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View Full Version : Book: Machining for Hobbyists - Karl H. Moltrecht



EddyCurr
09-04-2015, 10:53 PM
A new publication of interest to HSMers has been released
by Industrial Press. My copy arrived today.


Machining for Hobbyists
Getting Started
By Karl H. Moltrecht
Fran J. Donegan, Developmental Editor
Industrial Press
ISBN: 978-0-8311-3510-2

Paperback. 220 pgs

Many here will know that Mr Moltrecht is also the author of the
VERY comprehensive Machine Shop Practice Vol 1 & 2. The first
edition of which was published in 1971. I have copies of the
updated second edition which followed in 1981. The author passed
away in 1983.

.

EddyCurr
09-04-2015, 11:05 PM
Maybe MfH has already been discussed and I am just
late to the party.

If not, your choice of a free brickbat or widget to the
first person to name two of three HSM personalities
whom appear in the new publication.

.

EddyCurr
09-04-2015, 11:23 PM
Yep. I should have searched before posting


New Machinists (Hand) Book for Hobbyists from Industrial Press (USA) (http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/threads/67360-New-Machinists-%28Hand%29-Book-for-Hobbyists-from-Industrial-Press-%28USA%29)
oldtiffie - 2015.06.30

.

Toolguy
09-04-2015, 11:25 PM
What I want to know is why did it take them over 30 years to come out with the book?

loose nut
09-05-2015, 10:39 AM
Reprint????????????????

JCHannum
09-05-2015, 10:55 AM
The original Moltrecht books, a two volume set, was and still is an excellent reference for the beginning home shop machinist. I suspect this book is a distillation of the information in the originals geared directly toward the HSM, eliminating some dated and exteraneous material.

Why a 30 year wait? Why not, the originals were continuously available during this period at reasonable prices.

Ohio Mike
09-05-2015, 03:58 PM
Yep. I should have searched before posting


New Machinists (Hand) Book for Hobbyists from Industrial Press (USA) (http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/threads/67360-New-Machinists-%28Hand%29-Book-for-Hobbyists-from-Industrial-Press-%28USA%29)
oldtiffie - 2015.06.30

.

And we're still waiting for a review from someone that has a copy. Karl has been gone more than 30 years now. Without further information I have to assume that "Machining for Hobbyists" is an abridged version of the content in "Machine Shop Practice", Volumes 1 & 2.

quasi
09-05-2015, 04:04 PM
The 2Book set, the later published ones drop the shaper and planer chapters for CNC chapters.

metalmagpie
09-05-2015, 04:38 PM
Hey, if Jimi Hendrix can keep putting out records, why can't Moltrecht keep publishing books? :-)

Mcgyver
09-05-2015, 04:49 PM
Hey, if Jimi Hendrix can keep putting out records, why can't Moltrecht keep publishing books? :-)

so I paid attention to this for a while, and very consistently the greatest hits and compilation albums that come out every month outnumber new material about 5:1. Me thinks the music has died

back on topic, the 2 volume set is certainly worth having. Hopefully this (possibly greatest hits) is of help to some, maybe for the homeshop they could put shapers back in? :) It seems like a lot of folks don't have many books on the craft (or don't read them), which is shame...if you don't have several times as many book as you do machines, you're doing yourself a disservice. After all, no greatness is going to come from the machines without knowledge.

fjk
09-08-2015, 09:33 AM
I read the hobbyist book (electronic version)
(I meant to post a quick review on the original thread and then got diverted ... sorry)

In violation of the "if you don't have anything nice to say, don't say anything at all" principal my parents taught me when I was a young pup...

Waste of time and money ...
It looks like extracts from the (good) 2-vol set, with some added not-useful non-content to make it sound
like it was written for hobbyists.
I am _not_ an accomplished machinist, barely an un-accomplished one, and I didn't learn anything from the book.
I doubt anyone who occasionally skims this message board would learn much from it.
I am sure that anyone who has occasionally turned their lathe/mill/... on over the past year or two would learn nothing.

It sort of described several tools (mill, lathe, etc)
It didn't get into any "to turn a whatsit you frobincate the blording gefriminator" kinds of instruction/information.

It has, for example, the standard speeds-and-feeds charts ... but they are available all over the place, including in the 2-volume set.

YMMV
Frank

loose nut
09-08-2015, 04:12 PM
I wonder if the publisher had somebody take parts of his two volume set and redo it as a hobby manual and slapped his name on it. Hard to argue it when your dead.

EddyCurr
09-08-2015, 06:20 PM
And we're still waiting for a review from someone that has a copy.Here's my copy

http://www.slalom4me.com/imaged_a01/jpg/other/reference_mat/books/trades/2015.09.08_BookMachForHobbiests_01.jpg

One outright criticism I will level is about the omission of ANY
reference to Mr Moltrecht. Knowing that the author of the
Machine Shop Practice Vol 1 & Vol 2 passed away in 1983, I
looked to see whether an heir had picked up the torch. In a
word, no.

What has happened here is that an owner of content, Industrial
Press, has contracted with an editor-for-hire, Fran J. Donegal
to produce a "consumer title developed from technical information."
There is no crime in acknowledging this, but for one reason or
another, the stakeholders chose not to disclose it. Mr Donegal's
priors suggest that he is most experienced with producing 'lifestyle'
articles and publications. I appoint responsibility for the lack of
attribution to him in his role as Developmental Editor.

As for the book itself.

There are several areas where it succeeds as a reference for
hobbyists getting started in Machining.

Capitalizes on a large page format to make the most of
layout techniques modern readers have come to expect.
Very well illustrated with many excellent new photos, illustrations
figures and tables to compliment those brought forward from the
Machine Shop Practice volumes. The machines depicted are
drill presses, lathes, milling machines and so on of a class that
the target audience are likely to own or aspire to.
The content incorporates reprints of several articles by J. Randolph
Bulgin and Sandro Di Filippo which first appeared in Home Shop Machinist.
Those of you who are familiar with the authors may join me in acknowledging
the quality of their work. These inclusions are relevant and useful additions.
There are numerous sidebars with detailed explanations, cautions,
"How Tos" and so on.
Many, many of the superb tables and illustrations from Moltrecht's
own Machine Shop Practice volumes are reproduced here.
The Overview, Measuring Tools, Machines & Materials and Drill Press
chapters give the novice a good introduction to many aspects within
these subject topics.

There are areas where the book come up short. Some of which are:

Three or more times, six pages are dedicated to reprinting the
"Recommended Cutting Speeds" table from Moltrecht's original books
with the only difference being a red band around the column denoting
"Turning", "Milling" or "Drilling/Reaming".
Not only is this redundant, the table contains FAR too many examples
of material to possibly be meaningful to a novice on first reading.
In a different approach, the body text of the book would have featured
a few examples using the kind of material a novice is likely to have at
hand. The comprehensive table would have appeared once in an appendix.
This appendix entry would have been preceeded by an introduction
discussing the whys & hows of derating Moltrecht's values to suit HSM
class equipment.
Very short shrift is given to the matter of sharpening HSS tool bits.
No mention was observed of the most appropriate abrasives to use for
working HSS vis-a-vis carbide.
My belief is that poor tool bit performance leads to results that are a
big disincentive for novice machinists.
Hand-shaped HSS tooling works best for small machines, IMO. Not only
are carbide inserts expensive, they require speeds and depths of cut that
can tax the power and rigidity of small HSM-class machinery.
Consequently, I feel much more effort should have gone into explaining
to a novice how to prepare and maintain HSS tool bits.

I am going to stop fault-finding here. I am in a snarky mood due to
other facets of life. Carrying on would be uncharitable to a book which
I believe at its core to be well-intentioned.

To sum up, my vote is that "Machining for Hobbyists" has value for those
getting started. It isn't perfect, but I have yet to discover the book that
is. At less than US $25 for the printed version, there are many reasons for
the novice to add this to their burgeoning collection of reference materials.

.

Edit: Hobbyist, not hobbiest

sasquatch
09-08-2015, 06:38 PM
Good Post EddyCurr.

Ohio Mike
09-08-2015, 09:00 PM
Good Post EddyCurr.

Yes, thank you for taking the time to share.

Mcgyver
09-08-2015, 11:28 PM
One outright criticism I will level is about the omission of ANY
reference to Mr Moltrecht. Knowing that the author of the
Machine Shop Practice Vol 1 & Vol 2 passed away in 1983, I
looked to see whether an heir had picked up the torch. In a
word, no.


thanks for the good post. This always struck me as ultimate in publishing sleaze. I remember buying a Ludlum novel once and thinking part way in "this is bloody awful". Turns out the estate had hired a writer after he died and this was one one them. Some hack wrote it and the they slap the late great authors name on the front in huge letters to trick you into buying it. It's not write.