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View Full Version : OT? I HATE Painting



Paul Alciatore
03-10-2016, 03:34 AM
I am painting the garage/shop floor. Nothing fancy, just plain gray, but it will look a lot better than the 40 year old concrete it is covering.

Anyway, I am using a roller. I wrap it in a plastic bag after a first coat so I don't have to clean it. Tie the bag tight and it will stay wet for several days, at least (if the bag has no holes). Then I just toss the roller after the second or final coat, so no washing. Full size rollers are cheap. I'll probably do the same thing with the trim roller.

But that left the tray and roller handle and I have always found them particularly hard to clean. I don't know why it took me so long, 72 years, but I finally turned on the hot water and used the sprayer hose at my laundry sink. Easiest job of cleaning the tray and the roller handle ever. It just melted off, even after drying an hour or so.

Perhaps you all have been using hot water forever, but if you haven't, it works great. Wish I had thought of it years ago.

And yes, I know about disposable liners for the trays, but my local places did not seem to have them. Perhaps they are not "green" enough. Besides, the paint always, magically gets under them anyway.

LKeithR
03-10-2016, 04:20 AM
I HATE Painting

Yup...painting, drywall, wallpaper.....all on my NOT to do list...

pinstripe
03-10-2016, 04:28 AM
The last time I bought house paint (six years ago), it came in a bucket like this

http://www.oxygene.com.au/oxygene/uploads/images/work/_packaging/pack_casestudies/pack7c_easyroll.jpg

The top flips over almost 180 degrees and clips onto the fixed part at the back. The "hinge" is around where the red line is on the lid. The flipped over part becomes the tray, and any excess drips back into the bucket. When you finish, you just flip the lid back over. No tray to clean. I did get a few dried up bits falling into the paint after a few uses, but not too bad.

There is a silicone or rubber seal around the top. I only have a tiny amount of paint left in it. I had a peek recently when I was going through my old paint, and it didn't smell off. I intend to clean it up and use it again when I next paint.

I think they are a promotional item, not sold continuously. When I bought it, it was the same price as buying the same amount of paint in a tin. It was designed by an Australian company, so maybe they only sell them in Australia? I am sure that I saw someone with one at the hardware store a few weeks ago.

I wrap the roller in cling wrap. No holes, and you can wrap it tightly with a few layers. I do normally wash them at the end of each day though.

Black Forest
03-10-2016, 06:08 AM
I use power rollers if any rolling has to be done. I have one with a pump and another with the syringe like handle. No tray and easy clean up when done. And yes as hot of water as your hands can stand is definitely your friend.

I also turned a chunk of Aluminum into an arbor for the rollers to slip on. The arbor goes in a battery powered drill and then gets stuck into a bucket with the bottom cut out. That goes in the sink with me holding the spray nozzle pointed at the roller. The roller gets cleaned in about two minutes. These are long nap rollers and they cost around 10 dollars apiece so I clean them. The drill motor and arbor is not my idea. I saw it on YouTube while looking for a better way to clean paint rollers.

With the syringe type of roller it is no mess no fuss to paint walls very quickly. I always hired people to paint inside the house until I bought the power rollers. I use the Wagner brand and they need a slight modification with the addition of an O-ring to stop them from dripping. Once the O-ring is added they never drip. I contacted Wagner about my fix for the roller head. They told me they would try it and maybe add it to the roller heads.

boslab
03-10-2016, 06:50 AM
I've done my share of painting and found hot, to very hot water turns emulsion paint into stringy rubber a good while back, it's still messy though!
I've been tempted to get an airless spray set for the present project, once all the drywall or plasterboard as they call it over here is on, they look quick, I've even seen a tractor painted with one!, to be honest the finish was very good!
Chances are it will be roller and tray though as I don't have a clue about airless so it might be a magnolia/white elephant.
(Funds might be reapproriated to the shop recluttering)
Mark

rws
03-10-2016, 07:09 AM
I do the same when painting, wrap brushes and rollers in saran wrap, keeps them overnight or a couple days. For the roller pan, I line them with aluminum foil. It gets tossed every day, but cheap. I don't clean roller covers, when the job is done, they are trash.

I too am thinking on an airless sprayer. I have a barn with OSB on the sides, and think a sprayer might get all the nooks ans crannies filled better.

George Seal
03-10-2016, 07:15 AM
I tried all of everyone's suggestions after painting and all of you are full of political talk

did not work for me

forgot to mention I was using oil base enamel

vpt
03-10-2016, 07:36 AM
I tried all of everyone's suggestions after painting and all of you are full of political talk

did not work for me

forgot to mention I was using oil base enamel


Gotta use a petroleum based cleaner for oil based paints. Diesel fuel works well!

firbikrhd1
03-10-2016, 08:17 AM
Drywall finishing, brake jobs and painting are my big dislikes, however painting has become something I don't dread so much. I got a roller that is 18" wide with the required bucket and a lightweight telescoping stick to put it on, a stick with a button that allows telescoping, not the twist lock type. I can put 5 gallons of pain in the bucket and roll until it's done. It's amazing how much faster a longer roller covers territory. Like the OP I cover my roller between coats, but with saran wrap and then refrigerate. I wrap and treat brushes and smaller rollers the same way. I keep a 5 gallon bucket of water handy when I am painting and anything I am done with I toss in the bucket and let soak until the end of the job.
For cleanup, I use a curved scraper for the roller cover, dawn dish washing soap for clean up, a Scotchbrite pad and a stainless steel wire brush for brushes and nooks and crannies on other tools.
Water based paints have gotten so good I seldom use oil base anymore, but I was a long time being converted.

Re: airless sprayers. I bought a good one years ago thinking it would be the easy way to paint. I found it isn't all that easy either. Masking takes more time than cutting in. Those spray shields are OK for rough work but have problems of their own. Paint isn't exactly all liquid and sprayer tips can clog while in use. An in line filter helps but doesn't stop that annoyance. Cleanup isn't really all that easy either if you are at all anal. I clean my hose and the sprayer so it looks close to new when I'm finished and that itself is a chore. Spraying on some surfaces just puts paint on the surface and doesn't force it into the pores of the material like rolling will.
I'm in the process of moving and the sparyer will go up for sale at some point.

kitno455
03-10-2016, 08:20 AM
Paul, line the tray with heavy duty aluminum foil. Throw the lining out when you are done instead of cleaning it. Also, if you are going to be away from the project for a few days, wrap the brushes or roller in plastic wrap, and put them in the freezer. Thaw them out the day before you want to use them. Plastic cling wrap works better than plastic bags- put a piece down on the counter, and try to paint it with the roller- it will roll right up around it :)

allan

Mcgyver
03-10-2016, 08:36 AM
be glad you can still get oil based enamel lol. These are the key tricks imo.....

trays: if water based, rinse out. rarely use a tray for oil as its most trim work, but if you have paper towel the worst of it then let it dry.

brushes & rollers: if using again with same colour, wrap in wax paper and place in the freezer unitl needed.

cleaning brushes & rollers: you have to have a spinner. if water based, obviously use water. if oil I use minimal varsol by poring a small quantity on the brush, work it a bit, then spin it in a garbage pail. repeat until clean.

on natural bristle brushes, cleaning is tough on them....work in a few drops of clean oil after cleaning

ironmonger
03-10-2016, 08:53 AM
<<snip>>
But that left the tray and roller handle and I have always found them particularly hard to clean. I don't know why it took me so long, 72 years, but I finally turned on the hot water and used the sprayer hose at my laundry sink. Easiest job of cleaning the tray and the roller handle ever. It just melted off, even after drying an hour or so.

Perhaps you all have been using hot water forever, but if you haven't, it works great. Wish I had thought of it years ago.
<<snip>>



If you are on a septic system this is definitely not a good idea. Not much better sending it to the sewerage treatment plant. In either case it ultimately ends up as landfill.

Latex paint is still an organic hydrocarbon, it is just emulsified with water. Flushing things down the sewer just puts them out of sight and mind. If it isn't biodegradable you have no business introducing it to the sewage treatment plant.

The responsible thing to do is throw out the dried roller with the land fill bound garbage.

They same applies to unused drugs. They are best incinerated. Your local police station may have a drug disposal service.

Sometimes my inner plumber surfaces... just be responsible with your waste products.

Mark Rand
03-10-2016, 09:21 AM
For floors use an epoxy paint. Just let it set in the paint tray and use the next paint on top of the old one.

Doozer
03-10-2016, 11:00 AM
http://www.spinoutusa.com/images/how-it-works-02.jpg

For latex paint, there is Spin-Out.

-Doozer

lakeside53
03-10-2016, 11:23 AM
I don't buy cheap rollers. I have pro lambs wool rollers, some 15 years old (Water based paints). Plastic wrap can keep them good a for days, but when you are finished.. squeeze out the excess in newspaper or rags, wash them out (NOT in the sink...), then with a garden hose at an angle to the top of the roller spin them. They will get up to 1000 rpm! sim out the excess and are literally dry at the end.... watch the angle of the roller or you will get a a face full. Obviously you need an area to do this in - I use my gravel driveway and wash it all in.

Oil based paint - toss the roller. Costs more in solvent than they are worth.

In addition to the usual stuff, I have and airless sprayer and also use power roller with this.

BTW.. Exterior latex paint has powerful mildicides.. If you are on a septic system, washing brushes and rollers it will kill the activity.

CCWKen
03-10-2016, 11:28 AM
I hope you prepped that 40 year old concrete before you painted it or you'll be painting again next year after you scrape all the flaking paint off. Or chemically strip it. :(

Black_Moons
03-10-2016, 11:44 AM
...
Oil based paint - toss the roller. Costs more in solvent than they are worth.


Yea this is what I do when I get oil based paints.. Buy a cheap brush, deal with picking the bristles outta the paint job and throw it out when done. Cover the brush up in a plastic bag between coats so I only need 1 brush per job.

End up using so much solvent its not worth it to clean, Unless you have a lot of 'old gas' you plan on only starting fires with.

gellfex
03-10-2016, 12:01 PM
cleaning brushes & rollers: you have to have a spinner.

I was introduced to the mechanical brush & roller spinner by a guy I hired to paint for me last year. Amazing. I have a number of apartments I rent and HATE painting! Most of them have big elaborate woodwork too. I've been using a $100 plastic HF HVLP gun that comes with it's own blower for the trim. Actually works pretty well, and is well worth the masking time.

Paul Alciatore
03-10-2016, 02:57 PM
Well, oil based paint is verboten in my house. Gives my wife violent headaches. She once walked into the lobby of a motel where they had recently painted and had one for two days. If I must paint anything with oil based paint, I take it out to the back yard shed where I have a spray painting area set up. But I mostly use latex style paints there too. Everything that can not make that trip gets latex.




Gotta use a petroleum based cleaner for oil based paints. Diesel fuel works well!

Paul Alciatore
03-10-2016, 03:10 PM
Well, the bags are free and they work just fine too. I just tie them around the handle with the handles. I use them on paint brushes too. I have used some brushes for two weeks without any cleaning and then, since I get disposables for most work, I just toss them.

I have to get some extra wide aluminum foil and try that trick on the tray. I line everything in the kitchen with it, so I don't know why I never thought of it for paint trays. I tried one of those shinny plastic trays thinking that the paint wouldn't stick to them: no such luck. Thanks to all for that suggestion.

Got to do the edges today. You know, that 3 to 6 inch vertical piece of concrete that the walls set on. And, of course, the corners. I have a 3" roller where I bent the end at 45 degrees so I can do most of it standing up. I don't think my knee will tolerate much kneeling so I will have to sit on the floor if I can't get it standing. I plan to fasten a brush to a stick for the places where the rollers do not reach, a disposable brush. Trying to think of a clever way to do that so I can change the angle easily.




Paul, line the tray with heavy duty aluminum foil. Throw the lining out when you are done instead of cleaning it. Also, if you are going to be away from the project for a few days, wrap the brushes or roller in plastic wrap, and put them in the freezer. Thaw them out the day before you want to use them. Plastic cling wrap works better than plastic bags- put a piece down on the counter, and try to paint it with the roller- it will roll right up around it :)

allan

lakeside53
03-10-2016, 05:38 PM
Yea this is what I do when I get oil based paints.. Buy a cheap brush, deal with picking the bristles outta the paint job and throw it out when done. Cover the brush up in a plastic bag between coats so I only need 1 brush per job.

End up using so much solvent its not worth it to clean, Unless you have a lot of 'old gas' you plan on only starting fires with.

For brushes I still buy some of the best.... and keep them forever. Hand brushing is an art, and the brush has so much to do with it. There's a light purple colored brush cleaner that is water based. Works like magic - dip it in, wait a few minutes, then wash off the "goo" with water. I use it when I change paint colors in the middle of a job too! You can use it to restore old bushes with hardened paint rammed up in the bristles. Amazing stuff.

PStechPaul
03-10-2016, 06:53 PM
It is possible to clean oil-based paint using hot water with detergent. My father once told my grandfather this "trick", and he recommended "Surf" brand laundry detergent. But Pap-pap was hard of hearing and thought he said "syrup", so he used corn syrup and made a sticky mess!

vpt
03-10-2016, 09:09 PM
Well, oil based paint is verboten in my house. Gives my wife violent headaches. She once walked into the lobby of a motel where they had recently painted and had one for two days. If I must paint anything with oil based paint, I take it out to the back yard shed where I have a spray painting area set up. But I mostly use latex style paints there too. Everything that can not make that trip gets latex.



I like the oil based paints for outdoor stuff like tractors, motors, gates, lathes, mills, and whatnots. Its thick and holds up well.

cameron
03-10-2016, 09:21 PM
It is possible to clean oil-based paint using hot water with detergent. My father once told my grandfather this "trick", and he recommended "Surf" brand laundry detergent. But Pap-pap was hard of hearing and thought he said "syrup", so he used corn syrup and made a sticky mess!

Hot water will ruin a good natural bristle brush. I know, because I've done it.

When you finish brush painting with oil paint, lay the brush flat on newspaper and squeeze the paint out of the bristles with the shaft of a screwdriver. This will reduce the amount of thinner to a fraction of what it would be otherwise.

koda2
03-10-2016, 10:14 PM
I have mentioned this before on this forum but to me it bears repeating. If you are going to do all the prep work to paint the floor, put down a two-part epoxy floor covering. It will be the last time you ever mess with the floor.

I painted my 400 sq ft garage floor with it and I have never regretted it. That was 12 years and a lot of hard use ago. It is the usual gray color although I could have added the white and black speckling to it and some fine grit to keep it from being slippery when wet, but it is just fine the way it is.

It was a h-----uva lot of work to do the prep, including removing all traces of oil and contamination, and acid etching, but it has been worth every bit of the effort and the cost.

Dave A.

Tinkerer
03-11-2016, 12:10 AM
And yes, I know about disposable liners for the trays, but my local places did not seem to have them. Perhaps they are not "green" enough. Besides, the paint always, magically gets under them anyway.

Aluminum Foil is what I use as a paint tray liner.. ;)

Paul Alciatore
03-13-2016, 10:56 AM
Just how does/did it ruin it? With natural and unnatural bristle brushes I usually use solvent, then warm water and detergent. When they no longer give up any paint (pigment) I give them a final rinse and wrap them in a paper towel to dry. The towel preserves the lay of the bristles.




Hot water will ruin a good natural bristle brush. I know, because I've done it.

When you finish brush painting with oil paint, lay the brush flat on newspaper and squeeze the paint out of the bristles with the shaft of a screwdriver. This will reduce the amount of thinner to a fraction of what it would be otherwise.

Paul Alciatore
03-13-2016, 11:00 AM
I heard you. I have done careful prep and the acid wash/etch. I am using a one part epoxy: I hope it lasts as long as I do.

As for the speckles, that is the VERY LAST thing I want in a shop floor. They are designed to hide things and I already spend too much time looking for small dropped parts: SOLID COLOR ONLY, please. And I don't see any need for anti slip.




I have mentioned this before on this forum but to me it bears repeating. If you are going to do all the prep work to paint the floor, put down a two-part epoxy floor covering. It will be the last time you ever mess with the floor.

I painted my 400 sq ft garage floor with it and I have never regretted it. That was 12 years and a lot of hard use ago. It is the usual gray color although I could have added the white and black speckling to it and some fine grit to keep it from being slippery when wet, but it is just fine the way it is.

It was a h-----uva lot of work to do the prep, including removing all traces of oil and contamination, and acid etching, but it has been worth every bit of the effort and the cost.

Dave A.

cameron
03-13-2016, 02:25 PM
Just how does/did it ruin it? With natural and unnatural bristle brushes I usually use solvent, then warm water and detergent. When they no longer give up any paint (pigment) I give them a final rinse and wrap them in a paper towel to dry. The towel preserves the lay of the bristles.

Warm water is fine, though I prefer to have it no more than luke warm.

Hot water can cause natural bristles to swell and splay out. When that happens there is no way to recover the original shape and the resilience of the bristles.

radkins
03-13-2016, 03:03 PM
As for the speckles, that is the VERY LAST thing I want in a shop floor. They are designed to hide things and I already spend too much time looking for small dropped parts: SOLID COLOR ONLY, please

Agree 200%!! The small repair room in my old shop had such a floor covering and it was real pain in the rump to find anything small that was dropped, I had complained many times about those danged speckles and vowed not to make that mistake again!


Of course the solid grey floor in my present shop completely hides the black hole in the concrete that instantly swallows up anything I drop now! :mad:

aribert
03-14-2016, 12:57 PM
As a part time, small time, landlord that buys and renovates the occasional house to turn into a rental; I also refrigerate my brushes and rollers (wrapped in multiple plastic grocery bags) when using water based paints - instead of rinsing when reusing the same paint in the future. I've had brushes and rollers survive in the fridge for up to 3 to 4 months. Helps to squeeze the roller / brush every month or so to redistribute the paint remnant to avoid local dry spots (forgot to do the squeeze recently and a roller cover last used in early Dec had local dried up spots in it when I when to use it a week ago). Some of you mentioned using the freezer - my one time experiment resulted in a freeze dried brush.

Paul Alciatore
03-14-2016, 10:41 PM
It seems that for my entire working career in TV, I was "blessed" with shops with standard floor tiles with the camouflage designs. Almost impossible to find a small electronic part on them. When I absolutely had to, I got on my hands and knees and used a flashlight at a small angle so the shadows were as big as possible.

In a renovation, I once tried to get some solid color floor tile, preferably WHITE. I couldn't find any and I don't think it exists. All commercial floor materials are DESIGNED to hide dirt and anything else you may be looking for.




Agree 200%!! The small repair room in my old shop had such a floor covering and it was real pain in the rump to find anything small that was dropped, I had complained many times about those danged speckles and vowed not to make that mistake again!


Of course the solid grey floor in my present shop completely hides the black hole in the concrete that instantly swallows up anything I drop now! :mad: