normally don't loose their value & much cheaper to rid of than wives & easier to get along with too:rolleyes:

farrviewsouth
01-06-2016, 07:19 PM
Sell something .........odd idea


I did that once almost 50 years ago. Still regret it

darryl
01-06-2016, 08:45 PM
"if you can't decide, do nothing" has saved me lots of dollars over the years. I don't get rid of any machine, I just accumulate- but slowly. I don't often see a machine that I want, so it's easier for me in that regard. Still have my Unimat, but I've re-built it to have a more substantial head stock, motor, and bed. Got rid of the bars and now it has a cast iron dovetailed bed. Still need to work on it more- but I lean more towards making the machine better rather than getting a better machine. I have a few machine projects in the works, but soon I'll have to make getting a bigger shop one of my priorities.

I have been thinking lately that there must be some machinists around that are getting too old to want to do it anymore, or who have passed and left their wives the task of clearing out the life-long collection of tools and machines. I would not mind acquiring some other machines at prices a hobbyist can afford- but no room at present.

Pipcount
01-16-2016, 11:40 AM
Thanks fellows! Clearly I am not alone in this obsession.

I am now leaning to get rid of the Myford, keep the South Bend. I picked up a South Bend lathe DTS-100K 10K 9” flat top cross slide with 4 T slots, like MLA cross slide but beefier/taller. So, now I have milling table capability on South Bend 9A. To me, that is the big difference between the two lathes, otherwise similar capabilities. Once you have the table, you can use just about any similar accessory, or make one yourself.

The Myford came with just about EVERY accessory that they had, except for dividing head... I had to buy another old Kennedy cabinet to hold all the accessories- and filled it up. They will all fit a 9A, although I imagine some have odd bolt hole spacings to deal with.

Thanks for all the interesting responses and support. I told my family about this posting over Christmas, how all the responses were supportive, they no longer think I am totally crazy... just mildly! :) I said "I am in good company"

tlfamm
01-16-2016, 12:19 PM
...
Still have my Unimat, but I've re-built it to have a more substantial head stock, motor, and bed. Got rid of the bars and now it has a cast iron dovetailed bed. Still need to work on it more- but I lean more towards making the machine better rather than getting a better machine.
...


Pix would be interesting.

Mcgyver
01-16-2016, 12:46 PM
I am now leaning to get rid of the Myford, keep the South Bend.

If about the same size, I would have thought the Myford would be considered a much better lathe, but confess i haven't had a SB. Pedigree aside, what what drive it for me was firstly wear and secondly how complete was the tooling/accessories.


Still have my Unimat, but I've re-built it to have a more substantial head stock, motor, and bed. Got rid of the bars and now it has a cast iron dovetailed bed.

anything still on it from Austria? a what point should you start to call it a "darryl" instead?

Pipcount
04-21-2016, 04:23 PM
Well, finally got around to listing the EMCO Compact 5 lathe on Ebay. Priced really high, going to drop it a few hundred a week until it sells. If I can make a bit on this, maybe can recoup what is almost certainly going to be a loss on the Myford..

Having fun on this, thanks for the comments.

greystone
04-21-2016, 05:51 PM
Cool thread.
I like it - it resonates.

The Myfords are very valuable.

My experience, opinion, is that at 10x the chicom stuff starts to be good.
There are heavy and light versions.
Look at length/mass. Difference is 2-5x, relative.
Always buy the heavy.

Any lathe can be made to be uber accurate (yes it can).
Its not commercially viable, and will cost surprising amounts in $$ and hours.
Anyone can learn, from zero.

oddball racing
04-21-2016, 06:59 PM
In order:
1952 13" x40 Southbend Toolroom Lathe , free! Got it needing a cross feed screw. Came with all the goodies too.
1920's Dalton 7 a real sweetheart. Nice hvy. duty small lathe. Cost 5 bucks for fuel to retrieve it from a marina garage.

Craftsman 109 got it off craigslist fully tooled for $75. Problem is, I now can say that was a complete waste of money!

1943 war labeled Southbend 9 x 30 I actually paid $550 for this one. Twas an EBay find.

1975 Rockwell 12"? Wow... I don't even remember, as its stuffed in the corner. Dragged that one out of a collapsed building along with a plasma cutter and an anvil and blacksmiths vise.

1950 Strange one year only Southbend 10"x36 on a factory cabinet fully tooled. Not a Heavy Ten nor is it a 10K.

The only one I would sell right now is the 109. For obvious reasons of which we won't go to.

So, I think I've got it too,

The Artful Bodger
04-21-2016, 07:50 PM
My number one lathe is a generic Chinese 12x36, I did not have a clue when I bought it and no doubt there is a great deal I still dont know 8 years later.

Also in my workshop, a c1908 3 1/2" Drummond flat bed lathe. It is amazing that practically everything that was delivered with that lathe was still with it more than a century later when I got it. Very nice to do small jobs on and looks a treat after my mainly cosmetic restoration.
http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5015/5579100166_4624004868.jpg
Drummond of course was the mother of all Myfords!

There is a Granville lathe on another bench which came to me as bit of a basket case but is now very usable and is in some ways more convenient than the Drummond.
https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5443/8756036493_bd82945b44_z.jpg

My little Flexispeed is shown here..
https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1703/25623256775_b76100b9e8_z.jpg
..being used to recut the countersink on 200+ screws for our Mig17 restoration at the local aviation museum. Flexispeed lathes I believe developed to become Cowells.

I also have two original brass bed Sherline lathes, these are the original Australian machines not the much more numerous American clones.

A solitary Adept lathe sits on a high shelf, I dont think I have ever done more than sharpen a couple of pencils with it but I would not be surprised to learn that someone wearing a fair isle sleeveless pullover and smoking a pipe managed to build a live steam model of the Flying Scotsman on a machine like this, on the kitchen table of course after the youngsters had gone up to bed.
http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5176/5511632818_2a20e1e634.jpg

Sackett
04-26-2016, 08:02 PM
I'm new here, n new to machining,,, but think I may also haveearly stages of the affliction.Took me nearly a year to find my first hit, Craftsman 618,,,took lieraly all the $$$ I had to buy it,, n go the 400 miles one way to get.It's currently getting a new bench, the nice grey metal one it came on os just the right height to cripple me if I stand at it more than a few min. The Atlas 7b will get the metal stand.
I still search craigslist daily for a bigger / better one, but nothing has come up close to WV....I thinkits reallly unfair that some of you guys have so many,, but damn , I'm glad for you. My day will come,lol

hephaestus
04-26-2016, 09:08 PM
Lathes are like guns - you sell one then you kick yourself for years afterwards. Keep all of 'em...leaves more for the estate sale, whenever that finally comes round.

I'm leaving everything to the NRA, I sure as hell don't
want the gubberment to get it.

jhe.1973
04-27-2016, 02:04 AM
I'm new here, n new to machining,,, but think I may also haveearly stages of the affliction.Took me nearly a year to find my first hit, Craftsman 618,,,took lieraly all the $$$ I had to buy it,, n go the 400 miles one way to get.It's currently getting a new bench, the nice grey metal one it came on os just the right height to cripple me if I stand at it more than a few min. The Atlas 7b will get the metal stand.
I still search craigslist daily for a bigger / better one, but nothing has come up close to WV....I thinkits reallly unfair that some of you guys have so many,, but damn , I'm glad for you. My day will come,lol

Hello Sackett,

Welcome to the asylum............I mean forum.............yeah,that's it forum.

I get so confused sometimes! :D

Your day will come as long as you keep a lookout and are willing to travel a little. I moved to AZ from WV and both were/are rural areas, therefore the need to make buying trips.

Artful: You have a few really cool looking machines there! The small ones especially look quite sturdy.

My two cents about having several similar machines:

I've lost count of the number of times I have been setup in one machine (be it lathe or mill) and I find a need to make a quick gauge (or whatever) to finish something. That to me is worth having the extra machine standing by.

I have even had to use an idle mill as a lathe so that I could turn something to use for finishing the first part I was working on in the lathe.

This is why I would never own a do-everything-machine such as a combo mill/lathe or Shopsmith style woodworking machine. It would be too frustrating for me to tear down a setup just to make something and have to re-setup all over again.

I have four running lathes now w/another to get up and running this year (I hope). They range from a 16 in. SB to a well tooled Levin instrument lathe. I got the Levin 'cuz it was a great deal, but I am surprised at how often I use it because it has a 3C spindle bore and will take up to 1/2 inch shaft.

Mcgyver
04-27-2016, 08:11 AM
duplicate

Mcgyver
04-27-2016, 08:13 AM
I've lost count of the number of times I have been setup in one machine (be it lathe or mill) and I find a need to make a quick gauge (or whatever) to finish something. That to me is worth having the extra machine standing by.


best justification yet....it will be memorized. I find the I also get attracted to different benefits of different tooling packages.....one has a turret, one has a complete set of collets....I guess I need both :)

wait....IT HAPPENED AGAIN.......HELP!!!

This is a Pultra, made by Smart Brown. Came with a very complete tooling package, 50 collets, 3 jaw, 4 jaw, faceplate, drill chuck.....a very nice little lathe that will run up 6000 rpm. I knowf one or two guys who have one....anyone else here?

http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b201/michael0100/Pultra%2017%2070/DSC_1619-large_zpsxldksy4i.jpg (http://s20.photobucket.com/user/michael0100/media/Pultra%2017%2070/DSC_1619-large_zpsxldksy4i.jpg.html)

flylo
04-27-2016, 09:18 AM
I'm new here, n new to machining,,, but think I may also haveearly stages of the affliction.Took me nearly a year to find my first hit, Craftsman 618,,,took lieraly all the $$$ I had to buy it,, n go the 400 miles one way to get.It's currently getting a new bench, the nice grey metal one it came on os just the right height to cripple me if I stand at it more than a few min. The Atlas 7b will get the metal stand.
I still search craigslist daily for a bigger / better one, but nothing has come up close to WV....I thinkits reallly unfair that some of you guys have so many,, but damn , I'm glad for you. My day will come,lol

Welcome! I've had many lathes & still have my favorite 618 Atlas & a 1236 Commercial Craftsman. You'll have more than one soon as they multiply more than rabbits do. Enjoy the forums & ask anything you need as there is a wealth of smart people on here, me excluded.

sawlog
04-27-2016, 10:06 AM
The good part is they don't eat, normally don't loose their value & much cheaper to rid of than wives & easier to get along with too:rolleyes:

i agree

Rex
04-30-2016, 12:16 AM
Gosh, I thought I was alone out here!

Logan 9x17
Enco 1024
Atlas 10" (several)
Atlas 618 - 5? And picking up another Sunday
AA 109s - 3, still have 2 on the library shelf behind me
Grizzly 12x37
Emco C5CNC
Enco 12x24
South Bends 9A and 9C
Logan Powermatic 12"
Wade 8x20
Sioux Falls 10"

.... probably forgetting a few

And right now I have a
9x28 Logan which I use the most
Logan Powermatic 11x34
Techno 9x20 CNC project
Emco Compact 5 CNC project
....and the 618 coming this weekend

Supposed to go see a guy next week that has "a lot" of South Bends and 618s, package deal".

I'm in trouble.

Pipcount
01-28-2017, 10:25 PM
Been a while since my last post. The two small Emcos are off to new homes. Not making much, but covering costs and having fun still.

Artful's stable of lathes is awe inspiring, they are BEAUTIFUL. What care you lavish on your machines.

Mcgyver- love the pultra. Now there is another brand I have to find. :)

Regarding Flylo's comment "The good part is they don't eat, normally don't loose their value & much cheaper to rid of than wives & easier to get along with too"- my wife is quite sensible and patient regarding my addiction. Just today I said "Honey, there is a lathe on sale downtown, I am thinking of picking it up, would you mind?" and she just said "Go get it." Man, am I lucky! I have never had a big wood lathe, that old shopsmith is looking kind of neat. :)

Hope you all are having fun!

J Tiers
01-28-2017, 11:21 PM
Late to the fest here....

So far I have had 4 lathes, 2 shapers, two die filers, 3 drillpresses, 2 mills, and most of one T&C grinder, plus small stuff.

One lathe (POS Craftsman) is gone. The others are keepers (Rivet 608, Boley watch lathe (no crosslide yet), Logan 200) I'm open on the keeper part, because the Logan might be too small once I get the 608 going (got it in trashed condition), I'd prefer a 12 or 14" unit, and the Logan and Rivett are somewhat duplicative size-wise.

The shapers are still around, dunno if just one, or both are going. I need room for the big steel Rivett cabinet stand.

One die filer is gone. The other, with a big supply of files, is "on the bubble", I used it a lot for a while, and recently it has not been what I needed.

Still have the drillpresses. One got banished to the other shop out in the shed, and might leave (it's a POS). One is a small antique benchtop unit (keeper) that is in-scale with the Boley, the last is an 18" MT3 Atlas-Clausing that is a keeper unless I find a better one.

The mills (Lewis and Benchmaster) are keepers unless I find a nicer vertical mill.

The T&C would leave as soon as I find a better one. And I need a surface grinder, but have no room. Another reason for a shaper to leave.

As for wives, about half of these my wife pointed out to me........

ACHiPo
01-29-2017, 10:59 AM
As somebody that's looking to get his first lathe and mill--now I know where all the good iron is! Jeez guys, give somebody else a chance ;)

Pipcount
09-19-2017, 11:59 PM
Some of you fellows make me feel like I don't have a problem! I need help, not encouragement. :) McGyver I envy, Artful Bodger- beautiful lathes, great reconditioning work. Sackett- seek help early! Rex: wow... But...

Darn it, happened again (and again)... in last few months picked up a poor condition unimat for kicks and a pretty nice Emco v10p, and some lathe from East Germany that is pretty nice but only good for light cuts and small stuff- built with a strange half cylinder bed, so great alignment, but a small lever arm to resist torque when cutting. The darn east german lathe was part of another "package deal"- to think I ended up with a drill press, arbor press and lathe when I just wanted an arbor press. I am starting to really struggle with room in garage, going to have to make a hard choice regarding either 9A, ML7R, or this new V10P. Oh, and of course, reassemble and pass on the East German lathe.

The V10P is quite an interesting lathe "small" lathe-power feed via a dedicated shaft rather than using the lead screw is new to me. A very sturdy bed, and a bit longer than either the 9A or Myford. In working condition, great headstock bearings (no discernable wobble - under .0002, maybe 0.0001 which is best I can measure with any confidence,) gears all clean and look great. The bed and cross slide/milling table show some dings- no discernible wear to speak of, simply looks like the guys who owned in past dropped light items on bed. Section near where milling head would throw chips has some marks that look like big chips hit the bed and scored it up a bit- perhaps chips were pulled under carriage and scored surface? I guess when I take carriage off and check how the underside looks if I find pits or grooves that will be what happened, otherwise I have to noodle on it a bit- looks like a HEAVY wire wheel with nearly no bristles banged on the bed in a 4" section.

The little lathes are keepers, can use so many ways, excepting . These bigger ones sure take up space. The Myford ML7R is PRISTINE and came with just about every accessory you could name except dividing head, so hard to let it go. The 9A and V10P both need my time, the Emco more, and I am finding I may have too many hobbies. I keep fixing up and passing on the little ones, the larger ones are sitting.

Made a real nice kaleidoscope recently, was a gift at a celebrity/Hollywood wedding. Without too much detail I cast fine silver for caps, used carbon fiber for tube, oil filled object chamber, nicely figured bocote stand. $300 was my material cost for darn thing if you can believe it. Fellow at a local club had seen some of my other hobby work and asked if I could make something unusual and artsy for a wedding gift, from his description of the couple it seemed viable- he says the couple were pretty pleased with the end result. Pun warning:
Turns out silver doesn't turn well- I used HSS cutter with easily 55 degree angle to cutting surfaces, and lots of clearance, so the tool was a small wedge up to the silver... and it was just plain gummy. Next attempt I am going to spin the caps, my first attempt at spinning- of course I have to make the tools first, joy!

Made some tools to make building my pens easier. Working on customizing an old parker to fit modern ball point refills, some unusual inlays, etc.

Between reading darn near every home shop machinist book I can find and having a lathe and the willingness to try stuff, you can do an amazing number of things. My day job is at a large computer manufacturer, working in the High Performance Computing segment, mainly artificial intelligence hardware nowadays- the folks I work with are so smart it is amazing. I am not sure how I got hired. Still, when I bring in a little gizmo I made for show and tell, or fix something for folks, they are flabbergasted. Most of the engineers and other folks simply no longer build anything or fix anything. Many of them clearly desire to build physical items, but simply never get started, even when I offer to help them make something of their own. Some don't seem happy to be working in our field, or perhaps I should say they don't seem deeply interested in the technology, it is just a job. Which leads to discussion of the joy of machining...

I have NEVER met a machinist who did not like his job. It is the most awesome mix of creativity and puzzle solving. Some of the pieces I have seen guys build are so wonderful it boggles my mind. They are beautiful in and of themselves. All my work has been so simple. Some is beautiful, but simple.

Thinking of a set of projects: a couple simple steam engines (Rudy K designs) and maybe a rotary engine.

I have an interesting idea for a simple QC tool set for HSS using some ideas similar to the ones that float around on forums for "tangential" cutters, crossed with some design ideas from G. Thomas, and an idea from one of the projects book series- get near zero tool unsupported tool overhang, good visibility to work, ability to work up close to tailstock, easier sharpening, positive alignment.. but easy to build. I may be missing something.

Want a laugh? See my short article last year: www.machinistsworkshop.net/a-bang-up-method-for-removing-stuck-screws/

metalmagpie
09-20-2017, 02:40 AM
One day at a time, bro.

I have found 14x40" to be a good size for a home shop. The footprint is only a little bigger than my last SB9 on its stand, but my 14x40 is oh so much more capable.

metalmagpie

Rex
09-20-2017, 07:44 AM
And right now I have a
9x28 Logan which I use the most
Logan Powermatic 11x34
Techno 9x20 CNC project
Emco Compact 5 CNC project
.

Since added

South Bend 10K
South Bend 9" Toolroom

TMo
09-20-2017, 02:16 PM
I started out with a 6" craftsman lathe that had serious issues. Then I picked up one of the 7x Seig's and I spent a fair bit of time making it work better than it started. I made some cool stuff with that little lathe. It did always feel too small for a lot of stuff, and it was, but I did what I could. I still have it on a bench in the garage. I've been thinking about adding the LMC 16" bed extension to make it a little more useful.

Then I ended up with a 13" Leblonde. I barely got it running in the short time I had it, and never even made a chip with it before having to move across the state, I gave it to a friend who's still using it today.

Then I was in a rental without a garage for a while and didn't even have room for the little Seig, but after getting settled in after buying a house and having a baby, I ended up buying a basket case Reed Prentice 16" to save it from the scrapyard. It hasn't seen power, and until I either learn to cut gears or find a few replacement gears for the gearbox on it, It's just gonna sit... sadly.

Then a few months ago I found a Southbend 13" toolroom lathe with a ton of accessories that's ready to go. I still haven't picked it up yet, I have to make room in the garage... (That reed prentice is massive and takes up a lot of space for what is essentially a boat anchor at the moment)

And now I'm thinking really hard about a good deal I've found on a 15" Indian made lathe... I have no idea where I would put it...

Wait, I'll build a workshop... that's the answer to all of my problems... then I can get all my other tools out of storage too!

What were we talking about?

WilsonT
09-21-2017, 09:30 PM
It's nice to know that I am in good company. My friends give me grief because I have multiples of welders, lathes, saws, drill presses. I only have 3 lathes and I still look at them. (Still look at pretty women too, even though I am sure that I don't want another one.) My latest acquisition is a (16x42?) Monarch. Still cleaning it up and moving it into place. I still have yet to get it leveled and powered up. It is so old that Monarch does not have the records as to when it was made. I am still looking for a good horizontal mill. I bought a surface grinder a couple of years ago that I am still rebuilding. The hydraulics were toast when I got it. I guess that it is good that when I built my shop, I have plenty of space.

olcop
09-22-2017, 11:11 AM
Glory be, I knew I was not alone! I've been thinking of adding space on to the back of the garage. :)

And, when you get it finished---it will be too small.
olcop

Dan_the_Chemist
09-22-2017, 02:42 PM
Buy a Hardinge or a Monarch 10EE and you will about crap your pants.
I have 3 Hardinge lathes and a Hendey T&G lathe myself.
(Ok, I have about 6 lathes total)

--Doozer

Seems like there is a nice little Hardinge just down the road from Houston

http://www.ebay.com/itm/hardinge-turret-lathe-5c-collet-chucker-with-tooling-/182593273644?hash=item2a83683f2c:g:EggAAOSw-K9ZKDkR

HWooldridge
09-22-2017, 03:20 PM
Seems like there is a nice little Hardinge just down the road from Houston

http://www.ebay.com/itm/hardinge-turret-lathe-5c-collet-chucker-with-tooling-/182593273644?hash=item2a83683f2c:g:EggAAOSw-K9ZKDkR

That's one of those little manual turrets that Hardinge made (may still for all I know). Great for small production runs but generally no tailstock.

Pipcount
03-15-2018, 09:45 AM
FUN.. little sherline up this weekend in Houston, hope to pick up another- use headstock for auxiliary spindle is my rationale- note the use of word "rationale" has at root idea that this is "reasonable"... almost certainly not the case. :)

flylo
03-15-2018, 11:28 AM
I think I down to about a dozen from an Unimat to a Pacemaker, 3 Logans, 2 Atlas, 2 Hardinge, & a few others but only 6 mills so I'm slowly downsizing. The older I get the less I tolerate some peoples BS like offering 1/4 of the price without even seeing it.

Mcgyver
03-15-2018, 02:54 PM
since added

Hauser M1 jig borer
Aciera F1 mill
another Schaublin 70 - this one with full collet set, miling spindle/attachment, dividing head, microscope....yippy
Micro Vu Optical Comparator

thats it. I'd like a gear hobber and maybe a more substantial clyndrical grinder, oh, and Felder wood working machines. Dang, I'm going got have to move.....need more space.

Alistair Hosie
03-15-2018, 04:47 PM
Lathes are like guns - you sell one then you kick yourself for years afterwards. Keep all of 'em


Wow who does that sound like.. ? Answer.
tubal cain of course. alistair

metalmagpie
03-15-2018, 09:31 PM
USE IT OR LOSE IT

metalmagpie

Tundra Twin Track
03-16-2018, 01:25 AM
Holy $hit some of you guys have a lot of lathes,I only have 1 a 18x60 Mazak clone made in China in 1988.We had a 12x36 Frejoth Taiwanese machine for 25 years on the farm,good machine.The China built one I have now has been very good,got skidded from active duty in Tool&Die Shop to make more room for CNC equipment.It came with Newall DRO and Rapidue tool post with lots of holders,the larger size and 2 speed tail stock has been a great up grade.

jhe.1973
03-19-2018, 12:33 AM
since added

Hauser M1 jig borer
Aciera F1 mill
another Schaublin 70 - this one with full collet set, miling spindle/attachment, dividing head, microscope....yippy
Micro Vu Optical Comparator

thats it. I'd like a gear hobber and maybe a more substantial clyndrical grinder, oh, and Felder wood working machines. Dang, I'm going got have to move.....need more space.

Hi Mcgyver,

Congrats on finding a Hauser M1. What type of work do you do that you would need one. I never saw one for sale that didn't require my mortgaging the house, shop and my right arm and leg! :D

Looking at your other finds, it sounds like you are into some fairly small precision stuff.