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View Full Version : What to Glue That Perforated Foam Drawer/Shelf Liner to Base



Paul Alciatore
07-22-2016, 03:26 AM
I want to put some of that perforated foam drawer/shelf liner on a base I have made for an arbor press. I have tried double sided tape before, but it does not hold up well in a shop environment. Anybody have a better suggestion?

Stu
07-22-2016, 06:41 AM
I used 3M spray adhesive on several drawers using the same liner and it seems to work well. Stu

Glug
07-22-2016, 09:33 AM
What about magnets in the corners?

Bob Fisher
07-22-2016, 12:55 PM
I, myself would never glue it, it should stay put if everything is clean.Old glue is such a pain to remove. Mine are staying well for 20 plus yrs. Bob.

Paul Alciatore
07-23-2016, 01:32 AM
I guess I am guilty of not being clear enough. I want it on the BOTTOM of the base, which is a piece of 2 x 12 lumber which has been well painted. I want a non-slip surface so it does not move around on the work bench, scratching up both itself and the bench.

And yes, I do plan to have some kind of hold downs to keep it from moving around or lifting while I use it. But for storage I plan to move it further back on the bench and perhaps turn it sideways. So I do think I will need some kind of fastening to keep it in place.

BCRider
07-23-2016, 03:03 AM
We're talking about the stuff that is soft and squishy that looks like beads of foam on a spider's web? If that's the stuff it started out as non skid matting for motor homes and trailers as one of the main uses. I've found that it's a high enough friction material that simply putting a layer on the bench then setting the tool kit onto it should do the trick. Needless to say both the bench and the tool kit bottom should be clean. As long as you don't need to use excess sideways pressure on the press it should stay in place just fine.

darryl
07-23-2016, 03:26 AM
While fully appreciating the task of removing most kinds of adhesives, I have to suggest contact cement. The stuff we use at work could be sprayed on one surface only and still give a high friction. I'd spray it on the shelf liner and let it dry until tacky. Then mount it on the surface where you want it and roll it on a bit. It will not be as strong a bond as if you had sprayed both surfaces, but it will most likely stay in place as well as you need it to. You should also be able to peel it off without leaving a glue mess behind. At least this way if the shelf liner gets torn up you can replace it.

I've used 3M-77 and found it to be pretty good. There is definitely a difference between various brands and products. Many aren't much good at all- but this could also be a benefit if you don't want holding power.

There is also the issue of compatibility- will the spray glue of choice eat the shelf liner material? A test would be in order.

Puckdropper
07-23-2016, 03:33 AM
I guess I am guilty of not being clear enough. I want it on the BOTTOM of the base, which is a piece of 2 x 12 lumber which has been well painted. I want a non-slip surface so it does not move around on the work bench, scratching up both itself and the bench.

And yes, I do plan to have some kind of hold downs to keep it from moving around or lifting while I use it. But for storage I plan to move it further back on the bench and perhaps turn it sideways. So I do think I will need some kind of fastening to keep it in place.

I'd probably look at a spray adhesive for this purpose, you have the advantage that the non-slip surface is held by the weight of the device, so physics is on your side. It'd be worth cleaning the surfaces before applying the adhesive, as adhesive sticks really well to dust but dust doesn't stick all that well to surfaces.

If you've got space for a bolt-on rubber piece, hockey pucks might be just the thing. I've been tossing the chipped ones out of my bag and saving them for spacer/riser type projects. They're about 1" tall, so it's easy to recess a bolt head without compromising the integrity of the puck. You can buy them individually from MC Sports or certain other sporting goods chains, or get a decent price by buying them from Lee Valley.

mogli
07-23-2016, 03:33 AM
Have you tried Bondini Glue? It is a preferred glue for the garage, shop or other dirty environment. This glue works on most surfaces including wood, nylon, vinyl, ceramics, brick and even leather.

daGrouch
07-23-2016, 07:23 PM
Sprays like Super-77 and regular old rubber contact cement should be okay.
Loctite brand epoxies and thread locker are okay while their tube (Grabber) and sprays seem to deteriorate and fall apart.

That foam pad can wick up oils and stuff that can soften adhesives so, in your place, I would slather a thick coat of glossy oil paint onto the base and embed the mat into that. Self sealing and no open areas of glue to attract dirt and gunk. I imagine a trowel coat of adhesive caulk would work, also.

BCRider
07-23-2016, 07:56 PM
If you're just looking for something to slide the press around on and it'll be fixed in use then try a patch of rubber back carpet matting. Put it rubber side up for the press on its base to sit on. The carpet side makes it fairly easy to slide on any bench surface other than raw wood.

If it is raw wood or painted wood it may not be so good.

alanganes
07-23-2016, 09:24 PM
I have successfully attached this stuff to small items using clear RTV silicone. You have to not over do it so it does not squish out everywhere, but it seems to work well enough. I was not using this on something quite that heavy. Food for thought.

CCWKen
07-24-2016, 08:17 AM
I want to put some of that perforated foam drawer/shelf liner on a base I have made for an arbor press. I have tried double sided tape before, but it does not hold up well in a shop environment. Anybody have a better suggestion?
Don't use it. It's not made for heavy weight or "shop environment".

I guess I don't understand the need for the pad. Is the arbor press bolted down?

I just bought a set of cheap car mats ($7 at Walmart) to use as new skirting on a walk behind trimmer I just repowered and renovated. Other than the small dimples on the bottom, they makes good bench pads too. The dimples are small enough not to interfere. Or you can turn the bottom side up and use the dimples to keep hardware from rolling around.

Magicniner
07-24-2016, 01:26 PM
Don't glue it, staple it ;-)

Paul Alciatore
07-25-2016, 12:26 AM
That thought had crossed my mind after I started the thread, but I wanted to see the glue suggestions.




Don't glue it, staple it ;-)