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Tony
05-15-2016, 02:08 PM
Finally made an overarm support for the Schaublin.
First impressions: horizontal milling is frightening. And I like it.

Not my typical video style -- bit of an experiment. :p

5/8" cutter, 18T, about 0.4" DOC (wanted to go deeper but realized I had run out of headroom in my setup).
60 rpm and about 0.5 IPM.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cw7Mwd6ey6g


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cw7Mwd6ey6g

sasquatch
05-15-2016, 03:10 PM
Thanks for the cool video Tony.

Richard P Wilson
05-15-2016, 03:26 PM
An impressive piece of work! I particularly liked the technique for cutting the block out of the original rectangular lump of metal. Do tell us the details! I do admit I didn't understand the sequence just before the appearance of the bronze blank for the bearing.

Mcgyver
05-15-2016, 03:29 PM
great looking machine you've there....when you get used to it you'll want to take a real cut :D :D

adatesman
05-15-2016, 03:34 PM
0.5"/min is on the slow side of things... You mentioned 18 teeth and 60rpm, so at 0.002"/tooth you'd want ~2.16ipm, and even /that/ is conservative!

Rosco-P
05-15-2016, 03:34 PM
The bushing for the arbor, any decision process for not boring it out in-place on the overarm? Possibly achieve better/ultimate alignment with the spindle?

nc5a
05-15-2016, 03:46 PM
Nicely done Tony. I always enjoy your projects and the production details that go into sharing them and I'm a better home shop machinist because of it. Thanks

danlb
05-15-2016, 03:54 PM
I do admit I didn't understand the sequence just before the appearance of the bronze blank for the bearing.

Looked like he used copper + tin + phosphorus to make phosphor bronze. The chili pepper was because you can't melt the alloy without adding heat.

Dan

danlb
05-15-2016, 03:55 PM
Tony, that was a great video. It was engrossing, so much so that I did not even notice the passing of time.

Technically, it was spot on.

Thanks.

Dan

Michael Edwards
05-15-2016, 04:19 PM
Another great video. I like the way you removed the vertical head, it gave me a way to solve an upcoming project of my own.

I got a pretty good guess what was in your left hand at 2:18 :p

laddy
05-15-2016, 04:27 PM
WoW!
Great build and machining. Rather aggressive bite for a first pass on the horizontal. I have a small Atlas. It is scary and I take very small bites with it.

flylo
05-15-2016, 04:45 PM
WOW nice job! Thanks

firbikrhd1
05-15-2016, 04:59 PM
Fantastic video and machining.

RB211
05-15-2016, 05:54 PM
That was an "artsy" video. Nice mill. Nice work.

Richard P Wilson
05-15-2016, 06:40 PM
[QUOTE=danlb;1049013]Looked like he used copper + tin + phosphorus to make phosphor bronze. The chili pepper was because you can't melt the alloy without adding heat.

Oh, thanks for the explanation, I think it was the chilli pepper that confused me.

daryl bane
05-15-2016, 07:14 PM
Yep, that would have garnered an "A+" in film school.

boslab
05-15-2016, 08:37 PM
Enjoyable, well planned and executed, it's not like you can make one to find out how to make one then film it, thank you
Mark

Tony
05-16-2016, 06:54 AM
Thanks all. Too kind. But glad you liked it.


Mcgyver/adatesman: baby steps!


Rosco: That was actually my first inclination (boring in place) but the spindle and
the overarms are one piece, to advance the work I would have had to tap it along with
a hammer. I suppose I could've used a large C-clamp and screwed it through.


Michael Edwards: at first I didn't realize what you were talking about.. i was worried
maybe a beer-in-hand or something made it through the editing process. Then I checked
what 2:18 was. Then it clicked. No lie, my wife came running into the living room
thought I was having a seizure. Haven't laughed like that in years. :o

adatesman
05-16-2016, 07:24 AM
Mcgyver/adatesman: baby steps!


Oh, I quite agree and it takes a while to get used to just how fast a horizontal can peel off metal. First time I ran one (big old Milwaukee, I think) I ran the calcs, thought "that can't be right", confirmed it with the instructor, flipped the feed lever, then hid behind another machine. Yours is nowhere near as rigid as that machine, but capable of *far* more than the cut you took. :)

Rosco-P
05-16-2016, 07:27 AM
Rosco: That was actually my first inclination (boring in place) but the spindle and
the overarms are one piece, to advance the work I would have had to tap it along with
a hammer. I suppose I could've used a large C-clamp and screwed it through.



Lightly tighten the overmarm support onto the overarms, advance it into the boring bar held in the spindle using the table and an angle plate.

Mcgyver
05-16-2016, 07:41 AM
Mcgyver/adatesman: baby steps!
o

if it wasn't clear, I was kidding....making light of just what great material removers horizontals are.

adatesman
05-16-2016, 01:53 PM
if it wasn't clear, I was kidding....making light of just what great material removers horizontals are.

Flip side of that is 60rpm, 18 teeth, and 0.5ipm is under half a thou per tooth (0.00046"), which will rub the cutter to death. If 0.5ipm is where the OP is comfortable then it would have been better to use 0.002" per tooth and 15rpm. Same MRR, but nowhere near as hard on the cutter.

Tony
05-16-2016, 02:02 PM
60 rpm's as slow as I can go. Maybe 55? Like I said baby steps, started at 1/2 IPM and from where I was standing, chips looked pretty good.

I say that having absolutely no reference for what the chips off of a horiz cutter should look like. I'll crank it up and post some follow up pictures.

softtail
05-16-2016, 02:17 PM
Nice vid. Inspires me to wire up my Nichols which has been mothballed for a while.

The table that originally came with it had two very large chunks ripped out of it from slot to slot where a vise had once been bolted. Must have been a hell of a rodeo.

Horizontals make supreme tube notchers.

J Tiers
05-16-2016, 02:37 PM
Flip side of that is 60rpm, 18 teeth, and 0.5ipm is under half a thou per tooth (0.00046"), which will rub the cutter to death. If 0.5ipm is where the OP is comfortable then it would have been better to use 0.002" per tooth and 15rpm. Same MRR, but nowhere near as hard on the cutter.

Hmmmmm.

Maybe.....

I mean , I agree, but remember ALL horizontal mills doing conventional milling DO "rub" a LOT. The entry to the cut has the cutter edge nearly moving parallel to the cut, going from zero D.O.C. and gradually getting to approximately the set cut depth.

Yeah, less "rubbing" if you set up the feed higher, but it's not as if you can totally escape it.

adatesman
05-16-2016, 03:14 PM
Hmmmmm.

Maybe.....

I mean , I agree, but remember ALL horizontal mills doing conventional milling DO "rub" a LOT. The entry to the cut has the cutter edge nearly moving parallel to the cut, going from zero D.O.C. and gradually getting to approximately the set cut depth.

Yeah, less "rubbing" if you set up the feed higher, but it's not as if you can totally escape it.

No different than vertical milling, actually. But long story short, taking a big enough bite for the cutter to cut rather than rub will help with tool life. :)

mattthemuppet
05-16-2016, 03:20 PM
awesome machining and the opera singing/ cutting nearly made me spit my coffee all over my laptop. I do miss the Blaxploitation style though, this was a bit to "artsy" for me.

very inspiring though, especially the precision of the multiple bores. That's something that keeps stymieing me.

boslab
05-16-2016, 04:07 PM
I have a little Denbigh horizontal, the best cutters are the alternate inclined cut teeth, more shear less thump
Mark
http://abercutters.com/staggered.html

quasi
05-16-2016, 05:55 PM
at 10:28 the milling vise being used to hold the bushing appears to have a 4 way indexing fixed jaw . What make of vise is it I have never seen such a tool.

hephaestus
05-16-2016, 06:00 PM
Beautiful work and nice video.

gambler
05-16-2016, 07:09 PM
awesome video. thanks for sharing it.:)

Mcgyver
05-16-2016, 08:00 PM
I have a little Denbigh horizontal, the best cutters are the alternate inclined cut teeth, more shear less thump
Mark
http://abercutters.com/staggered.html

100% agree....those are the ones to collect, they are slightly more of a pita to sharpen (if you have a horizontal, you'll want a T&CG :) )

Stu
05-16-2016, 11:06 PM
Bravo! Has the Palme d'Or nominating committee seen this?

Stu

boslab
05-17-2016, 12:38 AM
Bravo! Has the Palme d'Or nominating committee seen this?

Stu
Would need French subtitles I think, plus a bit of nudity
Mark

PStechPaul
05-17-2016, 02:17 AM
Just caught up with this. Looks really good. The way you do it makes it seem easy. Is it really as quiet as it sounds? I'm used to my machines sounding like a jackhammer!

gambler
05-17-2016, 02:32 AM
Would need French subtitles I think, plus a bit of nudity
Mark
no, no no no. I don't want to see him nude.:(

Tony
05-17-2016, 11:42 AM
well that's just great.. 4 hours of footage, down the drain.



:p

mikelkie
05-17-2016, 03:05 PM
Excellent work, Thanks for sharing

Stu
05-17-2016, 04:10 PM
well that's just great.. 4 hours of footage, down the drain.



:p

Ah, the pain of the auteur.

‘without angst there cannot be art’ Wilbur Shakespeare

wcunning
10-17-2016, 08:23 AM
Tony,

I'm curious what the oil/grease gun was that you were using at the end to show the zerk fittings pumping into the oil channel you cut with the little burr into your bronze bearing? I've been looking for something like that for my ancient, oddball vertical mill (Rockford MV100, if anyone cares).

Thanks,
Will

A.K. Boomer
10-17-2016, 10:00 AM
Bravo again nice job on both the Vid and the support - and just enough special effects antics to let you know its Tony :p


every time I come across one of his vids im like - damn I don't have 10 or 15 minutes - but damn it's Tony, click... :)

The only improvement in the entire Vid that I seen would be if he had a set of vise grips setting next to the block of metal - then the vise grips are grabbed and you hear the clamping sound - then the high pitch singing lol

Tony
10-17-2016, 04:24 PM
Will, I don't recall off hand but I think it was just a plain ol' small-sized grease gun from a tractor supply store.
The kind with the spring loaded plunger you pull out the back and puts pressure on the oil (grease) -- I may have
modified the seal inside to keep oil from leaking back. I think just a few larger washers to keep the seal tighter
against the tube wall?

That said, I hardly ever pressurize the back end.. just pull the spring arm back and leave it locked. (there is a caulk-gun style lock)
If used "upside down" gravity will feed the pump in the head.

AK - thanks! I'll have to remember that vise grips one. ;)