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View Full Version : 2 similar SB lathes $2k price delta..?



Mr-Mike
02-12-2016, 07:36 PM
Been browsing for a lathe and decided to look at the used market. What might account for the difference in price of these two based only on what you see in the ads.

http://winchester.craigslist.org/tls/5412246125.html

http://allentown.craigslist.org/tls/5444307644.html

Don't spend much time on this guys, I am just getting a feel for what I should pay attention to and gain some more insight.

cheers!

Toolguy
02-12-2016, 07:40 PM
The owners.

flylo
02-12-2016, 07:51 PM
$1900

justanengineer
02-12-2016, 08:04 PM
One is reasonably priced and the other is not.

bob308
02-12-2016, 08:07 PM
one wants to sell his the other is fishing.

Brian H.
02-12-2016, 08:33 PM
Not that it justifies the price, but it is worth noting that the more expensive one is a 10K (Edit: Nope, wrong) - and has the large dials. There's a QCTP in the far right corner of the bed tray, and it also appears to have a factory original micrometer stop. Also a DC motor, judging by the controller on the wall behind? The less expensive lathe has none of those, though it seems to be a nice machine with the quick-change gearbox and what looks like an underdrive cabinet.

-Brian

Edit: Sorry, I was wrong - the tailstock on the expensive lathe is indeed for the 9"; I think the leadscrew reverse lever was a retrofit.

RussZHC
02-12-2016, 08:35 PM
"Details" ????????

that may include a bunch of stuff, which may or may not be useful, that one has and the other does not. E.G. if one of those details happens to be a taper attachment...not saying for that model but for some models the taper attachment might fetch close to the $800 asking...

flylo
02-13-2016, 01:22 AM
In the "bunch" I bought had the same lathe with a taper attachment which is worth $400 alone, 2-10" Logans & was told by a Logan expert that all 10" Logans have the bed just like a SB heavy 10 which I never knew before. I always liked Logans & now have 3. If I wanted a 9"SB I'd be looking at the $800 soon.

boslab
02-13-2016, 02:51 AM
You get the same vast price differences wherever you are, sometimes your just lucky to get a good one close at a low price, sure there's a ven diagram or two in there, I recently picked up a very good bandsaw for bugger all, the same ones in a different area are fetching 1000, no explanation other than supply and demand
Mark

Carm
02-13-2016, 08:36 AM
That lathe in Allentown is likely gone by now.

Mr-Mike
02-13-2016, 10:33 AM
Interesting stuff. So what I make of it is in addition to sellers' personal premise for their valuations, there are a few pluses in favor of the more expensive machine, however probably not to the extent reflected in the price.

Appreciate you guys taking the time to comment!

oxford
02-13-2016, 10:35 AM
I think for $2700 you can get into a lot better lathe than the Southbend listed above.

Mcgyver
02-13-2016, 11:03 AM
Since when did vendors have a clue? A small percentage make an effort at valuation, of the rest , the clueless, 90% of are high and 10% are low. ignore the 90 and hop in the car when you spot one of the 10

bob308
02-13-2016, 11:15 AM
alright real world time. in December last year I bought a 9"a model with 4 1/2 foot bed. it had 3 and 4 jaw chucks. tool holders tool bits a drill index drill chuck for the tail stock extra belt. price $450 and that was at an auction.

Blue Mule
02-13-2016, 11:34 AM
There's not much price pressure around DC. Hobbyists are apt to be fairly affluent there and don't get exposed to the kinds of prices you see in older industrial areas. Allentown generates lots of surplus tools itself, but it's also close to NJ/NY where prices are lower than average; just look on ebay at what gigigirl111 charges for lathes. Even Lancaster and York have much better bargains, although you really have to watch the "deals" in that area for hidden damage; too many old farmers run lathes into the ground, then use really heavy grease to hide the damage.

Mr-Mike
02-13-2016, 12:30 PM
What irritates me is the lack of information these people provide. Seriously, personally that itself turns me off. No time to jot down a few details, especially if the they have a good piece of gear, why would I take them seriously? Just have to ask themselves 'what would I like know if I was buying', then provide those details. And the photos! One worthwhile shot from a distance at one angle... one of a new chuck or other entirely useless views... If I was selling something, there would be nothing left to the imagination.

The expensive is appealing - says "excellent" and priced as such. The cheaper one is like a safer bet with the chance of being a great deal. I can afford to lose 800 (would be bale to recoup some I know), but blowing 2700 would really piss me off. I don't mind doing a little clean up and lube job but I have no interest in doing a restoration or anything other the the most minor of easy to come by repairs - If I were to go 'used'.

Mr-Mike
02-13-2016, 12:32 PM
There's not much price pressure around DC. Hobbyists are apt to be fairly affluent there and don't get exposed to the kinds of prices you see in older industrial areas. Allentown generates lots of surplus tools itself, but it's also close to NJ/NY where prices are lower than average; just look on ebay at what gigigirl111 charges for lathes. Even Lancaster and York have much better bargains, although you really have to watch the "deals" in that area for hidden damage; too many old farmers run lathes into the ground, then use really heavy grease to hide the damage.

Great points.

mattthemuppet
02-13-2016, 02:34 PM
the difference between the two is that by the time you post about the cheaper one it will be gone, which it is :)