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alsinaj
11-12-2015, 02:27 PM
I'm faced with pulling the splined hubs off the rear axle of my '63 Jaguar. I'm pretty sure the hubs haven't been removed for 52 years. It's reportedly a difficult job, and pretty much impossible without Churchill tool JD7, a 5-lb lump that is now selling on ebay for $800 (if you don't believe it, go to ebay and search on Churchill JD7).

So, I need to make this tool:

http://i293.photobucket.com/albums/mm56/alsinaj/Churchill%20JD7.png (http://s293.photobucket.com/user/alsinaj/media/Churchill%20JD7.png.html)

The thread on the central screw is 12 TPI and the ends of the body have female 52mm x something threads that screw onto the hub (one end has RH thread, the other LH for the left and right hubs, respectively). That looks fairly straightforward to make, but even with this tool, users report having to use a 4-foot cheater bar, a BFH, and heat. So, would it be worthwhile to make a differential screw puller like this?

http://i293.photobucket.com/albums/mm56/alsinaj/Jaguar%20hub%20puller%20cropped.jpg (http://s293.photobucket.com/user/alsinaj/media/Jaguar%20hub%20puller%20cropped.jpg.html)

If the outer screw is 1 x 8 tpi and the inner is 5/8 x 11, the effective TPI is 29, which should reduce the need to rent a gorilla.

Second question: I'm only going to use this tool 4 times at most, and I don't have a good set-up for hardening something this size. Given the pressures involved, do I absolutely have to harden this thing, or can I get away without?

boslab
11-12-2015, 02:32 PM
Should be alright, bit of copper grease maybe, nice drawing, shouldn't need diff puller, I use a cheap hydraulic one, or did I should say.
Mark

John Garner
11-12-2015, 03:33 PM
Differential screws sound better than the work, as they suffer big friction losses. If you're making your own puller, and want to modify the design, incorporating a hydraulic ram in place of the screw or changing the tension screw threadform to acme / trapezoidal or even square might end up making you happier.

RichR
11-12-2015, 04:39 PM
If the outer screw is 1 x 8 tpi and the inner is 5/8 x 11, the effective TPI is 29, which should reduce the need to rent a gorilla.
Maybe try a single 1/2-20 screw, or if you are feeling adventurous, a 3/8-24.

Mcgyver
11-12-2015, 05:00 PM
why not just make a 1" 30 tpi or something? Differential screws are a lot of work (made 'em) and the result is a weaker set up......really all you want is less inclined plane so up tpi

old mart
11-12-2015, 05:20 PM
You would have more leeway in the design if you made two bodies, one LH and the other RH. In the UK there was a hydraulic puller made by Picavant which I borrowed many years ago from my local garage, they had two and accidentally lent me the duff one. I filled it with grease and it worked long enough for my purposes. I would make a hydraulic tool utilising "o" rings, fitted with a grease nipple and powered by a grease gun.

Guido
11-12-2015, 05:37 PM
#6, old mart-------X---------2,3,4, whatever----

ed_h
11-12-2015, 08:44 PM
Those British must love tight hubs. The rear hubs on Triumph TR6 cars are notorious for being difficult to get into. There is a Churchill tool for those, too, but also selling for hundreds if you can even find one. This is my home made Churchill for the TR6. It is based around a Grade 8 3/4 inch nut and bolt. This, along with a cheater bar and lot of acetylene and swearing, finally cracked both of mine loose.

Ed

http://bullfire.net/TR6/TR6-36/SDC11646a.JPG

vpt
11-12-2015, 08:49 PM
I am pretty sure I just stuck the hubs in the hydraulic press and pressed them out.

alsinaj
11-12-2015, 10:07 PM
Ed-H, That sounds about right. The combination of a long taper with a long key in it makes lots of surface area for corrosion.

VPT, So you removed the hub, axle, and bearings as a unit and then pressed the axle out of the hub? Was it a Jag? Was the hub mounted on a taper with a big (long) key in it?

Mike Amick
11-12-2015, 10:25 PM
The hell with all that ... I want to see a pic of the car.

Ian B
11-13-2015, 05:03 AM
If you'r emaking it from scratch, how about incorporating an off the shelf hydraulic unit, instead of the screw. Something like this: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Spare-10-Ton-Hydraulic-Ram-for-Gear-Puller-Garage-Set-NEW-/120702439155?hash=item1c1a6d0ef3:m:mHivCVBefJbP2N-8abQYLpQ

Ian

vpt
11-13-2015, 07:29 AM
Ed-H, That sounds about right. The combination of a long taper with a long key in it makes lots of surface area for corrosion.

VPT, So you removed the hub, axle, and bearings as a unit and then pressed the axle out of the hub? Was it a Jag? Was the hub mounted on a taper with a big (long) key in it?


I did two of them, a 73 v12 car and a 63 I6 car. If I remember right the axles just slid out without any force then the hub can be taken to the press to get the hubs pressed out. I honestly don't remember the taper or key. These cars are just a blur of oddness to me when I work on them.

http://i.imgur.com/gKWOR2r.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/ypfc2Ow.jpg

Seastar
11-13-2015, 07:46 AM
Yep, old English cars are just a " blur of oddness".
At least my 57 Triumph TR3A is-----
Bill

bruto
11-13-2015, 10:06 AM
I used to have an old Scout with the brake drums mounted on a tapered axle shaft, and for that, I had a three jaw puller that bolted to wheel studs. They're mighty expensive nowadays, but this was the tool that really worked. I paid much less back in 1974 at Sears, of course, but it was the same tool as that shown. Too bad you're so far away, or i'd let you borrow mine.

http://www.zoro.com/otc-universal-hub-puller-7394/i/G2754141/?gclid=CObav8bVjckCFUQjgQodXnYPSQ&gclsrc=aw.ds

Dunc
11-13-2015, 10:29 AM
Those were the days... my youth & an E-Jag 2+2

Ian B
11-13-2015, 10:35 AM
If you do end up making one, why not make a few? Not that much more effort once you're set up, and then fleabay them - you're not the only one with those wheels and hubs, and I'd think that a hydraulic version would be far more effective than the original (albeit genuine Jaguar/Churchill) version.

Ian

alsinaj
11-13-2015, 12:49 PM
Bruto, Thanks for the offer, but I have splined hubs, so there are no studs to fasten that type of puller to.

VPT, Nice E-type. I'm not sure that my axles will come out so easily, as the tapered bearings in the ends of the axle tubes have to come out with them, and there's no way to exert any force except by banging on the brake rotor. But it the bearings are only a slip fit, it might work. Worth a try.

Ian B, If VPT's way doesn't work, I think I'll use the American version of that hydraulic hub puller (listed at $94) and make a couple of adapters - one for LH, one for RH.

What do y'all think would be the best type of steel for said adapters? 1144 (stressproof)?

RichardG
11-13-2015, 01:48 PM
If you have to make the thing at least you can resell it ,if they are that expensive you will get most of your money back.
Richard

vpt
11-13-2015, 05:16 PM
Bruto, Thanks for the offer, but I have splined hubs, so there are no studs to fasten that type of puller to.

VPT, Nice E-type. I'm not sure that my axles will come out so easily, as the tapered bearings in the ends of the axle tubes have to come out with them, and there's no way to exert any force except by banging on the brake rotor. But it the bearings are only a slip fit, it might work. Worth a try.

Ian B, If VPT's way doesn't work, I think I'll use the American version of that hydraulic hub puller (listed at $94) and make a couple of adapters - one for LH, one for RH.

What do y'all think would be the best type of steel for said adapters? 1144 (stressproof)?


With the two that I have done I know the axle itself is a slip fit (or should be when not rusted and stuff) to make it easier to change camber. You would take off the axle nut, tip the hub forward (if you are facing side of car) pop out the axle, and change the shims. Add to increase camber, take shims out to reduce camber. Slide axle back in hub, tighten nut, send car on its way.

alsinaj
11-14-2015, 12:28 AM
VPT, Right. That's because you have one of them fancy independent rear suspensions. Mine is a solid axle. No camber adjustment needed or possible. As you say, the key is rust and stuff. Only one way to find out. But this post has helped me sort out the options. Thanks all.

TGTool
11-14-2015, 09:38 AM
Discussion and photos of the E-type rear suspension reminds me of one incident from my youth. I'd just learned about the independent suspension with brake disks inboard and it was such an interesting arrangement compared to the solid axles of my experience. So the next time I saw an E parked in a slot I squatted down to see the bits for myself. So there I was with my head in the wheel well, more or less, when the owner returned to his car with an ahem and a funny look. I felt a little like getting caught taking a peek up the skirt. Much older now. I still enjoy a first hand look at interesting machinery and haven't lost interest in an occasional beaver shot.

Black Forest
11-14-2015, 12:28 PM
Discussion and photos of the E-type rear suspension reminds me of one incident from my youth. I'd just learned about the independent suspension with brake disks inboard and it was such an interesting arrangement compared to the solid axles of my experience. So the next time I saw an E parked in a slot I squatted down to see the bits for myself. So there I was with my head in the wheel well, more or less, when the owner returned to his car with an ahem and a funny look. I felt a little like getting caught taking a peek up the skirt. Much older now. I still enjoy a first hand look at interesting machinery and haven't lost interest in an occasional beaver shot.

I did about the same thing at my dentists office in Texas. I was sitting in the chair and waiting and waiting. Finally I got out of the chair and got down on my hands and knees trying to get a look at how the mechanism that raises the chair worked. Couldn't see it so I did what every inquiring mind would do. I whipped out my leatherman and proceeded to unscrew the access panel to get a good look inside. Doc came in while I had my head in his chair base. He asked me if I lost something! I told him I had to wait so long I got bored and was just having a look around. I put the panel back and he finished the job. After that time I never had to wait long for anything at his office.