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winchman
09-02-2015, 04:26 PM
I spent the last couple days putting together this differential spreader for the guys in the automotive shop.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/1003/winchman/Differential%20spreader%20007_zpswwplhmzr.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/1003/winchman/Differential%20spreader%20002_zps1cwu62cx.jpg

The vertical bars are each made of two pieces of 1/4 x 2" flat bar held together with short pieces of 1/2" round secured with plug welds. The jacking bar and upper bar are made of 3/4 x 1 3/4" plate off-cuts out of the scrap bin. The 16 x 1.5mm screw is part of a tie-rod off a pickup truck, and the thrust bearing was salvaged from a scrap automotive AC compressor.

The tool can be bolted directly to the differential housing with one bolt per side, or the triangular plate can be used to pick up more than one hole on each side for heavier pulls.

The extra washer and retainer keep the thrust bearing from falling off when handling the tool.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/1003/winchman/Differential%20spreader%20003_zps2px5lcrw.jpg

The retainer gets tight at the same time the threads are no longer visible in the witness hole to let you know you need to move to the next hole on the adjuster bar.

It's probably heavier than it really needs to be, but I wanted it to last a while.

DICKEYBIRD
09-02-2015, 04:33 PM
Great job W/M! Looks manly enough to do the job.:)

winchman
09-08-2015, 03:47 PM
Here's a picture of the spreader in use.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/1003/winchman/image1%20Diff%20spreader%20in%20use_zpsvofvkxnu.jp g

ncjeeper
09-08-2015, 04:40 PM
Nice. I regeared my Dana 70 axle and had to use a spreader to get the case out.

Doozer
09-08-2015, 04:52 PM
Pure stupidity.
There was nothing wrong with the adjusting collars that the bearings used to have.
Now you adjust the contact pattern with shims. Pure bullshlt.
I bet GM came up with this cost cutting nonsense.

-Doozer

jdunmyer
09-08-2015, 08:01 PM
Doozer,
I think it was Dana who came up with that design, my 1964 Jeep used it. Back then, there were cast-in holes in the rear of the housing to accept the pins in the spreader. It worked OK, and it isn't like adjusting the gears is something you do on a weekly basis.

Doozer
09-08-2015, 08:14 PM
I guess I am living in the past again.
The last Dana 44 I had open was from a '56 Studebaker,
and it had the bearing adjusters, just like a 9" Ford.

-D

wierdscience
09-08-2015, 11:29 PM
Pure stupidity.
There was nothing wrong with the adjusting collars that the bearings used to have.
Now you adjust the contact pattern with shims. Pure bullshlt.
I bet GM came up with this cost cutting nonsense.

-Doozer

Probably the same guy that said "I know,let's use a C-clip to hold the axle in,then we can use the axle itself for the axle bearing race.Then we can use tubing from a kids swing set for the housing tubes and get the costs down to $1.95 per unit.

Then they promoted him.

George Seal
09-09-2015, 06:26 AM
I am confused ( nothing new ) is this to hold the differential while adjusting pinion gear


OR does it spread something as in pull a part since we are calling it a Spreader

Willy
09-09-2015, 07:58 AM
The spreader is used as per Winchman's photo in post#3.
The spreader's function is to spread open the differential carrier housing in such a manner so as to enable the insertion of shims in order to achieve the required carrier bearing preload.
The tool essentially stretches the house slightly in a controlled manner.

vpt
09-09-2015, 08:01 AM
I am with doozer, if a rear needs a spreader or has bearings riding on the axles it gets tossed and real rear end is used.

Willy
09-09-2015, 11:58 AM
I am with doozer, if a rear needs a spreader or has bearings riding on the axles it gets tossed and real rear end is used.

Yeah great idea, except for the fact that about 90% of light truck drive axles currently in use require such a tool. About the only type that do not require this type now are the removable carrier housing type.
If the differential comes out of the removable inspection cover on the back you'll likely need this tool.

As an example, what would you use as a replacement rear axle for your Powerstroke Ford?
Don't tell me that doesn't have a real rear end.:)

Doozer
09-09-2015, 12:01 PM
Eaton.

-D

Willy
09-09-2015, 12:12 PM
And Eaton axle housings are available in a wide verity sizes? I know they make a lot of commercial axles.
Something to cover the ground lost when tossing the Dana, Chrysler, GM, Ford, American Axle types.

gvasale
09-09-2015, 03:35 PM
My Chrysler manuals specify them for certain axle types namely those with a non removable center section. The '69 Dodge manual shows the tool on a 7 1/4 and 9 3/4 setups. They should know how it's done.

Wasn't the Dana 60 in a B body a REAL axle setup?

ncjeeper
09-09-2015, 05:00 PM
Probably the same guy that said "I know,let's use a C-clip to hold the axle in,then we can use the axle itself for the axle bearing race.Then we can use tubing from a kids swing set for the housing tubes and get the costs down to $1.95 per unit.

Ah the good old Dana 35 axle. You can break that thing just going to get groceries.

vpt
09-09-2015, 07:10 PM
Yeah great idea, except for the fact that about 90% of light truck drive axles currently in use require such a tool. About the only type that do not require this type now are the removable carrier housing type.
If the differential comes out of the removable inspection cover on the back you'll likely need this tool.

As an example, what would you use as a replacement rear axle for your Powerstroke Ford?
Don't tell me that doesn't have a real rear end.:)



You know I wasn't even thinking of the full floater when I made the comment. I was thinking more of the rear ends where the axle goes out when a bearing goes. That is a great design! Truck wise I like a full floater.

As for the shims I have never used a spreader on the full floater sterlings or dynas, just tap them in.

firbikrhd1
09-09-2015, 08:01 PM
I am with doozer, if a rear needs a spreader or has bearings riding on the axles it gets tossed and real rear end is used.

It would be hard to argue that the Dana 60 isn't one of the strongest auto differentials out there. Among other vehicles it was used with great success by Chrysler Corp. behind the 426 Hemi, various versions of the 440 as well as other HD or Hi-Po applications. Today there may be other differentials out there than can stand the abuse the Dana 60 can, but most cannot.

wierdscience
09-10-2015, 01:45 AM
Ah the good old Dana 35 axle. You can break that thing just going to get groceries.

Yes it is a steaming pile that one..

GKman
09-10-2015, 07:34 AM
Can we really trust anyone who keeps a can of Raid on his bench?
Or has some need to?

BigMike782
09-11-2015, 08:19 AM
Can we really trust anyone who keeps a can of Raid on his bench?
Or has some need to?

It's to keep school board members out of the shop:D

CarlByrns
09-11-2015, 08:47 AM
Doozer,
I think it was Dana who came up with that design, my 1964 Jeep used it. Back then, there were cast-in holes in the rear of the housing to accept the pins in the spreader. It worked OK, and it isn't like adjusting the gears is something you do on a weekly basis.

My 1962 Dodge required a spreader and that was a semi-floater axle.

Willy
09-11-2015, 12:18 PM
I'm not really sure when the use of diff. case spreaders came into use, been a while though.
I remember using one when restoring a Triumph TR2, Girling rear axle I believe built in 52 or 53.
If one is careful pry bars can be used but so much easier with the proper tool.