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Mr Fixit
02-27-2016, 08:32 PM
Hello Group,

I have just purchased a Beverly Shear (looks like link below) that I want to build a stand for it so it can be moved around the shop for use and storage. I have a 12"x12"x.50 piece of steel that I plan on using for the base. I plan on welding 1.5" pipe legs on to the plate with a X cross support towards the bottom.
The question that I have is, will the large base plate get in the way trying to use the tool? Can anybody share a stand design they have or would build for the shear.

TX
Mr fixit for the family
Chris :)

https://www.google.com/search?q=beverly+shear+b2&rlz=1Y3KTZR_enUS555US555&prmd=sivn&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi__db-ppnLAhUL1mMKHd3PDo8Q_AUICCgC&biw=1280&bih=800&dpr=2#imgrc=L4u7OFX_anqqNM%3A

ligito
02-27-2016, 08:38 PM
I have an old pipe vise that I bought years ago.
It has a top plate with pipe unions welded on an angle, to the bottom of the plate
and just uses lengths of 3/4 pipe for legs.
The legs unscrew when not needed.

Doozer
02-27-2016, 08:44 PM
Splayed legs are most stable.

-Doozer

PeteM
02-27-2016, 09:10 PM
I just store mine at the back corner of a work bench, then c-clamp it to the front when needed. Even better, could have a couple through holes for bolts. Point being, if you aren't using it frequently and want it out of the way much of the time -- no need to build a stand.

Mr Fixit
02-27-2016, 09:23 PM
Thanks for the suggestions. The splayed legs was. What I had planned. My bench is wall to wall so working a 3x4 sheet of metal would be difficult. I am just not sure the extra base size might get in the way when cutting. Haven't used one before so I'm wanting to ask so I don't build myself a problem.

TX
Mr fixit for the family
Chris :)

CCWKen
02-27-2016, 11:10 PM
If you're working a 3'x4' sheet of metal you'll want it countersunk into a table. That or it's the wrong tool for the job. You'll be a minimum of 3' from a starting point. There's no way to hold a sheet that large with one hand and cut accurately. (Even with help.)

I have a powered bead roller that allows me to use both hands but on occasion have built makeshift in and out feed tables around it for large panels. The same for the shear. Large panels can be unwieldy for accurate work. I would rethink your plan.