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mars-red
10-04-2016, 08:43 AM
Thought my latest one might be of interest here, I know on the occasions I've posted my shop made cutting tools in the Shop Made Tools thread, there are usually questions about how they're made.

Part of the video is discussing some of the cutting tools I've made over the past few years, and part of the video is making and testing a multi-tooth milling cutter for a future project.

On my growing list of video ideas is the topic of heat treating in the home shop, to get much more in depth on that subject.

https://youtu.be/7uJ82KqqM54


https://youtu.be/7uJ82KqqM54

Dan_the_Chemist
10-04-2016, 04:33 PM
I haven't watched the entire video yet... I am still laughing from the musical intro in the first 30 seconds. HILARIOUS !!!!

Dan
Subscriber #30 - when do I get my numbered fan club card?

BCRider
10-04-2016, 05:50 PM
Done more than a few cutters and custom size taps of my own. All small so far because I don't have any sort of "furnace". Like you I've relied on a straight torch which means the size is VERY limited.

I don't need a whole lot more ability though. And most of the issue is lose of heat due to the part and flame being out in the open so the heat dissipates as fast as we put it in with the flame. Move the flame a half inch and that part being bared cools too much.

A project to get around this is a "soup can forge". The working space is only about 1.5" diameter and about 4 inches long for a long soup can. But it will hold the heat in and allow heating up cutter parts that are far larger than I can do with a naked flame. And 1.5 x 4" is about all that a Bernzomatic torch can heat up properly anyway.

mars-red
10-04-2016, 10:29 PM
I haven't watched the entire video yet... I am still laughing from the musical intro in the first 30 seconds. HILARIOUS !!!!

Dan
Subscriber #30 - when do I get my numbered fan club card?

LOL, I'm glad you at least enjoyed the intro, don't worry the rest of the vid goes right downhill! :)

Great idea about the fan club cards, haha.


Done more than a few cutters and custom size taps of my own. All small so far because I don't have any sort of "furnace". Like you I've relied on a straight torch which means the size is VERY limited.

I don't need a whole lot more ability though. And most of the issue is lose of heat due to the part and flame being out in the open so the heat dissipates as fast as we put it in with the flame. Move the flame a half inch and that part being bared cools too much.

A project to get around this is a "soup can forge". The working space is only about 1.5" diameter and about 4 inches long for a long soup can. But it will hold the heat in and allow heating up cutter parts that are far larger than I can do with a naked flame. And 1.5 x 4" is about all that a Bernzomatic torch can heat up properly anyway.

Great idea about the soup can forge! That might just be the perfect little project when the cold weather really sets in here.

Dan and BC, thanks for the support I really appreciate it!

fixerup
10-04-2016, 10:45 PM
I like learning this craft of making your own cutters. When a job comes up and you don't have such a cutter, it sure gets you out of a bind. I really like the simplicity and ease of making that saw cutter. Thanks for posting.
Phil

legendboy
10-12-2016, 10:05 AM
What lathe are you using, rivet? I like the boring bar mount. Seems set free
I will say rotary broaching is definitely something I would love to make sometime
Thanks for making the video for us noobs

mars-red
10-12-2016, 10:49 AM
What lathe are you using, rivet? I like the boring bar mount. Seems set free
I will say rotary broaching is definitely something I would love to make sometime
Thanks for making the video for us noobs
Yes that's correct, it's the Rivett 8" Precision lathe I'm using in that vid. It's not specifically a boring bar mount (though it's very convenient for boring bars), rather, it's a proprietary tool post design patented by Edward Rivett himself, and was used on many Rivett and Hjorth lathes of various sizes. The design offers a lot of flexibility, you could even get things like indexing work holding attachments to fit the tool post, making it well suited for things like gear cutting. It takes some getting used to using round shank turning tools, but round HSS blanks are readily available. The one drawback of the Rivett eccentric tool post is that there's no tool change repeatability like you'd get with a quick change tool post.

J Tiers on here also owns a Rivett and he isn't a fan of the eccentric tool post at all. My guess is that his sentiment would be shared by most. I tend to like oddball designs (and really, the Rivett is a showcase of wonderfully oddball designs).