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chrisinestes
03-23-2016, 06:20 PM
I thought I'd take advantage of Enco's 15% off and free shipping deal that ends tomorrow. I've got some heavy stuff in the cart, and free shipping sure helps.

I've got a Phase II BXA Set, with #1, #2, #4, #7, & #10 holders, and 5/8" insert holders. When I bought the set, I just guessed at some carbide inserts to get. I'd like some advice on ordering some more inserts.

I know I need triangle shaped inserts with a center hole. That's about all I know... Any advice for me for the top, say, 20 inserts I should have?

I know how I sound... Haha... I see questions like this from beginners asking what router bits they should have for their CNC router, and I've been around that enough to know just what works for what... but not for my metal lathe.

Oh yeah... How about an entry level boring bar/set for my BXA 3/4" / 1" holder... Any advice on that?

Thanks!
Chris

Yondering
03-23-2016, 06:39 PM
Your inserts will be specific to the holders you bought. Did you get the cheap 5-piece holder set that Enco and Grizzly sell? Those take "TT" style inserts, and you have to match the size to your holders.

RussZHC
03-23-2016, 06:58 PM
5/8" insert holders

which ones did you get?
Best I can figure, Phase II sells the tool post, w "holders" style specified in the catalog but not including the actual tooling.
If you have them in hand (or even the catalog page w a part #) there should be a alpha-numeric code on the insert holders, as Yondering said, what inserts will be specific to the holders IF you got all the same style, if not, you will end up with more than one style of insert being needed, not a bad thing but adds to the stock on hand that is needed longer term.

I am partial to the old school Everede boring bars, depends on how much you want to spend if you want an insert style bar.
IF you don't mind searching EBay and perhaps waiting a bit, Ultradex are nice and not too, too expensive, Walter makes some nice stuff...quite a few actually both import and US made ("import" being anything made outside of the US in this case). Size and carbide costs money, the bar itself, not just the inserts.
You end up getting a range of bar diameters since, for best results you want to use a bar close to the hole size, if possible. So it often happens you buy one bar at a time, as need arises.
I'd start with an Ultradex bar with med size CCMT inserts, they are relative easy to find, lots of variety coating wise and nose radius wise, have multiple sides to use, be sure you get bar and insert sizes matched to one another.

JoeLee
03-23-2016, 11:00 PM
Make sure you get inserts that are dead sharp !!!!! Honed edge inserts will give you terrible finishes.

JL..............

Carm
03-24-2016, 07:31 AM
What fer lathe do you have? Negative inserts are better suited to multi HP.
Dead sharp will allow tiny DOC that the positive or negative w/hone won't. You can sneak up.
The trade off, dead sharp is delicate in comparison and won't give the mileage.

Doozer
03-24-2016, 08:05 AM
It is nice to have a negative rake insert with a chip breaker groove
that makes the insert positive with respect to it's presentation to
the workpiece. You get more cutting edges to use up and the free
cutting action.

-Doozer

wierdscience
03-24-2016, 09:13 AM
Boring bars in the lathe I like ones that use a CCMT 22.51 and 32.51 insert.The ones I bought were Toolmex (Bison) brand and have served me well for years.They can also use CCGT series inserts for machining Aluminum.

That said I would not buy inserts from Enco,because you will end up paying too much even with the sale.I get most of my inserts off Ebay these days.I just bought ten new Kyocera CCGT 32.51 inserts for $19 including shipping.

Jaakko Fagerlund
03-24-2016, 12:41 PM
If you want suggestions for inserts/holders, here's my quick list:
-WNMG for roughing and general pupose metal removal, gives 6 edges per insert and 2 directions to turn
-SNMG for chamgering, 8 edges per insert, 2 directions
-DNMG in different radii, 4 edges per insert, works in boring bars too
-DCMT for mid-size boring bars
-CCMT for smaller boring bars, 2 edges per insert
-DNGA for hard turning

If only something of those, then DNMG and SNMG.

smithdoor
03-24-2016, 12:53 PM
I have found the triangle work in a shop I have big box of inserts I never use today and only use triangle's few carbide tool bits and HSS. When had shop with machinist working for me I found they wood go though inserts faster water so back the good old tool bits and save money.

Good luck
Dave


I thought I'd take advantage of Enco's 15% off and free shipping deal that ends tomorrow. I've got some heavy stuff in the cart, and free shipping sure helps.

I've got a Phase II BXA Set, with #1, #2, #4, #7, & #10 holders, and 5/8" insert holders. When I bought the set, I just guessed at some carbide inserts to get. I'd like some advice on ordering some more inserts.

I know I need triangle shaped inserts with a center hole. That's about all I know... Any advice for me for the top, say, 20 inserts I should have?

I know how I sound... Haha... I see questions like this from beginners asking what router bits they should have for their CNC router, and I've been around that enough to know just what works for what... but not for my metal lathe.

Oh yeah... How about an entry level boring bar/set for my BXA 3/4" / 1" holder... Any advice on that?

Thanks!
Chris

Carm
03-24-2016, 03:01 PM
If you want suggestions for inserts/holders, here's my quick list:
-WNMG for roughing and general pupose metal removal, gives 6 edges per insert and 2 directions to turn
-SNMG for chamgering, 8 edges per insert, 2 directions
-DNMG in different radii, 4 edges per insert, works in boring bars too
-DCMT for mid-size boring bars
-CCMT for smaller boring bars, 2 edges per insert
-DNGA for hard turning

If only something of those, then DNMG and SNMG.

Jaakko, do you use any button tools?

Yondering
03-24-2016, 07:13 PM
If you want suggestions for inserts/holders, here's my quick list:
-WNMG for roughing and general pupose metal removal, gives 6 edges per insert and 2 directions to turn
-SNMG for chamgering, 8 edges per insert, 2 directions
-DNMG in different radii, 4 edges per insert, works in boring bars too
-DCMT for mid-size boring bars
-CCMT for smaller boring bars, 2 edges per insert
-DNGA for hard turning

If only something of those, then DNMG and SNMG.

Thanks for the recommendations.

Do you (or anyone else) have recommendations for specific tool holders for these for hsm sized machines? Like 1/2" or 5/8" max tool holder size? Most of the holders I find seem to be for larger machines, and of course are fairly expensive too. I bought some TNMG inserts recently thinking I could adapt them to my 1/2" holders, but no go, they need their own dedicated holder (obvious now that I have them in hand).

Given the cost and size of most of the commercial tool holders I've found, I was thinking of just machining my own holders. Do you guys do this too?

rohart
03-24-2016, 07:42 PM
Yes.

Mr Fixit
03-24-2016, 09:49 PM
Just saw this link on a nother post.http://www.carbidedepot.com/formulas-insert-d.htm seems like a good chart to help with your questions. I don't have insert tooling so I'm just posting because it seems helpful.

TX
Mr fixit for the family
Chris :)

Mr Fixit
03-24-2016, 09:51 PM
Finger stuttered. Duplicate post.

PStechPaul
03-24-2016, 11:57 PM
I'm reasonably happy with the set of 5 3/8" insert holders from Enco for my lathe:




Model No.
Description
Qty.
Price
Tax
Ext. Price



NC250-1400
WITH 3/8" SHANK INDEXABLE HOLDER 5 PC SET
1
16.49

$16.49




And the inserts seem good:




NC340-1204
TT222 TCN55 CARBIDE TURNING INSERT
10
2.41

$24.10



http://enginuitysystems.com/pix/tools/Lathe_Index_Carbide_2738.jpg

http://enginuitysystems.com/pix/tools/Lathe_Index_Carbide_2739.jpg

And with the QCTP:

http://enginuitysystems.com/pix/tools/Lathe_QCTP_Turning_2793.jpg

http://enginuitysystems.com/pix/tools/Lathe_QCTP_Turning_2795.jpg

Jaakko Fagerlund
03-25-2016, 06:46 AM
Jaakko, do you use any button tools?
Oh shoot, forgot round cutters completely! Yeah, I've got one holder that takes different cut-off insert style pieces with varying diameters up to 3 mm radius, and then separatte holders for R4, R5, R6, R8, R10. I'm not sure of the code for those as I order them so infrequently as they just last and last, but can check later on.

As for getting small holders for these tools, I think the smallest I've seen is DNMG 1103 size which fits to a 16 mm holder (or was it 12 mm holder, can't remember). Anyway, I do remember that I just milled the underside of my holders to get them to fit my lathe center height and QC holder.

Arcane
03-25-2016, 08:48 AM
........Given the cost and size of most of the commercial tool holders I've found, I was thinking of just machining my own holders. Do you guys do this too?

Yes, I also make my own tool holders for carbide inserts. Most of the ones I've made have been made from 1/2" key stock and I've made a few for a friend too. I did buy a "Diamond Tool Holder" years ago soon after I acquired my 9" SB and love it. It's my main tool holder and since it uses 1/4" HSS lathe tool bits it's very economical. I just use the carbide for harder material that HSS isn't suitable for.

chrisinestes
03-25-2016, 03:07 PM
Well, the ONE 20 mile long fiber optic cable running to my little Mtn. town was damaged due to a snow storm, and I lost Internet, Cell, and land-line phone for nearly 2 days, so this has ended up being a hurry-up-and-wait deal...

I'll read through all the posts, and try to answer the questions asked of me.


The lathe is a 1993 Enco 110-1340 13" x 40" with a 2HP 220V motor.

I have the import holder 5-piece set # 250-1402. Are they OK, or are they crap?

The few inserts I have are Interstate brand TT type. I have 2 each of TT321 TCN55 (Enco # 78639176), TT322 TCN55 (Enco #78639218) , & TT323 I55 (Enco #78639242). I found a chart that gives me more info than I can understand, but at least I know the cutting radius of them. It's a start! What are those best suited for? What do I look at for brass, aluminum, and cast iron?

How do I find out if the inserts are honed, or sharp? I can see where the sharp inserts would be more delicate.

Is the Rake the same as Relief Angle?

Is there such an insert with a bit of a flat spot instead of a radius?

The Carbide Depot link helps! I'll check out the boring bar suggestions, too.

Thanks for helping this newbie!

Chris

danlb
03-25-2016, 04:12 PM
I used a similar set of tool holders for years. They should be serviceable for general use. You have a a fair amount of HP, so you can use inserts that are sharp (more expensive and fragile) or those that are molded. Those of us with less than a HP tend to need the honed inserts.

The rake is on top of the insert and determines how it breaks the chips off. The clearance is the slant of the front and side edges that keeps the sides of the insert (and tool holder) from rubbing.

Brass wants an insert with no rake. Aluminum likes a bit of rake.

A flat spot on the front can be added with a diamond wheel on a grinder, but not generally desirable.

It helped me to watch some MIT videos that showed where the cutting edge is and what it does when turning. With normal turning from right to left, the left edge of the nose is doing most of the cutting.

The different shapes of inserts are to give you a choice of the number of cutting edges as well as different angles for plunging and durability. The wider the angle, the more durable. The triangular shape is a good compromise shape that gives 3 cutting edges (6 in some configurations) and it's 60 degree tip is sturdy enough for most uses. It can also be used for threading.

Dan

PStechPaul
03-25-2016, 06:17 PM
I tried using my carbide insert tool for threading 1/4"-20, and the 1/32" tip radius was too large. 1/64" might have been OK, but probably not for smaller threads.

KEJR
03-25-2016, 07:17 PM
I've gotten to the point where it's just simpler to buy the brazed carbide tools made in USA. Diamond wheels are cheap these days.

The inserts have poor rake... often zero... unless you buy the expensive uber sharp ones and don't use a holder with negative rake builtin. Some guys will say that the chip breaker makes the rake positive but only if you take a cut deep enough to get past the flat edge and into the chip breaker.

I think to use inserts properly you need a lot of different types and different holders and often have to buy the better carbide in 10pc lots. By the time you get done figuring all this out and dishing out the cash you could've bought a diamond wheel and some diamond hones and nice brazed tooling. Just my opinion. I do like carbide better than hss because it can take faster speed.

danlb
03-25-2016, 11:56 PM
I've gotten to the point where it's just simpler to buy the brazed carbide tools made in USA. Diamond wheels are cheap these days.

The inserts have poor rake... often zero... unless you buy the expensive uber sharp ones and don't use a holder with negative rake builtin. Some guys will say that the chip breaker makes the rake positive but only if you take a cut deep enough to get past the flat edge and into the chip breaker.

I think to use inserts properly you need a lot of different types and different holders and often have to buy the better carbide in 10pc lots. By the time you get done figuring all this out and dishing out the cash you could've bought a diamond wheel and some diamond hones and nice brazed tooling. Just my opinion.

That's an interesting point of view. I found it fairly easy to find an indexable tool set that used the same insert for all of them. Then it was a matter of buying the inerts that I wanted to aluminum, steel and for interrupted cuts. As a home shop, a $3 insert will not break the bank if I get a month or more use out of it.

When you say "inserts have poor rake... often zero..." you make it sound like you don't have a choice. The rake is easily controlled by using the right holder or by buying the "high rake" inserts or the inserts with chipbreakers.

BTW, I do have 15 or 20 tool holders, but that's because I have them set up for various tasks. I generally use CC inserts and TT inserts (diamond shape and triangle) though I do have a few special ones. :)


Dan

JRouche
03-26-2016, 02:14 AM
I thought I'd take advantage of Enco's 15% off and free shipping deal that ends tomorrow....

I've got a Phase II BXA Set, with #1, #2, #4, #7, & #10 holders, and 5/8" insert holders. ->>> I'd like some advice on ordering some more inserts.
Oh yeah... How about an entry level boring bar/set for my BXA 3/4" / 1" holder... Any advice on that?

Thanks!
Chris

I like the BXA tool post, even for my two light 10" lathes. I use 1/2" bit holders. I have thousands of new in box. Carbide, PCD, ceramic and CBN bits. And all the tool bars to hold them.

Turning bars and internal (boring) bars. You really need the proper bar to support the designed Bit. Otherwise braze it like some other folks said..

FYI I have not used any of Enco's carbide "stuff".

JR

Jaakko Fagerlund
03-26-2016, 05:27 AM
The inserts have poor rake... often zero... unless you buy the expensive uber sharp ones and don't use a holder with negative rake builtin. Some guys will say that the chip breaker makes the rake positive but only if you take a cut deep enough to get past the flat edge and into the chip breaker.
The ones you would want then are meant for finish cutting, as they are are sharper and have more positive cutting action.

RussZHC
03-26-2016, 11:02 AM
What do I look at for brass, aluminum, and cast iron?

IMO, if you are going down the road of using carbide inserts, spend some time looking through manufacturers catalogs...Kennametal, Sandvik, Mitsubishi, Iscar etc. and while you maybe overwhelmed at first, the education you will get is most helpful.
Even if you never purchase from any of them, you will develop a feel (approximation?) of what is most likely to work for a specific need. Speeds, feeds, recommended coatings.
The basic "coding" of the inserts is not overly complex esp as when the holders are "known" it eliminates 95% of what is out there (if not more).

KEJR
03-26-2016, 05:58 PM
That's an interesting point of view. I found it fairly easy to find an indexable tool set that used the same insert for all of them. Then it was a matter of buying the inerts that I wanted to aluminum, steel and for interrupted cuts. As a home shop, a $3 insert will not break the bank if I get a month or more use out of it.

When you say "inserts have poor rake... often zero..." you make it sound like you don't have a choice. The rake is easily controlled by using the right holder or by buying the "high rake" inserts or the inserts with chipbreakers.

BTW, I do have 15 or 20 tool holders, but that's because I have them set up for various tasks. I generally use CC inserts and TT inserts (diamond shape and triangle) though I do have a few special ones. :)


Dan
I wish I could find that sweet spot with inserts. The two holders I bought use triangle hole inserts that are probably oversized for my machine. The milling face cutters i was given use square flat inserts. The massive lathe tool I was given has negative rake and used a fat diamond like insert (cnmg i think). None of these are $3 for any usa brands even on eBay... at last when I look for them. Then there are the different purpose radii, finishes, chip breakers, and grades..... ahhhhh!

No offense to anyone this is just my own opinion. Id rather stock up on one universal high quality grade of carbide that can be used and re-sharpened.

KEJR
03-26-2016, 06:14 PM
One more thing for Dan lb.... I think you have a great point about getting a set that uses the same insert. This is a big part of my frustration I.e. having all sorts off inserts. I can't seem to find anything that spans turning boring and milling/facing. Is this just asking too much or can it be done with. ... say. ...a small triangle insert.... even if it's not the best pick for the larger boring and milling jobs? I think that was one of the things that killed the insert route for me.

I know grizzly and enco have sets that can do turning (maybe some do boring? ) and while this is tempting I've never tried them because guys on the forums shot then down so hard.

Any ideas for the op and others reading this for a decent set of insert tools using one type of insert?

RussZHC
03-26-2016, 06:40 PM
others reading this for a decent set of insert tools using one type of insert?


CCxx

Dorian, Ultradex, Micro 100, Everede...as far as I know those are all made in USA (if that is important to you) all have tool holders for turning/facing, all have boring bars using those same inserts (did not look at all details but know they go from very small to quite large and everything from steel, carbide and "heavy metal").
PLUS it means you would be able to get something like a CCGT insert which quite a few use for aluminum as it can be found "sharp" with good angles.

I bought a set of the Micro 100 years ago as it was "cheap" and made use of all corners (the shape is an 80* diamond). They, CCxx, do well on lower horsepower machines...the screw hold down may not be the most secure or current but it does work pretty well.

Sandvik quality inserts in pretty good grades can be found for $5 per insert or less on EBay, much less if you wait a bit (and use various search profiles) and there are most often lots to choose from (now they are not all the same size and tool holders are included but at this moment there are 3400 plus or minus hits on EBay). IF you can go to the 32.xx size, the inserts get a bit cheaper yet (mine are 21.xx)

DR
03-26-2016, 10:20 PM
Three CNC lathes.....plus a manual prior to semi-retirement. All four lathes use the same basic tooling.

CCMT, 21.xx, and 31.xx 80 degree diamond. They turn and face with the same tool setting, this is very important consideration for efficiency. CCMT are readily available, probably the most popular insert these days. Boring bars from 3/8" to 1" shank that use the same 80 degree style inserts. Everything in grades from ceramic to razor sharp high positive for soft materials.

A few special inserts for certain jobs like 35 and 55 degree diamonds. Again, these interchanged between all machines.

Just my opinion based on my circumstances, but no triangle inserts. The main reason would be they can't both turn and face.

No button inserts either, I don't see the point in turning. We did use full nose radius grooving inserts up to 1/8" wide for profiling like turning a ball where the insert alternates the side it's cutting on.


All the above applies to lathes. Milling inserts are another issue, I don't recall any that interchanged between lathe and mills.

danlb
03-27-2016, 11:48 AM
Here's an example of the two. Both contain the basic tools of of the following styles; AR - right hand, AL - left hand, BL - left hand 15 angle, BR - right hand 15 angle, style E - threading tool 30 angle

I pulled the examples from shars.com because it was convenient. The first is a nice complete set in 1/2 inch shank. It's $85. It uses 5 different types of inserts for 7 tools. From http://www.shars.com/1-2-indexable-carbide-turning-tool-set-1

Inserts = CCMT, CK3, DCMT, ER, WCMX

http://www.shars.com/files/products/404-1054/404-1054sketch.jpg



On the other hand, there is one that uses just triangular inserts to do the same job. $45. It does not have a grooving/parting tool. From http://www.shars.com/1-2-indexable-carbide-turning-tool-set

Inserts = TCMT

http://i.imgur.com/mgQjh8j.jpg

In some cases, it makes good sense to use specialized shapes. For instance, an ER insert can be purchased that cuts a perfect thread in only one size. You can turn an identical thread with a triangular insert but it takes a bit more skill and understanding of the thread profile. Grooves are another area where you may want a special insert or tool. Fortunately, it's easy to grind HSS tool bits to handle those special grooves.


Dan

chrisinestes
03-27-2016, 03:52 PM
I sure have lots of learning to do... I've got bone spur removal surgery coming this Thursday... Dr. says stay off my foot for at least 4 days... That'll give me lots of reading time.

I'm using carbide inserts as somewhat of a crutch since I have no way to do any tool sharpening. I guess I need to get a sharpening system figured out, too.

Chris

RussZHC
03-27-2016, 04:15 PM
I'm using carbide inserts as somewhat of a crutch since I have no way to do any tool sharpening

nothing wrong with using carbide inserts...to me one of the upsides of HSS is that you can grind near any sort of "specialty" end and more than likely it will get the job done.
I make the most use out of 3/8" square HSS but also have 3/16", 1/4" and 1/2" which is the max capacity of the tool holders I got with the tool post. Having all those sizes was deliberate on my part as you find out pretty quick it is considerably less grinding if you want to make a small groove say and you have a 3/16" tool bit rather than just 1/2" ones.
I could not live without 2 or 3 bench grinders and sharpening HSS really is that simple...takes some time to learn but set-up can be pretty basic.
There are a few in your "neighborhood" for $50 or less, don't need that 18" one in Washington Park and there is one for $ 15 in Parker that with a little work would do fine. That's off of Craigs, bench grinders are easy, even in tool deserts.

I actually use HSS less and less as the inserts are not that expensive, work very well, are more consistent with less time spent (IMO).

KEJR
03-30-2016, 09:42 PM
What do you guys think of this style insert holder? I've noticed ccmt inserts in boring bar holders as well. In the larger bars they are the next size up but that's understandable. Would this be a good option for low horsepower lathes since they aren't pitched negative? They have a left hand version as well.

KEJR
03-30-2016, 09:43 PM
http://www.shars.com/products/indexable-cutting/turning-toolholders/3-8-rh-sclc-small-screw-lock-positive-insert-tool-holder

Sorry almost forgot the link!

danlb
03-30-2016, 11:09 PM
http://www.shars.com/products/indexable-cutting/turning-toolholders/3-8-rh-sclc-small-screw-lock-positive-insert-tool-holder

Sorry almost forgot the link!

I have one of those in the kit I bought (as shown in Post #30) for my 9x20. The QCTP will take up to 1/2 inch. so I picked up the 1/2 inch version. I had previously picked up a 3/8 inch chank model for my 7x12.

It turns well from right to left. Without changing the position I can also use it for facing.

The down side is that the head of the tool is rather big, so it will not work for areas where the groove is less than 1/2 inch.

Dan

sawlog
03-31-2016, 08:59 AM
I am partial to the inserts that are the ones everybody disagrees with for small lathe use. My favorite is a CNMG 432 however I search around for tool holders on e-bay or buy import holder that I can put high quality inserts in. Then I just machine the toolholder with a dovetail to fit my BXA holder. I figure the import or used holder is less expensive than machining insert pockets The cutting of the dovetail and making a simple adjusting screw isn't that bad

chrisinestes
03-31-2016, 12:56 PM
I'm still trying to figure out what'd be best for my beginnerness. I've messed around some with the cheap ENCO insert holder set & inserts I got, and I've made some chips.

Here's a new problem I've run into. The screws that hold the inserts into the holders are absolute crap. They're supposed to be sized for a 2mm allen wrench, but the wrench barely catches, and strips the screw heads before it's tight. ENCO has discontinued those screws, and doesn't have any screws available that'll work. That makes my inserts & holders useless for now.

Maybe that's a blessing, and I can get a better grade of insert holder that'll take more varied inserts.

I'm headed for foot surgery in about 2 hours... I should have 3-4 days of resting where I can hopefully get holders and inserts figured out. I'm basically shut down with the lathe till I get some better tools ordered in.

Thanks!
Chris

pinstripe
03-31-2016, 02:07 PM
Here's a new problem I've run into. The screws that hold the inserts into the holders are absolute crap. They're supposed to be sized for a 2mm allen wrench, but the wrench barely catches, and strips the screw heads before it's tight.

Are you sure they are hex heads? Mine are Torx. The key is normally included with the holder.

Joel
03-31-2016, 04:13 PM
Here's a new problem I've run into. The screws that hold the inserts into the holders are absolute crap. They're supposed to be sized for a 2mm allen wrench, but the wrench barely catches, and strips the screw heads before it's tight. ENCO has discontinued those screws, and doesn't have any screws available that'll work.

When I run into poorly fitting hex heads and replacing them is inconvenient for some reason, I take the next size up Allen (3/32" in this case), and file a slight taper on each of the six sides. It is fast and easy to make a very tightly fitting wrench. If you make such a wrench and tap it into your screw heads with a hammer, you will probably be able to bring them back to usable. This has even worked for me on damaged Torx heads, which insert screws often are, as pinstripe mentioned.

PStechPaul
03-31-2016, 06:38 PM
I did have some trouble with the screws on my Enco toolholders. IIRC they did not come with a wrench, or if so, it didn't fit very well. I may have used some other hex wrench I had on hand. One screw was especially crappy, but I finally got it to work OK. I figure I can get other screws to fit, or maybe drill and tap for a larger size. The Shars set shown in a previous post looks pretty good and reasonable price.

[edit] I just checked the Enco website and the import sets seem to be all back-ordered. And the M2.2 SHCS with 2mm hex drive are $2.78 each! And also back-ordered. They are less than $0.15 each from McMaster, but they seem to have only M2x0.4 and M2.5x0.45. The M2.5 has a 2mm hex socket.
http://www.mcmaster.com/#socket-head-cap-screws/=11s7xsb

http://www.mcmaster.com/mva/library/20140203/91290a102l.gif

sawlog
03-31-2016, 09:05 PM
I am partial to the inserts that are the ones everybody disagrees with for small lathe use. My favorite is a CNMG 432 however I search around for tool holders on e-bay or buy import holder that I can put high quality inserts in. Then I just machine the toolholder with a dovetail to fit my BXA holder. I figure the import or used holder is less expensive than machining insert pockets The cutting of the dovetail and making a simple adjusting screw isn't that bad
[Ihttp://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20160331/4aacec899c08de65d729daca3cd153fa.jpgMG][/IMG]

Sent from my SM-T550 using Tapatalk

sawlog
03-31-2016, 09:06 PM
I am partial to the inserts that are the ones everybody disagrees with for small lathe use. My favorite is a CNMG 432 however I search around for tool holders on e-bay or buy import holder that I can put high quality inserts in. Then I just machine the toolholder with a dovetail to fit my BXA holder. I figure the import or used holder is less expensive than machining insert pockets The cutting of the dovetail and making a simple adjusting screw isn't that bad
http://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20160331/5b7b49c22cd03122b9c11d3c63d5908c.jpg

Sent from my SM-T550 using Tapatalk

KEJR
04-01-2016, 07:32 AM
The down side is that the head of the tool is rather big, so it will not work for areas where the groove is less than 1/2 inch.

Dan

I suppose You could mill a bigger chamfer such that the holder was only a little bigger than the insert? I kind of like the offset since you can get closer to the Chuck with your quick change holder.

I also found micro 100 makes boring bars up to 5/8 using the ccmt 21.51 ... not cheap though.

I have found facing milling cutters that take ccmt but they are very expensive. They tend to use the corners not used by lathe operations.

Yondering
04-01-2016, 12:37 PM
I am partial to the inserts that are the ones everybody disagrees with for small lathe use. My favorite is a CNMG 432 however I search around for tool holders on e-bay or buy import holder that I can put high quality inserts in. Then I just machine the toolholder with a dovetail to fit my BXA holder. I figure the import or used holder is less expensive than machining insert pockets The cutting of the dovetail and making a simple adjusting screw isn't that bad

Huh. That seems like a pretty good idea. I have a BXA toolpost too and will have to remember this. What size is the shank on the tool in your pictures?

Yondering
04-01-2016, 12:39 PM
I also found micro 100 makes boring bars up to 5/8 using the ccmt 21.51 ... not cheap though.


I don't have any experience with them, but a lot of Chinese boring bars for those inserts are on eBay, ranging from about $6 to $30 per bar. They appear to be the same thing Enco sells for $60+ per bar under the "Interstate" brand. I've considered buying some of these and using quality inserts in them.

sawlog
04-01-2016, 06:25 PM
Huh. That seems like a pretty good idea. I have a BXA toolpost too and will have to remember this. What size is the shank on the tool in your pictures?
It was a 1 inch shank. I have done 3/4 and 1 1/2 shank tools with good results . I also use a 1/4 x 20 all thread rod for the stud and make my own adjuster

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