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Jimmer12
02-21-2016, 08:59 AM
I'm thinking of making a set of wood chisels for my future brother in law who is a contractor. I figured it would be something unique rather than the typical wedding gift.

They probably will be mainly ornamental, but I still want to make them fully functional. I'm thinking O1 tool steel, a moderate heat treat, maybe 48 to 52 RC. CNC engrave his name on them, hickory handle, and a P20 tool steel strike plate.

So has anyone ever built a set?

boslab
02-21-2016, 09:21 AM
Socketed chisels are nice, like the reintroduced Stanley sweetheart range, you can replace the handle easily enough
Mark
https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=stanley+sweetheart+chisels&rlz=1C9BKJA_enGB605GB605&oq=stanley+swee&aqs=chrome.2.0j69i57j0l2.5928j0j8&sourceid=chrome-mobile&ie=UTF-8&hl=en-GB#imgrc=aydsC25O-JGQ8M%3A

Black_Moons
02-21-2016, 09:28 AM
I'm thinking of making a set of wood chisels for my future brother in law who is a contractor. I figured it would be something unique rather than the typical wedding gift.

They probably will be mainly ornamental, but I still want to make them fully functional. I'm thinking O1 tool steel, a moderate heat treat, maybe 48 to 52 RC. CNC engrave his name on them, hickory handle, and a P20 tool steel strike plate.

So has anyone ever built a set?

How about something more unique?

Like, corner chisels. Or radius corner chisels, the radius used for <Some common contractor task>. Something he can use in his tool kit.

oldwing
02-21-2016, 09:28 AM
Most contemporary Western chisels aim for an RC of 60-62 or so. Japanese chisels tend to be 62-64. The members of a woodworking club here in MN made a bunch of chisels out of O1 hardened to 60 and the guys love them. They left the sides square like old firmers, they didn't bevel the lands.

BTW, these chisels are simple tangs, bolstered by a washer or whatever and driven into custom handles.

Jimmer12
02-21-2016, 09:43 AM
Most contemporary Western chisels aim for an RC of 60-62 or so. Japanese chisels tend to be 62-64. The members of a woodworking club here in MN made a bunch of chisels out of O1 hardened to 60 and the guys love them. They left the sides square like old firmers, they didn't bevel the lands.

BTW, these chisels are simple tangs, bolstered by a washer or whatever and driven into custom handles.
Ok, most reading I've done suggested the harder steels had a tendency to chip the edge easier. But heat treating to 60 RC is easy enough.

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Jimmer12
02-21-2016, 09:46 AM
How about something more unique?

Like, corner chisels. Or radius corner chisels, the radius used for <Some common contractor task>. Something he can use in his tool kit.
I'll do some poking around and see what he commonly uses.

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Rosco-P
02-21-2016, 12:30 PM
I'm thinking of making a set of wood chisels for my future brother in law who is a contractor. I figured it would be something unique rather than the typical wedding gift.


...and for the wife?

Jimmer12
02-21-2016, 12:45 PM
...and for the wife?
I'll make her a matching set of chisels.

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dave_r
02-21-2016, 01:02 PM
Measure once, chisel twice and it's still too small!

kendall
02-21-2016, 01:51 PM
I'll make her a matching set of chisels.

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Make her a rolling pin that separates into a pair of mallets.

Jimmer12
02-21-2016, 02:35 PM
Make her a rolling pin that separates into a pair of mallets.
Excellent suggestion. Then I will demand fresh made lasagna when I visit...actually rolling pins that become mallets may not be good for my health.

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Paul Alciatore
02-21-2016, 04:01 PM
You are aware that most wedding gifts are for the couple, for the household. Even I know that. If you want to make something, how about SS salt and pepper shakers. Or a set of pots and pans made from "billet". Err, Military Grade billet, that is.

Do the chisels later for his birthday or some other occasion.

Jimmer12
02-21-2016, 04:32 PM
You are aware that most wedding gifts are for the couple, for the household. Even I know that. If you want to make something, how about SS salt and pepper shakers. Or a set of pots and pans made from "billet". Err, Military Grade billet, that is.

Do the chisels later for his birthday or some other occasion.
Meh, my wife can be in charge of figuring out what the hell her sister wants.

Or I'll give these to him at his bachelor party instead.

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Doozer
02-21-2016, 07:29 PM
Don't forget to hollow grind them.
It makes sharpening them on a
stone fast and easy.

-Doozer

Jim Williams
02-21-2016, 08:15 PM
Some time back, I watched Peter Ross forge a socketed chisel. After he finished the socket, he forge welded a piece of steel in place to form the cutting edge. After some file work, stoning, and fitting a handle, he had a nice colonial period wood workers chisel. Peter's forge is near Siler City, NC. He is an authority on colonial period iron work.

Jim

Black_Moons
02-21-2016, 08:27 PM
Ok, most reading I've done suggested the harder steels had a tendency to chip the edge easier. But heat treating to 60 RC is easy enough.

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Yep, that is why they are only used on wood, and most carpenters will beat you should you use them on anything harder.

They are also never to be used for prying, for much the same reason. Screwdrivers are much more suitable (and softer) for that kind of work.

kendall
02-22-2016, 01:30 PM
Excellent suggestion. Then I will demand fresh made lasagna when I visit...actually rolling pins that become mallets may not be good for my health.

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I was thinking more for if he wanted to spend time in the shop with the chisels instead of with her on the wedding night.

Don't laugh, my wife and I spent most of our wedding night in the shop working on projects.

Daveb
02-22-2016, 03:38 PM
I read an article a while ago about wood chisels. The major market for these is DIY, the chisels are made soft so they don't chip.
About 50 years ago I was working in an old building, the job involved stripping out some oak panelling from an office. Behind one of the panels I found a 1 1/2" wood chisel, must have been lost by the man that fitted the panelling 80 years previously. Nice chisel, it would take a razor edge, never could get an edge like that on my plastic handled ones, nor would they hold an edge for long.
Dave

SGW
02-22-2016, 05:47 PM
A while ago I made a coupe of skew chisels with cranked handles for paring things off flush to a surface. I made the chisel from a bar of O-1, tapering the top edges with a 15" tapered end mill. I turned a socket from 1144 rod with about a 2" extension, which I heated up and bent so the handle would end up about 10 degrees above horizontal and maybe an inch or a bit more above the surface being worked on. The end got silver brazed into a hole in the chisel.

This isn't the greatest photo in the world, but it gives the idea. You could do something similar for straight chisels, just don't bend the part that is the socket.

http://i1338.photobucket.com/albums/o686/sasgw/DSC02588_zpsbmryjnqz.jpg (http://s1338.photobucket.com/user/sasgw/media/DSC02588_zpsbmryjnqz.jpg.html)

boslab
02-22-2016, 06:50 PM
A mate of mine does a lot of heavy timber carpentry, a while back he bought a set of all steel chisels, I think they have an octagonal handle like a cold chisel, he thinks they are the best thing since sliced bread, he had me sharpen one that hit a nail in some reclaimed timber, I was quite impressed myself, took a nice edge, and they get hit into oak with a lump hammer!
Worth exploring perhaps, some of my better chisels come from the local cheap supermarket, lidl, very good steel.
Mark