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View Full Version : ID this insert?



J Tiers
07-09-2016, 01:17 PM
Middle one in the pic

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/jstanley/carbide%20insert%20for%20ID_zpsxegoq3i6.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/jstanley/media/carbide%20insert%20for%20ID_zpsxegoq3i6.jpg.html)

Right hand is a cheapie, left seems to be a chipbreaker or other accessory part.

Middle one is great. Have a few, want more.

A.K. Boomer
07-09-2016, 01:26 PM
never seen one like that JT - it does look like it would be a cutting mutha with uninterrupted chips though,

also - does not look typical fastening in the center to recess the screw and for holding strength ?

LKeithR
07-09-2016, 01:33 PM
Look for a TNMG-UX style. Different manufacturers have slightly different configurations--on the fringe of being proprietary designs. I use them from time to time and I know the ones I have at the shop are not quite the same and I can't remember the correct designation. Have to go in later today...I'll have a look and report back if someone else hasn't nailed it.

Inserts like that work pretty well on lighter machines, much like a nicely ground HSS. The only thing I don't like about them is that they tend to make long, stringy chips...

Willy
07-09-2016, 02:12 PM
Looks like a proprietary chip breaker style TNMM.

Like the one in the link below.

https://www.fastenal.com/products/details/3200160

J Tiers
07-09-2016, 02:56 PM
Yeesh... they sure do like them at Fastenal.... 17 bucks each? Looks like I have hundreds of dollars worth.

This type the chip depends on feed rate. Light feed, you get long thready chips. heavy feed, you get little balls all rolled up. The latter are not so bad.

lakeside53
07-09-2016, 04:43 PM
The listing shows zero relief. It's a positive rake insert for use a negative holder. I use WNMG types PR in negative holder more for finishing work.

Fastenal like Grainger and MSC has stupid "list" prices for such stuff. Travers will stock or get you Walter inserts.

J Tiers
07-12-2016, 04:45 PM
Look for a TNMG-UX style. .......

Inserts like that work pretty well on lighter machines, much like a nicely ground HSS. The only thing I don't like about them is that they tend to make long, stringy chips...

Not always. Get the feed right and your chips are like this, which is perfectly fine.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/jstanley/Insert%20chips_zpsdjybbuhe.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/jstanley/media/Insert%20chips_zpsdjybbuhe.jpg.html)

I notice that not everyone seems to agree on what that code is.... a couple were pretty standard looking like the cheap inserts, no "swoop", just standard "gutter" chipbreaker

Guster
07-12-2016, 09:42 PM
Got one like that on a boring bar that I really like. I think I also found it is a UX style chipbreaker. Looks like TNMG rather than TNMM that has the countersunk/beveled/chamfered hole.

From Seco -
"UX - Chipbreaker for negative inserts. Positive cutting rake with sharp edge. Low cutting force. Suitable for slim components."
"UX chipbreaker - Low to medium cut, strong edge with good chip control in higher chipload conditions"

cmantunes
07-13-2016, 05:21 PM
I believe this is a negative rake insert with special chipbreaker to lower cutting forces. To activate chipbreaker, you need something like 40 thou depth of cut, though (according to Seco.)