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MachineMan384
03-23-2016, 04:54 PM
So as I am looking to get a lathe and operate it in an apartment, I have been doing some searching for solutions, and came across this!

https://books.google.com/books?id=mikDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA124&dq=cupboard+work+bench&hl=pt-PT&ei=5BLsTJXHCsrAhAe_5f3NDA&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result#v=onepage&q&f=false

Seems like a great way to contain swarf and keep it from getting around. But what I find really cool is that he uses it for sawdust control. That means maybe I could do woodworking in the apartment and contain the dust.

I will need to figure out how to build it though...:D

Carm
03-23-2016, 05:04 PM
Cautionary note.
Wood dust has flammability hazards. Metal working can generate sparks.
Never the twain shall meet.

MachineMan384
03-23-2016, 05:04 PM
Maybe I could build it out of T-slots and place it behind the workbench, something similar to this in design:

http://www.minitecframing.com/application_pages/workstations/images/Sliding%20Eyelet_jpg.jpg

J Tiers
03-23-2016, 05:58 PM
Swarf will always get through.... it's the nature of the beast. I have yet to see a system that is foolproof. Some are pretty decent, but definitely not 100%.

Apartments and power tools mix best if you are on the lowest living floor.

MachineMan384
03-23-2016, 06:05 PM
Cautionary note.
Wood dust has flammability hazards. Metal working can generate sparks.
Never the twain shall meet.

Good point. I suppose I could build a separate enclosure for woodworking. I would only be woodworking with hand tools anyhow, not machines.

MachineMan384
03-23-2016, 06:06 PM
Swarf will always get through.... it's the nature of the beast. I have yet to see a system that is foolproof. Some are pretty decent, but definitely not 100%.

Apartments and power tools mix best if you are on the lowest living floor.

True, but if the setup can greatly reduce the amount that gets through, that is a good thing. Also yes I am on the lowest floor.

kendall
03-23-2016, 07:51 PM
an old blanket or scrap carpet on the floor will help keep the swarf from spreading around, better than board or rubber mat as they generally trap swarf.

fixerdave
03-24-2016, 02:38 AM
If you're set on running a lathe in your bedroom, I recommend you:

* Buy your own smallish vacuum to use at the bench, a lot. Don't wreck your house vacuum.
* Put something on the floor to protect it, as Kendall suggests. Something you can roll up when done, because you'll never get all the swarf out of it.
* Get some old shoes (closed top) that you can leave at the lathe. No bare feet, and you don't want to track stuff around the house.
* Get a fan that can blow the air OUT the window, because hot oil burns and that smells. Even if you avoid cutting fluid, metal is often oily.

I would not recommend a plastic enclosure because the main reason for that is dust, and lathes don't generally make dust that floats around in the air. Metal is heavy. The enclosure will just get in the way and make everything frustrating.

And now, because you've asked all kinds of questions and I don't want you to get discouraged, I'm going to make a whole bunch of assumptions and then give you advice that a whole bunch of people will disagree with... such is the internet.

Turing your bedroom into a shop is not ideal, but if that's what you've got then you can make it work.

A lathe is an awesome thing to have, but it doesn't stand entirely on its own. To set up a shop, you will need to buy, at a minimum:

* A hacksaw to cut metal down to length so you can put it in the lathe.
* Some kind of vice to clamp said metal in while cutting it. A folding workmate might be particularly useful to you.
* A smallish bench grinder, so you can shape tool bits for your lathe, get a fine stone on one side and a wire wheel on the other.
* Some files, and your first lathe project can be making handles for said files.
* Center drills (very short drill bits designed to make holes for the centers that come with your lathe)
* Some HSS tool blanks for the lathe.
* Consider getting a small, cheap, 8" drillpress and drillbits.
* Eye protection.
* (edit) A cheap digital caliper. Accurate enough to start with and being able to zero it at any point make a lot of things easier.

If at all possible, try to figure out how to clamp the grinder on the workmate OUTSIDE the apartment, running an extension cord for power. You will need to grind but you don't want to be doing that inside: Smoky, messy, fire hazard, noisy. That's an outside or real shop thing. But, a grinder, with a wire wheel, makes so many things so much easier.

With the above, and some time to learn how to use them, you will be the go-to guy for the robotics crowd and everyone else that wants to make stuff. At first, you just sort of stare at a lathe and wonder what to do. Once you get used to having one around, and realize just how much it can do, and the freedom it give you to turn ideas into reality, well, a shop just isn't complete without it. That said, you'll probably use the drillpress and bench grinder more.

I wrote this a long time ago... you might find it useful: The Mistakes I've Made (http://fixerdave.blogspot.ca/2007/01/mistakes-ive-made.html)

David...

P.S. Buy a GOOD hacksaw. There's a lot of things you can cheap out on when setting up a shop, but a decent hacksaw is not that expensive and works so much better than a cheap one. You'll appreciate a good hacksaw when working through an inch of steel rod; a cheap hacksaw will drive you nuts.

MachineMan384
03-24-2016, 08:34 AM
If you're set on running a lathe in your bedroom, I recommend you:

* Buy your own smallish vacuum to use at the bench, a lot. Don't wreck your house vacuum.
* Put something on the floor to protect it, as Kendall suggests. Something you can roll up when done, because you'll never get all the swarf out of it.
* Get some old shoes (closed top) that you can leave at the lathe. No bare feet, and you don't want to track stuff around the house.
* Get a fan that can blow the air OUT the window, because hot oil burns and that smells. Even if you avoid cutting fluid, metal is often oily.

I would not recommend a plastic enclosure because the main reason for that is dust, and lathes don't generally make dust that floats around in the air. Metal is heavy. The enclosure will just get in the way and make everything frustrating.

And now, because you've asked all kinds of questions and I don't want you to get discouraged, I'm going to make a whole bunch of assumptions and then give you advice that a whole bunch of people will disagree with... such is the internet.

Turing your bedroom into a shop is not ideal, but if that's what you've got then you can make it work.

A lathe is an awesome thing to have, but it doesn't stand entirely on its own. To set up a shop, you will need to buy, at a minimum:

* A hacksaw to cut metal down to length so you can put it in the lathe.
* Some kind of vice to clamp said metal in while cutting it. A folding workmate might be particularly useful to you.
* A smallish bench grinder, so you can shape tool bits for your lathe, get a fine stone on one side and a wire wheel on the other.
* Some files, and your first lathe project can be making handles for said files.
* Center drills (very short drill bits designed to make holes for the centers that come with your lathe)
* Some HSS tool blanks for the lathe.
* Consider getting a small, cheap, 8" drillpress and drillbits.
* Eye protection.
* (edit) A cheap digital caliper. Accurate enough to start with and being able to zero it at any point make a lot of things easier.

If at all possible, try to figure out how to clamp the grinder on the workmate OUTSIDE the apartment, running an extension cord for power. You will need to grind but you don't want to be doing that inside: Smoky, messy, fire hazard, noisy. That's an outside or real shop thing. But, a grinder, with a wire wheel, makes so many things so much easier.

With the above, and some time to learn how to use them, you will be the go-to guy for the robotics crowd and everyone else that wants to make stuff. At first, you just sort of stare at a lathe and wonder what to do. Once you get used to having one around, and realize just how much it can do, and the freedom it give you to turn ideas into reality, well, a shop just isn't complete without it. That said, you'll probably use the drillpress and bench grinder more.

I wrote this a long time ago... you might find it useful: The Mistakes I've Made (http://fixerdave.blogspot.ca/2007/01/mistakes-ive-made.html)

David...

P.S. Buy a GOOD hacksaw. There's a lot of things you can cheap out on when setting up a shop, but a decent hacksaw is not that expensive and works so much better than a cheap one. You'll appreciate a good hacksaw when working through an inch of steel rod; a cheap hacksaw will drive you nuts.

Thanks for all that information, I appreciate it. The grinder I could probably set up to run outside when needed. For the plastic enclosure, the idea there is to primarily contain the swarf within a specific area, so it doesn't fly around the room. I have been thinking that I might see about building such an enclosure where it encompasses my whole body as opposed to just the machine like in the picture, so basically I would be inside the enclosure and that way it wouldn't get in the way.

I do intend to get a milling machine to go with the lathe, but that will be further down the line.

Paul Alciatore
03-24-2016, 09:36 AM
Good luck.

Let us know how it works out.

flylo
03-24-2016, 11:01 AM
Neat old articles, it had my 1st mini bike a "Wren", my 1st truck a '66 Chevey & I'm glad Gus is OK:cool:

fixerdave
03-24-2016, 02:44 PM
Neat old articles, it had my 1st mini bike a "Wren", my 1st truck a '66 Chevey & I'm glad Gus is OK:cool:

Yeah, I blew an hour reading that magazine too. It was fun.

David...