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GEP
11-11-2015, 07:36 PM
Will a bymetal saw blade last twice as long ( or longer )then a carbon steel blade

CalM
11-11-2015, 07:44 PM
Not if all the teeth get ripped of while trying to cut something too thin, too hard, or just jumps out of the vise.

Bi-metal shines in predictable condition. Not really worth the money in the HS where the need is cut such a variety of materials.

When is the last time you just "wore out" a saw blade? More common is to destroy the teeth on one side or the other.

10KPete
11-11-2015, 07:44 PM
Yep. Properly used a quality bi-metal will easily outlast carbon. The initial cost is higher but the total cost of ownership
is much lower.

Pete

loose nut
11-11-2015, 07:52 PM
As CalM said, how often are bandsaws used properly.

GEP
11-11-2015, 08:01 PM
I bean buying the olson blades i do a lot of cutting with my horizontel band saw . Yes the blade does get dull. I mostly cut 1018 or 1020 2 1/2 dia. mild steel. Just ordred new blades today and was thinking i maybe should have switched to bymeetal blades witch i never used in my saw bevore to get a longer live of the blade.
Thanks for the imput

Toolguy
11-11-2015, 08:48 PM
I have found in my saws the bi-metal blades last 3-5 times longer. I use my equipment properly and take care of it. No blade will go very long with misuse and abuse.

chipmaker4130
11-11-2015, 10:24 PM
If you try a good bi-metal, variable pitch blade you'll never go back.

GEP
11-11-2015, 10:49 PM
What brand do you recomend

lakeside53
11-11-2015, 11:04 PM
I use Lenox Diemaster 2. Superb.

Most of mine come from here http://www.bandsawbladesdirect.com/band-saw-blades/?utm_source=bing-ads&utm_medium=ppc&utm_campaign=band-saw-blades

chipmaker4130
11-11-2015, 11:59 PM
I use Morse. There's a good 'web' price from Enco all the time for my size. (Old Taiwanese 4X6) I really like the 10-14 variable pitch, as it does a good job on a wide range of materials and thicknesses.

darryl
11-12-2015, 01:38 AM
Lennox Diemaster II is my blade of choice, abused or not. I can get 6 months out of one if I'm careful, but I have a hard time getting a week from a carbon blade. It ain't anywhere near worth using them.

bborr01
11-12-2015, 07:51 AM
Bi Metal blades are the only way to go. What size saw do you have? I have some bi-metal blades for a 4X6 saw that I sold. I'd make you a fair deal on them.

Brian

GEP
11-12-2015, 07:57 AM
I just ordred 2 olson carbon steel blades $ 21.50 bevore i started asking for opinions. If i am lucky 1 will last 1 month but i better use cutting fluid on each cut. The next time it will be bymeatal blades.

wierdscience
11-12-2015, 08:15 AM
I buy from Sawblade.com,we use their M42 bimetal blades at work.We cut tons of metal per month,mostly structural,but also stainless,aluminum and copper.We average 2 months or better out of a blade running coolant.

https://www.sawblade.com/order-601-series-haltbar-m42.cfm

(if you order from them,put "no calls please" in the comments box,otherwise they will bug you)

Bimetal blades do have a break in period as well,we run ours at the lowest feed rate for 3-4 hours before turning up the feed.

GEP
11-12-2015, 08:25 AM
Thanks wierdscience

bborr01
11-12-2015, 09:38 AM
I wouldn't waste my money on carbon steel blades unless all I used them for was cutting jello.

Brian


I just ordred 2 olson carbon steel blades $ 21.50 bevore i started asking for opinions. If i am lucky 1 will last 1 month but i better use cutting fluid on each cut. The next time it will be bymeatal blades.

metalmagpie
11-12-2015, 10:35 AM
I use Lenox Diemaster 2. Superb.

Most of mine come from here http://www.bandsawbladesdirect.com/band-saw-blades/?utm_source=bing-ads&utm_medium=ppc&utm_campaign=band-saw-blades

Curious .. their web site 'blade selector' on the DM2 page only lets me select up to 1/2" wide blades, and your bandsaw takes 3/4" blades. WTF??

I "inherited" a huge pile of bandsaw blades from Boeing Surplus and have been working my way through them for years now. The pile has substantially shrunk and one of these days I'll be back to buying new. And when I do, I'll almost certainly go back to Lenox DieMaster II which I used to use and advocate for years.

However, the OP should consider what has been going wrong with his blades. If they've been stripping lots of teeth then I might suggest carbon blades. True, they get dull, but they don't strip teeth. And when sharp, they cut just fine.

metalmagpie

bborr01
11-12-2015, 10:41 AM
If you are stripping teeth out of your band saw blade you are most likely using too coarse of blade for the job. Carbon blades are a waste of money in my book.

Brian


Curious .. their web site 'blade selector' on the DM2 page only lets me select up to 1/2" wide blades, and your bandsaw takes 3/4" blades. WTF??

I "inherited" a huge pile of bandsaw blades from Boeing Surplus and have been working my way through them for years now. The pile has substantially shrunk and one of these days I'll be back to buying new. And when I do, I'll almost certainly go back to Lenox DieMaster II which I used to use and advocate for years.

However, the OP should consider what has been going wrong with his blades. If they've been stripping lots of teeth then I might suggest carbon blades. True, they get dull, but they don't strip teeth. And when sharp, they cut just fine.

metalmagpie

lakeside53
11-12-2015, 11:45 AM
Yep... In my limited experience... It's because I'm too lazy to change the blades when thin cutting angles etc - thin sections, coarse teeth. I typically run 6/10 as a compromise. I do change for thick section Al to 4/6, and even have a 4.

The other reason I strip teeth - work not clamped down sufficiently (bad... ) and... cutting my endless supply of mystery metal - now I try a file or a small cut with an hand hacksaw first.

But.. I wear blades out way more than messing them up, so most of the time I'm doing ok. lol

CalM
11-12-2015, 12:24 PM
Lennox Diemaster II is my blade of choice, abused or not. I can get 6 months out of one if I'm careful, but I have a hard time getting a week from a carbon blade. It ain't anywhere near worth using them.

That's amazingly short blade life

I have the same 5/8ths blade in my Famco 6X12 that I've had for a couple of years.

Plain carbon steel blade, nothing special. I do tend to every cut though, and use the flood suds.

cuemaker
11-12-2015, 12:34 PM
We cut 4140HT, a variation of 4140HT with vanadium added, 304 and 316, 5-6 days a week for 8-12hrs a day. Lennox Classic Pro 4/6. Saw blades last 4-5 days in normal use. When we push our saws, 2-3 days. Only other saw blade to perform similarly or better is a DOALL Penetrator blade.

wierdscience
11-12-2015, 01:01 PM
Teeth stripping can be stopped on the odd now and then cut by backing up the cut with a block of wood or similar.

bborr01
11-12-2015, 03:46 PM
Best bet is to change to a finer tooth blade.

Back when I was working in a die room we had an old Grob bandsaw that didn't run. (at least not usable) I made a few blades for it and did a little fine tuning on the guides and it worked OK. Much nicer than having to walk to the tool room to use the bandsaw there.
One day a machine repairman came in and cut some thin stainless steel and wiped out a bunch of teeth of a bi metal blade. I was not a happy camper. I put a new blade in it and locked the saw out. A few days later my boss comes in and asks who locked out the bandsaw and why. I showed him the blade and the lock stayed on.

Stupid thing was that our sheet metal shop was right around the corner and they always kept finer tooth blades on their saws because they never worked in anything heavier that 10 gage.

Brian


Teeth stripping can be stopped on the odd now and then cut by backing up the cut with a block of wood or similar.

novak74
11-12-2015, 05:07 PM
I wouldn't even consider usin a bandsaw without a name brand bimetal blade.

J Tiers
11-12-2015, 07:14 PM
Another reason for tooth stripping is fast feed cutting irregular material. That's typically because the saw has no hydraulic feed, just one of those screen door springs, or only it's own weight, like a power hacksaw.

bborr01
11-12-2015, 09:14 PM
Yes, You can get away with murder if you can feed the stock into the saw slow enough. But it is too easy when cutting thin metals to push into it too fast. There goes a new blade.

Brian


Another reason for tooth stripping is fast feed cutting irregular material. That's typically because the saw has no hydraulic feed, just one of those screen door springs, or only it's own weight, like a power hacksaw.

darryl
11-12-2015, 09:39 PM
I get my blades locally, so I'm pretty much stuck with what they stock as far as tooth count. Usually it's 10-14 and they work pretty well for the variety of material I cut. For cutting thin stock with this blade a backup is a really good idea as Wierdscience suggested. I would have to special order a finer toothed blade, and I don't know if I would even get it. The shop where I usually buy my blades doesn't carry my size anymore, so I might be looking for a different supplier anyway.