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Andre3127
09-08-2016, 01:39 PM
I have a 19th century T.Taylor metal lathe that I bought for $35 as my first metal lathe along with a Craftsman 109 for $75. The 109 is a much better "Machine", so after being frustrated with the ye-olde Taylor lathe just used the 109 till I got a SB13. And actually, I still enjoy using the 109. The Taylor lathe is just sitting in my barn, taking up space, but I can't sell it. If I did the next owner would become so frustrated it would undoubtedly go to the scrapper. The spindle has a silly nose thread, any form of power feed/threading is all but gone, only half of the back gears remain, and tailstock base is cracked. There isn't even tapers for centers, and the halfnuts are made from soft lead! I'm just keeping it as a relic, because I've never even seem pictures of another one.

Does anybody out there have any machines made by the T.Taylor company in England? They also made benchtop planers.

If any collector is interested in the lathe, well I just want my $35 back. I'm in Upstate NY. No user owners, it's useful service life is just over. Will send pics for serious inquiries. Promise it will go to a good, safe home away from the scrapper.

Mcgyver
09-08-2016, 02:04 PM
I have a 19th century T.Taylor metal lathe that I bought for $35 as my first metal lathe along with a Craftsman 109 for $75. The 109 is a much better "Machine", .

wow, that's an indictment! Sounds like it should be put out of its misery. Could it be re-purposed as a wood lathe? That might help find someone

Andre3127
09-08-2016, 02:50 PM
wow, that's an indictment! Sounds like it should be put out of its misery. Could it be re-purposed as a wood lathe? That might help find someone
I just didn't want to fool around fixing it. As stated it's missing back gear and threading features, which the 109 has. If both machines were new, and not missing parts, it would beat the 109.

It sure could be used as a pattern makers lathe, and I've used it to turn a bit of wood.

Sent from my phone using Tapatalk.

Robin R
09-08-2016, 03:55 PM
T Taylor has a piece on the Lathes UK site. http://www.lathes.co.uk/ttaylor/ It seems that they are extremely rare, though a thread on Practical Machinist has turned up at least one more. http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/antique-machinery-and-history/very-old-t-taylor-lathe-anyone-know-anything-167171/ You could take some decent pictures of your lathe and send them to Tony, on the Lathes UK site, he gives a live link on the page in question. Given the rarity you might well find a collector that would be pleased to take the lathe off your hands, Dennis Turk who posts on the antique machinery forum on Practical Machinist might well be interested, or put you in touch with someone who might be interested. If you can't track Dennis Turk down on PM, you could try the Dalton user group on Yahoo, as apparently he is quite active on there. https://login.yahoo.com/config/login;_ylt=AtI46q.M_jXQ2vBSmsjhpB.gwsEF?.src=ygrp&.intl=us&.lang=en-US&.done=https://groups.yahoo.com%2Fneo%2Fgroups%2Fdaltonlathes%2Fi nfo

Andre3127
09-08-2016, 10:35 PM
T Taylor has a piece on the Lathes UK site. http://www.lathes.co.uk/ttaylor/ It seems that they are extremely rare, though a thread on Practical Machinist has turned up at least one more. http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/antique-machinery-and-history/very-old-t-taylor-lathe-anyone-know-anything-167171/ You could take some decent pictures of your lathe and send them to Tony, on the Lathes UK site, he gives a live link on the page in question. Given the rarity you might well find a collector that would be pleased to take the lathe off your hands, Dennis Turk who posts on the antique machinery forum on Practical Machinist might well be interested, or put you in touch with someone who might be interested. If you can't track Dennis Turk down on PM, you could try the Dalton user group on Yahoo, as apparently he is quite active on there. https://login.yahoo.com/config/login;_ylt=AtI46q.M_jXQ2vBSmsjhpB.gwsEF?.src=ygrp&.intl=us&.lang=en-US&.done=https://groups.yahoo.com%2Fneo%2Fgroups%2Fdaltonlathes%2Fi nfo

Thanks for the reply. I've already looked at those links, and might contact Dennis at some time. I also have to send pics of a Walker Turner Driver wood lathe I have to Tony, as only a few known examples of them are known online. Every darn machine tool I have is rare ;););)

ulav8r
09-09-2016, 01:02 AM
The OP violates the user agreement that prohibits selling on the forum.

boslab
09-09-2016, 03:06 AM
I was told when I was a kid that there was a cobbler, aka shoe repairer living in the village that had a lathe made by Taylor, the lathe in question was driven by a tradle arrangement, I later saw the thing and remember the big flywheel which reminded me of my mother's singer sewing machine, but bigger (90k?)
It would be a shame to scrap what is a little peice of history, it should be in a museum.
As for lead half nuts, the surprising part is the fact it had any at all!
Aim to find a museum and donate it seems like a plan.
Mark

Rosco-P
09-09-2016, 06:41 AM
The OP violates the user agreement that prohibits selling on the forum.

Big difference between trying to find a home for a rare lathe and asking for pocket change and the blatant selling thinly disguised as a gloat posted by a certain HSM member.

Rosco-P
09-09-2016, 06:42 AM
I was told when I was a kid that there was a cobbler, aka shoe repairer living in the village that had a lathe made by Taylor, the lathe in question was driven by a tradle arrangement, I later saw the thing and remember the big flywheel which reminded me of my mother's singer sewing machine, but bigger (90k?)
It would be a shame to scrap what is a little peice of history, it should be in a museum.
As for lead half nuts, the surprising part is the fact it had any at all!
Aim to find a museum and donate it seems like a plan.
Mark

Maybe Babbit or a similar alloy?

Andre3127
09-09-2016, 12:54 PM
Maybe Babbit or a similar alloy?

Possibly, but if it was a babbit alloy it would have a very low tin content. It's very soft.

Also possible they were remade at some point, I bet this type of repair would've been common when this lathe was made.

old mart
09-09-2016, 02:25 PM
Is there a museum you could donate it to as you obviously don't want to see it scrapped.

Daveb
09-09-2016, 04:02 PM
Museums tend to be really picky about accepting donations of anything but cash. Space is valuable to them and storing stuff costs money.
I had an old surface grinder, absolute dog, everything was worn out or broken. I kept it for years and tried to think of a way to resurrect it. I scrapped it in the end, bit of a relief really, I didn't have to look at the damn thing anymore.
Dave

old mart
09-09-2016, 05:00 PM
Its certainly worth trying museums, they can only say no. A lady arrived at our museum a few years ago with several boxes of tools which were her late husbands. He had worked on airframes and the tools were top quality, including half a dozed Desoutter air tools. She had offered them to a much larger museum south of us and they had sent her away without even looking at them. We welcomed her with open arms, really grateful for the valued gift.