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goose
08-28-2015, 09:40 PM
Drill press vise, a lot to choose from. Plain screw vise, cam operated, self-centering, Safe-T vise (which looks like a bar clamp), and many others.

For general purpose drilling of assorted materials, (sheet, bar stock, wood, plastic), what do you use, what do you recommend?

Drill presses I'm using are 14" and 17" with production table.
Thanks,

J Tiers
08-28-2015, 10:55 PM
Recommend? I can tell you what I use, but your needs/likes and mine are probably different.

I use a screw type vise, generally mounted on an X-Y table. Without the XY table, the vise is rather limiting if clamped down.

When I use someone else's drill press, I often put a c-clamp on the table as a "post" to brace the work or vise against, emulating a safety vise.

justanengineer
08-29-2015, 12:01 AM
JMO but you cant go wrong with a float lock vise.

Paul Alciatore
08-29-2015, 12:19 AM
All the drill press vises that I have are just straight screw types. I have two drill presses plus my Unimat can be set up as a small one so I guess that makes three. I have a $20 import vise that I use with my bench top DP. I have a Craftsman that I use with my floor stand DP. I have an import angle vise that I use all over. The Unimat has it's own small (50mm) vise.

In my last job I used three Palmgren drill press vises on the milling machine to hold rack panels and other 15" to 19" wide components for milling.

But I am not doing production work. Most of my stuff is single quantity or just a few. So I feel little need for a cam operated one.

flylo
08-29-2015, 01:10 AM
I use these in 6" & 8" as they're quick & lock tight, DAYTON 4YG29 Vise, Quick Release

steve herman
08-29-2015, 02:49 AM
I have a Wilton 6" Cam action drill press vise I use exclusively on my drill press. very fast and plenty of holding power. gave away my screw type vise.

Steve

Added this plate for easy clamping.

http://i784.photobucket.com/albums/yy126/steveherman/011_3.jpg[[URL=http://s784.photobucket.com/user/steveherman/media/014_2.jpg.html]http://i784.photobucket.com/albums/yy126/steveherman/014_2.jpg (http://s784.photobucket.com/user/steveherman/media/011_3.jpg.html)/URL]http://i784.photobucket.com/albums/yy126/steveherman/012_4.jpg (http://s784.photobucket.com/user/steveherman/media/012_4.jpg.html)

Doozer
08-29-2015, 04:39 AM
If your drill press has the production table
you can use a surface grinder magnet
upside down to shuffle your vise
and stick it down.

-Doozer

Dunc
08-29-2015, 09:30 AM
I have a Myford of this style
http://www.busybeetools.com/products/vise-drill-press-tilting-jaw.html
Very convenient

bborr01
08-29-2015, 09:53 AM
Cardinal speed vise is my go to vise. They aren't real cheap but sometimes you can find a used one on ebay or craigslist.

Brian

Rosco-P
08-29-2015, 09:58 AM
On a production table or oil table (no slots), I'd lean toward a float lock or re purpose an old 8" milling vise for its mass.

Seastar
08-29-2015, 11:24 AM
Two Craftsman drill presses and two Wilton vises.
These have worked for all my needs for many years.
Bill

Spin Doctor
08-29-2015, 07:05 PM
I really prefer these

http://www.workholding.com/heindpvise.htm

Mcgyver
08-29-2015, 07:18 PM
different ones for different things, but overall my favorite as Jones and Shipman. Not sure if you can them anymore, but Bison is doing a knock off. J&S jaws are better though - the centre opening makes for a v block and clearance for large holes. Why I like them so much, ball bearing thrust mechanism and the hardened stepped jaws.....you never have to futz around with parallels. Really nice vises.


http://rotagriponline.com/index.php?page=shop.product_details&product_id=4312&flypage=shop.flypage&pop=0&keyword=vice&option=com_virtuemart&Itemid=29

oldtiffie
08-29-2015, 08:07 PM
Drill press vise, a lot to choose from. Plain screw vise, cam operated, self-centering, Safe-T vise (which looks like a bar clamp), and many others.

For general purpose drilling of assorted materials, (sheet, bar stock, wood, plastic), what do you use, what do you recommend?

Drill presses I'm using are 14" and 17" with production table.
Thanks,


So far as I am concerned anyway, almost any drill press vise that is sized according to your needs will do the job. After that its matter of what you want of it and how much you are prepared to pay for it.

The main thing I ask of a bench vise is that it will hold the job down to the vise without the moving/sliding jaw lifting the job. There are several ways of achieving that with "hold-downs" with a little inconvenience and minimal extra cost.

Metalwrkr
08-29-2015, 08:07 PM
I would go with something with an X-Y table either vise mounted on top or visit integrated. Much easier to make small adjustments to your securely held part as needed as well as making straight evenly spaced holes if needed.

oldtiffie
08-29-2015, 09:33 PM
My pedestal drill has a round column. It also has a rotating table which is raised/lowered on a rack and pinion.

Its quite easy to raise/lower the table as well as rotating it about the column axis and its own vertical axis.

The table can easily be "tilted" left/right.

I have had that Taiwanese drill for over 40 years and have not had a problem with it. It moves and clamps easily and the very good drill chuck is still as good as the day I bought it.

So I have no problem with adjustment in any plane or axis.

boslab
08-30-2015, 04:15 AM
If your drill press has the production table
you can use a surface grinder magnet
upside down to shuffle your vise
and stick it down.

-Doozer
Like that, clever, I have a 8" round magnetic I never use, I think a use just arrived, didn't want to drill holes in it by using the other way up, did try turning with it, worked but a little scary as I'm not used to free floating bits of plate, it's only ever been handy for washers,
Mark

Rex
08-30-2015, 11:35 PM
On my 15" Powermatic with production table, I am using a 4" import angle-lock milling vise.
This one was a junker not suitable for a mill, but after some cleanup it's just right for the DP, and I don't worry about putting a divot in it.