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Tony
11-09-2015, 10:57 AM
After a close call at almost buying on of those ebay-special desktop CNC routers
I decided to try my hand at a home-built; got my video camera along for the ride too.


Fixed gantry / Moving bed (Y axis) .. about 36" x 15" (900x400) with 8" (200mm) of Z.


biggest problem I ran into so far is a suitable spindle.. in the meantime I purchased a
1.5kW import spindle with VFD but its much too fast (on paper, haven't tried it yet). it'd
be great to find the head off of a small milling machine.


Anyway, here's Part 1 for now.. if there's interest I'll post the others as I get through them.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K9UA9ZRFwWU


-Tony

skunkworks
11-09-2015, 11:08 AM
Awesome!

(and extra points for getting the children involved)

sam

ed_h
11-09-2015, 12:44 PM
More! More!

Ed

garyhlucas
11-09-2015, 01:22 PM
LittleMachineShop.com sells the minimill head, motor etc as separate items.

Black Forest
11-09-2015, 01:39 PM
Great video Tony. To the rest of you all Tony's voice reminds me of someone's on TV but I can't place it. Every time I watch one of your videos Tony I keep wracking my brain whose voice is that.

Tony
11-09-2015, 01:44 PM
Thanks all! gary: good tip, I'll look into that.

Black: i've been told on more than one occasion that I sound like Alan Alda -- maybe he the guy you're thinking about?

I once did a video with the Mash intro / theme music but pulled it last minute in fear of the youtube police.

Black Forest
11-09-2015, 01:48 PM
Thanks all! gary: good tip, I'll look into that.

Black: i've been told on more than one occasion that I sound like Alan Alda -- maybe he the guy you're thinking about?

I once did a video with the Mash intro / theme music but pulled it last minute in fear of the youtube police.

I had thought of Alan actually but in my mind it is someone who does one of those home improvement shows.

I looked at your video today of your rebuild of a cheap drill press. Maybe I will repurpose mine to mount on my drilling and tapping arm for my fixturing table.

Toolguy
11-09-2015, 01:51 PM
There's a spindle on Amazon that's supposed to be pretty good. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B010P66BX8?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_search_detailpage&tag=viglink20859-20. The person that got one says it's about 2HP and 20,000 RPM. He has one and is getting 2 more.

Tony
11-09-2015, 02:13 PM
Toolguy, that's exactly the one I have -- I mean I bought it on ebay but I'm going to go out on a ledge and wager
they're all from the same place. I'm hoping my machine will turn out rigid enough to mill steel (albeit in bitty steps)..
just getting 2D contours out of mild steel plate would really help in the shop.

But even with carbide the spindle speeds for those import motors is too high.. they really are meant for wood/engraving,
though I think I can pull off aluminum (with carbide) just fine. The ER16 collets only go up to 10mm if I'm not mistaken
so we're talking small cutters.

That said I'll definitely keep you posted to how this performs.

My first video once the machine is done will be of a reduced shank 2" flycutter at 24k rpm. - I kid I kid!

Axkiker
11-09-2015, 05:56 PM
That is really really close to how I had planned to build one. I just havent had the time to get started. If I ever get around to building it I also hope to mill aluminum and steel with it. I dont expect it to be a HAAS or anything but I have the time to wait for it to cut.

Ill be interested in how yours performs.

Have you thought about possible building your own spindle ??

TOOLZNTHINGS
11-09-2015, 09:38 PM
Absolutely excellent !! Please post more progress.
I'll keep the spacer idea in mind on my next tig weld project.

Brian

Paul Alciatore
11-09-2015, 11:12 PM
Great video and the beginning of a great build. Keep them coming.

wierdscience
11-10-2015, 12:19 AM
Tony,I could have sworn you were taller in your last vid;)

Looks good so far,I think I would have stress relieved the channel and flat bar first.The linear rail surface I would have buttered with some metal filled epoxy and plunked it face down on an oiled Bridgeport table while it cured.That would have gave you two coplanar straight surfaces to receive the linear rails without machining the channel IMHO.

Keep'm coming though,much better than anything on TV!

mattthemuppet
11-10-2015, 01:40 AM
that was fun! better than working, that's for sure :)

You should consider narrating documentaries, you have a very pleasant voice to listen to, especially for an American ;) No David Attenborough, but he is a giant among men.

Tony
11-10-2015, 06:44 AM
Thanks all, I appreciate the feedback -- let's hope this thing turns out right -- no pressure now, huh?!

Mike Amick
11-10-2015, 12:32 PM
I honestly think your project has no choice but to turn out good. Your methodology is excellent.

mattthemuppet
11-10-2015, 12:34 PM
oh no, none at all. Quick question - I expected you to weld those screw rails onto the C-channel backplate and then screw into them through the side of the C-channel. Did you do it the other way because it would better resist the opening of the C-channel (forces in shear on the screws rather than tension I guess) or some other reason?

Tony
11-10-2015, 01:09 PM
Did you do it the other way because ... or some other reason?

I did it my way because I didn't think of your way. :o

Tony
11-13-2015, 07:29 AM
Re: spindles for cutting steel -- thought I'd ask here.. just how much effort goes into building one's own?
I've been doing some reading online but it's tough to find that practical view point between just gett'n 'er done
and high precision-million-dollar-bearing-cylindrical-ground spindle.

I've got a lathe and a mill .. and I'd like to make a small rigid spindle that runs in the 500-2000 rpm range, using
maybe a 1/2 or 3/4HP motor.

avoiding stepped pulleys would be nice, to save the weight, but then I'd need to tackle speed control.

Any advice welcomed. I'm sure i'm not the first crossing this bridge. Thanks!

ammcoman2
11-13-2015, 09:23 AM
I bought this book many years ago http://www.camdenmin.co.uk/products/workshop-practice-series-no-27-spindles and have built at least 4 different spindles for projects in the shop. It is easy to follow the author's logic in designing the various configurations. My only criteria for the bearings used in my builds was to use well known brands.

Good luck.

Geoff

DR
11-13-2015, 01:05 PM
One suggestion, if it's not too late.......

Leave room under "Z" axis to add a rotary axis in the future. You have plenty of Z travel at 8", but how about room under it when in it's lowest position?

By popular demand Rockler Woodworking has added a rotary axis option attachment to their CNC Sharks. Flat routing is fine, but it gets old after awhile (you can only rout some many signs). A rotary axis expands your possible uses many times to turnings, etc, etc.

Too late now, I think from experience I'll never build a welded structure again. Too much distortion from the welding unless you have the whole thing stress relieved and machine all mount pads.

Other than those points, looks good and nice video. Looking forward to more.

Oh, what controller will you use?

mattthemuppet
11-13-2015, 02:15 PM
I did it my way because I didn't think of your way. :o

that's a good enough reason :)

As for spindles, if you can line bore the housing I would have thought it will come down to how much decent high grade bearings will cost. If you make it with an ER system (ER25 for this?) collets will be cheap. I wonder if you could line bore the housing, fit the spindle and then set up the housing with spindle on the bed of the lathe. If you can chuck up the spindle and indicate it true relative to the lathe spindle, bed and router housing, any work done on the router spindle should be perfectly true to the housing. Not sure if that's over thinking it or not though..

no idea about motors though. Do servo motors have a high enough torque and speed range?

Tony
11-13-2015, 02:17 PM
Thanks Geoff, I'll have a look.

DR: I have 8" of clearance under the lowest part of the Z axis. Z axis travel is actually 6". I figured 6" + a 2" endmill should
be worst case scenario. I wanted to keep that height as low as possible for obvious reasons. Once done, I plan to 'map the table' and
install a vise on a riser block in the best performing area.

That'll probably be 80-90% of my work.. I don't expect to be doing parts much larger than 6"x6" or so.
Anything bigger likely won't need the same tight tolerances as a smaller part. Make sense?

In theory I could spin, what.. 5-6" diameter parts in a 4th axis.

Controller: mach3 + smoothstepper

-Tony

DICKEYBIRD
11-13-2015, 09:58 PM
I just wanted to tell you Tony that I watched your video and was very moved by it. I'm recovering from a stroke and it was PERFECT therapy for me. I've done a little video work years ago and let me say that yours is very well thought-out and the music is perfect. You have a marvelous gift and I'm very glad you took the time to edit the piece and share it with us. Getting your son into it was heart warming...made me cry with joy! Both you & he will look back on it some day and realize it is priceless!

Bravo Tony!

ps: The machine is awesome too! Let me guess, LinuxCNC for control?

Tony
11-14-2015, 04:17 AM
what a welcomed change -- most people tell me my video gave them a stroke! :D

not to make light, all in good fun mind you, I'm glad you're doing well.

I've used Mach3 in the past on a windows machine, I plan to stick with that for now.

DICKEYBIRD
11-14-2015, 07:46 AM
I've used Mach3 in the past on a windows machine, I plan to stick with that for now.Me too! You just seemed to have the kind of intelligent confidence that most Linux experts seem to have. I'm doing most of my CNC work with a lathe and Mach3 Turn via the parallel port. Threading without an encoder sucks.

QSIMDO
11-14-2015, 10:08 AM
There's a spindle on Amazon that's supposed to be pretty good. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B010P66BX8?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_search_detailpage&tag=viglink20859-20. The person that got one says it's about 2HP and 20,000 RPM. He has one and is getting 2 more.

Is that strictly for CNC then?

chrisinestes
11-14-2015, 11:23 AM
Signing on to the thread...

I have a 4' x 8' CNC router table with a 5 HP Perske spindle. I'm also running Mach3 with a USB smoothstepper. I've routed 6061 Aluminum several times, but I mostly route wood, and some plastics.

Chris

Tony
11-26-2015, 01:05 PM
hey folks.. hope you're having a relaxing thanksgiving. Just on off chance
you're not a subscriber (tsk!tsk!), though I'd share part 2 of the CNC build.

Hope you like it. comments/criticisms welcomed.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ntW0aTW92w

bikepete
11-27-2015, 06:33 AM
hey folks.. hope you're having a relaxing thanksgiving. Just on off chance
you're not a subscriber (tsk!tsk!), though I'd share part 2 of the CNC build.

Hope you like it. comments/criticisms welcomed.

Like the first one that was SUPERB! Inspired me to get back out into my very cold workshop :-)

Many thanks for making these videos!

DICKEYBIRD
11-27-2015, 08:51 AM
Your video skills are AMAZING! A couple commercials & those would be on cable. I don't know where you find the time to put all that together AND build that awesome machine. You must be "in the business." Bravo!

michigan doug
11-27-2015, 01:06 PM
Excellent content and excellent presentation. If you wanted to make a youtube channel teaching anything, I predict you will do well. Or maybe you have a day job and don't need or want 100,000 people following your every move on youtube.

And finally, what a fantastic helper. It appears that you both benefit enormously from his presence in the shop.

finest regards,

Tony
11-28-2015, 03:33 PM
Thanks all.. Dickey.. I used have much less time till I found out the kid liked being in the shop.. now I have a deal with
mom.. as long as he doesn't lose a finger.. more shop time!

though he does like to pull everything out of the toolboxes and lay it out on the floor.. he'd pull the casters if
he could figure out how. figure its only a matter of time.

Axkiker
11-28-2015, 03:39 PM
Out of curiosity did you quote having the part you needed milled flat surface ground ??

Bruce Griffing
11-28-2015, 03:39 PM
Nicely done videos. The project looks great as well. I do have a couple of comments. If you want flat material for the x-y stage, I would look into aluminum jig plate (mic6,etc). It will have the flatness and stability you seek and should be more than a strength match for the rest of your machine. It won't have the damping of cast iron, but it allow for a quicker machine due to lower mass. A question on your rails - will there be anything other than bolt down friction holding them in place?

Tony
11-29-2015, 03:35 PM
Axkiker: I did not have that quoted no, milling it was the low hanging fruit ($$).

Bruce: Aluminum is very appealing though I've been trying to steer clear of it to keep the machine all one material (steel), to keep
out any thermal expansion issues. My shop sees some big temp swings; over the distances between bearings on my machine I could
see up to 0.040"-0.050" differences (which would bow the table).

Yes the rails are only bolt down.. I've been wondering what to do about those.. maybe I can pin them at the ends and once in the middle?
I know they sell little rail "cams" to take the float out of the bolt holes, but I'm trying not to get over my head.

In the latest news, I have found some material for the table. I went to visit a few local injection mold shops in the area looking for a ground
tooling plate -- no luck there but I got a heck of a lot of great cut-offs at less than scrap prices.. some nice CRS flats that'll do great for now
(I can make the table in 2-3 "slats")... only downside is they're heavy.. 3/4" -- so I'm going to take a hit on speed / acceleration on that axis.

It's a temp fix (given the price).. but it'll keep me going and having some fun till something better turns up.

I'm not overly concerned about a flat table: i plan to use a riser block and vise for 90% of the 'work' -- i can cut that flat. anything bigger and
I'm fine with 5 or even 10 thou error.. mostly likely big = wood or sheet goods. I don't expect to ever need to make my own engine block out
of billet, at any rate. :)

Boostinjdm
12-14-2015, 12:19 AM
Did the sand take the ring out of the frame? I'm putting together a new workbench and would rather not set off every dog in the county when smacking it with a hammer.

Tony
12-21-2015, 09:23 AM
Boost.. well.. it doesn't seem to ring.. but can't say for sure it's the sand.

Just a quick update -- I might be done. Hardly seems possible.. but other than making a stand for the computer stuff..
and adding air and power line drop from the ceiling.. well, I might be done (for now!).

Will share some pictures here.. might be a week still before I get the video put together.. but stay tuned.

I have been making chips.. aluminum doesn't seem to be a problem at all, I can 'hog' (it's an ER11 collet!) at about
32 IPM with an 8mm cutter @ 8mm deep. HSS. once i get some carbide I'll try to push it a little harder. still getting
up to snuff with the CAM. (Fusion)

spindle is way too fast (7200rpm) for steel though I did cut some 1/16" sheet metal to make the guards/shields.


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0903/knucklehead/cnc/cncA_zpss45faluf.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0903/knucklehead/cnc/cncB_zpsftlffwhj.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0903/knucklehead/cnc/cnc4_zpsafybhcpl.jpg

Boostinjdm
12-21-2015, 03:23 PM
I'd really like to hear your thoughts on fusion. I've been using AutoCAD, but recently got a VMC and will need something with CAM.

Axkiker
12-21-2015, 03:42 PM
Did you add any provisions for coolant??? I have thought about building something similar for years and contemplated what I would do.

Axkiker
12-21-2015, 03:57 PM
Curious how you went about deciding on the size stepper motors to use. Is there a general rule of thumb based on the spindle size etc ??

It was mentioned earlier you were unsure of the spindle but went with a 1.5kw for now. Do you have plans on upping the spindle size??? IF so from who ??? It seems like there are only so many to choose from and they top out at just a couple HP... Any thoughts on adapting something from a larger unit ??

Tony
12-22-2015, 10:25 AM
Fusion: so far I like it for the CAM. Learning curve ain't so steep. Getting the numbers right that make your machine happy
is a different story. I'm a solidworks guy so I hate the CAD side of Fusion.. but for quick stuff.. pockets, slots, etc etc it's pretty
straightforward.

Coolant: sooner than later I'll probably add a mister. currently i have just an air blast at the cutter to clear chips and I throw
coolant in there manually.

Motors: this is a tough one.. the accelerations are really what get you, and they're not super straight forward to calculate.. but I
already had steppers before the build (from a previous project). I did some research trying to find other builds and their numbers
for a 'relative sizing' kind of thing. Turns out that with 6 amp / 700 oz stepper I can move 120lbs via a 5mm pitch screw at
200 ipm. I bet I could do 200. So you can scale those numbers if that helps.

Spindle: yeah I went with this one quite frankly because of the price. hard to beat to get a guy started: spindle, vfd, and collet set
for less than $300. What I'd like to do is build an 'add on' spindle.. something that gears this thing down to steel cutting speeds.
The idea being I can load the tool in either collet.. depending what speed range I need. but if I go this route I'll lose some X axis
travel because of the 2 side by side spindles.

boslab
12-22-2015, 12:01 PM
Is there any reason that if your gantry is wide enough that you can't have 2 spindles cutting at the same time, or 3 even, I'm thinking along the lines of draw fronts and carved panels for kitchen units, something I will be making soon, God willing that is.
Mark

Tony
12-23-2015, 09:57 AM
I don't see why not, as long as you have a long enough gantry and enough power in that motor to push 2 or 3 spindles through your material.

Tony
01-04-2016, 10:49 AM
3rd and final installment.
let me know what you think.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZJCxMN9NWk

DICKEYBIRD
01-04-2016, 07:21 PM
WOW! What do I think? I think it's great! Took me all day to watch it in little bits 'cuz I was at work & real busy but I loved it. Great info & craftsmanship, both the metal work & the video work. Thank you very much for taking the time to put it all together.:) Makes we want to go out & start myself a new machine.

(Can't believe I'm the only one here to rave about it. Wassamatter wid yuse guys?)

rythmnbls
01-04-2016, 08:04 PM
I love the look on your sons face right at the end, priceless.

Well done.

Steve.

TOOLZNTHINGS
01-04-2016, 09:05 PM
You present the best in your videos and they are a joy to watch !! Hope you do more in the future. Love the craftsmanship and engineering, well done.

Brian

wierdscience
01-04-2016, 10:03 PM
Excellent!

darryl
01-05-2016, 12:39 AM
Excellent build and presentation! I enjoyed watching the progress. I'd like it even better if I had some similar machine in my shop-

Axkiker
01-05-2016, 10:28 AM
Im really amazed at how much / fast that machine cuts aluminum. Now I think I gotta build one

Tony
01-05-2016, 10:37 AM
If I haven't said this already, the next project on the hotlist is a better spindle.. something slower.
I'm actually wondering if I could use an ER16 extension collet holder in some bearings and the planetary drive
out of an old cordless drill to slow it down to steel cutting speeds. those planetaries pack a punch in reduction vs. size..

Fasttrack
01-05-2016, 10:55 AM
Very impressive, Tony! Don't know how you find the time for not only the construction project but also for filming, narrating, editing, etc. Great job.

QSIMDO
01-05-2016, 11:29 AM
Truly enjoy your work and ability to share it.
Most enjoyable!
Also envious of your son's education and the resulting swag!!

ikdor
01-05-2016, 02:23 PM
That router build is awesome with a capital A. A lot of decent engineering went into that.
Makes me want to buy a welding set. ....

Igor

DICKEYBIRD
01-05-2016, 03:05 PM
I'm actually wondering if I could use an ER16 extension collet holder in some bearings...That'd definitely work but why not step up to ER32. I think you'd regret being stuck with 3/8" or 10mm shank tools. I bought an ER32 chuck with 1" straight shank from CTC Tools in Hong Kong and was real happy with the price & quality. Stuck a pair of inexpensive deep groove sealed bearings on it, made a quick & dirty housing for it & it worked fine for an emergency cobbled-up CNC lathe with a belt-reduced treadmill motor. This was back when I didn't know that one has to have a special license & bearings made out unobtanium to build an "acceptable" spindle.;) I just adjusted the preload carefully & used it for a long time at up to 2800 rpm & it never got loose or noisy. Of course if I had it to do over I'd build it closer to "accepted" practice with higher quality angular contact bearings or whatever.

DICKEYBIRD
01-05-2016, 03:06 PM
Sorry, the dreaded double post!

bob_s
01-05-2016, 03:18 PM
If I haven't said this already, the next project on the hotlist is a better spindle.. something slower.
I'm actually wondering if I could use an ER16 extension collet holder in some bearings and the planetary drive
out of an old cordless drill to slow it down to steel cutting speeds. those planetaries pack a punch in reduction vs. size..

May require more than one stage of speed reduction, but doable.

5:1 reduction gets you to 4k, about 210 inches per second on a 1 inch tool, VFD could get you down to 2k and 100 inches per second

Tony
01-05-2016, 04:56 PM
I haven't actually counted teeth but from what I see online the typical ratios are 20:1 and 50:1 (2 speed settings).. take those with a grain
of salt of course.

My min speed (if I use my current spindle to drive this) is 7200 RPM -- which means I could get down to 150-350 and use the VFD to
get back up the power curve.

DICKEY: I considered 32's.. I actually have a full set for my mill.. but this is still a small router table.. I'd hate to think the damage I
could do if I could actually load a 1" tool into the thing!

Peter.
01-05-2016, 05:27 PM
Gotta say, I just watched all three instalments and it was most enjoyable. Well done Tony, both on the project and the presentation!

Axkiker
01-05-2016, 07:05 PM
Any idea yet what kind of tolerances you are able to hold with it ??

DICKEYBIRD
01-06-2016, 11:00 AM
If I haven't said this already, the next project on the hotlist is a better spindle.. something slower.
I'm actually wondering if I could use an ER16 extension collet holder in some bearings and the planetary drive
out of an old cordless drill to slow it down to steel cutting speeds. those planetaries pack a punch in reduction vs. size..Hey Tony, dunno why but I thought of this old thread & hope it may be of help to you? Steve (S_J_H) was a GREAT guy & a wonderfully innovative contributor to the forum. Unfortunately, he passed away a while back. Man, I miss him & his projects!
http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/threads/31172-cordless-drill-planetary-gearsets-uses?highlight=PLANETARY

mattthemuppet
01-07-2016, 03:15 PM
thanks for that Tony, I really enjoyed all your videos. Very inspirational! I especially liked all the welding and the rubber band gun at the end, that was a hoot. I really have to learn how to weld at some point..

Axkiker
01-16-2016, 05:30 PM
I watched all of the videos over again to hopefully get ideas about what I want to build. Im curious about the nut and bolt sorta jack screws you rigged up for the X axis. If I remember correct the X axis was fully welded. Do the jack screws literally twist the steel into spec ????

Thanks

tmc_31
01-17-2016, 10:35 AM
Awesome build and video Tony! I watched it all in 2 sittings and thoroughly enjoyed it.

Tim

Tony
01-18-2016, 09:04 AM
Ax: the jack screws were only used to really hold the gantry "in space" while I welded, though I'm sure they could twist the C section
if you needed them to. The top of my vertical tubes were just saw cut, so the gantry was literally teetering. I used one jack to get it
square to the frame, and the second jack as simple spacer.

ironmonger
01-18-2016, 05:44 PM
Thanks Tony

I started out just a little bit curious, and ended up binge watching.

As a blacksmith that belongs to a group that encourages newcomers to the hobby, I especially enjoyed watching your son get involved. You never know what direction they will take. As your kids grow older it's fun to watch them doing things that you didn't think that they would remember. I never knew for sure if they were paying attention at all while they watched as I was working... they were.

Is Fusion still available? I was a 2D cad guy since release 9 or 10... don't quite remember. I have no traction in the Solidworks arena but I might stand a chance in a cad related product.

We'll stay tuned for V2.0 :>)

Tony
01-19-2016, 10:12 AM
Fusion is still available and in fact its completely free (so long as you don't use it to make more than $100k / year .. which is fortunate
because I've made $99,500.. from the comfort of my own couch.. AND I've lost 25 lbs!)

Fusion does CAD and CAM. In fact I think it did CAD before it ever added CAM but I could be wrong. Unless its a simple block with
a pocket or a hole in it, I model in Solidworks, then import to fusion to generate the CAM stuff.. but thats just a matter of habit, it's
always hard to change CAD environment.. but I'm sure for someone just starting out, or getting back into things, it'd be just fine.

Black Forest
01-20-2016, 03:29 AM
I have a question for you Tony. What spindle/motor would you put on your mill if you could pick anything you wanted without regard to price?

dian
01-20-2016, 04:45 AM
my choise:

http://shop.fischerspindle.com/epages/fp.sf/en_US/?ViewObjectPath=%2FShops%2Ffp%2FProducts%2F107002

starting at $20 000.

Tony
01-20-2016, 01:18 PM
Black: hard to say, I'm not really up to snuff on my spindles. I've seen some spindles around with built in tool changers.. that'd be nice.
though Dian's might work too, though looking at the price, I'm afraid they might have cut some corners. :)

Axkiker
01-20-2016, 01:33 PM
I would love to see you give building your own spindle a shot. HINT HINT :)

Black Forest
01-20-2016, 01:40 PM
Black: hard to say, I'm not really up to snuff on my spindles. I've seen some spindles around with built in tool changers.. that'd be nice.
though Dian's might work too, though looking at the price, I'm afraid they might have cut some corners. :)

I was sort of wondering if you were maybe thinking of putting a spindle capable of slower RPM's for working with steel a bit more easily?

Tony
01-20-2016, 03:49 PM
In all likelihood I'll probably have an 'add-on' spindle with a speed reduction, using my existing spindle to drive it.
It'd have huge bearings for the radial loads and a draw bar of some sorts.. I really don't like these ER collets.

unless this chinese spindle gives up the ghost .. in which case a 3ph motor with vfd and home brew spindle as above.

But yes, goal would be 1) slower rpm 2) very rigid.

tyrone shewlaces
02-07-2016, 01:56 PM
Tony got noticed. Little blurb on Hackaday today. Congrats.

http://hackaday.com/2016/02/07/a-home-cnc-built-by-someone-who-knows-their-stuff/

J Tiers
02-07-2016, 03:05 PM
That's pretty darn good for what is really open-loop CNC.

As far as I recall, there is no feedback, no measurement input back from the axes to correct the movement with.

DICKEYBIRD
02-07-2016, 05:37 PM
Little blurb on Hackaday today....If I was as precise & methodical/logical/analytical as Tony is, I don't think I would be happy about being praised in Hackaday.;)

(Yeah, I know Hackaday is supposed to be the cat's meow but his work is good enough to be touted someplace better than that!)

tyrone shewlaces
02-08-2016, 12:03 AM
I don't think I would be happy...
(Yeah, I know Hackaday is supposed to be the cat's meow but...)

I don't know anybody who would say it's "the cat's meow" - yea it doesn't exactly vet any of its articles at all.
But it's kind of like having your excellently executed but cottage-industry odd geek widget, which normally has no broad appeal at all, inexplicably showcased on the late show or something. All of a sudden your device becomes intriguing to a larger audience even though they don't understand it anyway.

I have to say, I've seen dozens of build threads and videos, but Tony threw in such perfectly timed humorous flashes in the videos that I enjoyed them that much more. The content would have been worth the purchase price alone - very good. But the subtle humor made it fun.

Tony
02-08-2016, 08:58 AM
well.. shucks! Thanks for that, I don't think I would've ever seen it.by the way, which is better, a cat's meow or a bees knees?

boslab
02-08-2016, 09:58 AM
Very enjoyable, very educational, easy to understand the narration(a point many tube jockeys miss!)
The end product is excellent and throwing in a bit of welding, drilling tapping etc breaks up the whole thing into chunks easily understood by folk trying to learn how to do it themselves.
Liked the heat sink, suitably massive, I had some drives on a machine I had to redo the heat sink as it was overheating, I ended up with a liquid cooled system (glycol, Ali plate, and a heater matrix/fan from a car heater, small pump on the return)
I also used heat transfer gunk, white stuff from RS
I built some nitrile rubber shields once for a grinder, I wrapped the rubber round roller blind tube, worked well as the thing was always taught, had to disable the ratchet pawl though.
I hope you do some more videos, did you do one on the cnc plasma or am I getting confused(again)
Thanks for the effort,
Mark

Tony
02-08-2016, 10:23 AM
yeah I kept a close eye on that heat sink, 3x 6amps peak I was a little nervous. Part of me expected to have to add liquid cooling.

I did do another follow up (after the steel cutting demo), on my start of a 4th axis. I'll put in another thread, maybe.
There is also another video on the classic end mill grinding fixture you see around.. the one for surface grinders. It was my
yearly round through the dull/broken batch and I thought I'd give Stevenson's fixture some air time.

I do enjoy making these things, makes me not feel so bad talking to myself in the garage. I'm not trying to keep up with anyone, but
my vids come along in fits and spurts -- sort of mirroring my garage hobby.. sometimes I get on a roll, sometimes just a little
burnt out and take a break.

Thanks again.

DICKEYBIRD
02-08-2016, 11:21 AM
...which is better, a cat's meow or a bees knees?Now that you mention it, bees knees are worth far more than a cat's meow. My (actually my wife's) cats aren't good for anything other than eating, sleeping, pooping and pilfering through the trash to drag out old shop towels & nitrile gloves to pile in front the shop door.:rolleyes: