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David Powell
10-06-2016, 08:55 AM
I am really a steam engine enthusiast who fell into being a home shop machinist to build the models I could not afford to buy. I had 32 years in one basement shop, which I used for hobby and business purposes. My wife died, I gave up the house and moved in with a friend whose hobbies include woodwork, dolls houses, needlework, miniatures of all sorts. I am just about at the end of sorting out what I kept and brought with me, and organising what I bought to replace and update some of the old tools I had dragged home . I have a whole slew of projects to finish off, a collection of finished models in working order, and now a workshop ready to meet ( almost!!) every need I might have. However, I do not seem to have quite the enthusiasm for using the shop as I had in actually building it up. Indeed some of the obscure workshop projects which have been lurking for a long time seem more tempting than the models I intend to finish off. Has anyone else felt this way, do some of you JUST build, repair, renovate, buy, tools for their own sake with no real intention or need for them to contribute to complete their projects. Regards David Powell.

bborr01
10-06-2016, 09:35 AM
It's kind of like being a boy scout. Being ready for any project that comes along.

Brian

Carm
10-06-2016, 09:56 AM
I'm guessing you're an older fellow.
If the spirit moves you, go in that direction. Or, as Joseph Campbell said, follow the bliss.
Constraints of youth and mid-age no longer press so hard, the nose comes off the grindstone.
60 is middle aged if you live to 120.

Might produce mixed feelings...just remember, not a one of us will do everything we intended.

Fasttrack
10-06-2016, 10:04 AM
... do some of you JUST build, repair, renovate, buy, tools for their own sake with no real intention or need for them to contribute to complete their projects. Regards David Powell.

Yes. :) I got started machining because of my desire to have a go-kart when I was a kid. Now I find that the pursuit of the "perfect shop" is more fun than actually using the shop! It's like Brian said... "being ready for any project that comes along". I take a great deal of pride and satisfaction from the fact that I can maintain or fix everything I own. I've even amassed a well equipped electronics shop with an entire wall of common components down to teeny-tiny little sizes so I can rework even modern circuit boards. I'll probably never use them but they sure make me happy knowing I've got them :D

TGTool
10-06-2016, 10:27 AM
I was in tool engineering for a number of years. I've got a small business that required machining, but tools have become for me what I think models are for others - an opportunity for creativity in both design and fabrication. I have a Quorn tool and cutter grinder I'm still filling out with small accessories. I've got a take off on the Bemis Sine Fixture in the works and have my eye on a design for a boring and facing head.

So the hobby and the business overlap and feed each other.

mudnducs
10-06-2016, 10:28 AM
Dont feel like the Lone Ranger there Mr Powell. I've been very fortunate in the last three years to now have the working space I always wanted. Bike nut here...always wante dto design and build my own motorcycle frames....light and stiff. Now I find that I have all the tools I need to start, but a tiny nagging fear that I might not be able to actually DO what I want is staring me in the face. So I havent got off TDC. Carm drilled it.

Toolguy
10-06-2016, 10:38 AM
I have found that as time goes by, priorities change. Sometimes you get burnt out on something, have more or less money or space, more or less family obligations, different interests, etc., etc. Go with the flow. Sometimes after doing something else for a while you will get the urge to go back to something previous. I think it's good to have a change of scenery every so often. It keeps life more interesting.

Mcgyver
10-06-2016, 10:45 AM
It's kind of like being a boy scout. Being ready for any project that comes along.


I'm very caught up i that. Machines of every size and description, grinding honing welding casting watchmaking, its a long list most bought for next to nothing, some needing reconditioning, and many more need all manner of concocted tooling and accessories. I do appreciate the "art" of fine tools and taught myself how to recondition them which exacerbates the spiral into machining and tool oblivion. End of the day, it is a very enjoyable feeling to be able to take on just about anything within the work envelope and get professional (mostly :)) results.

i've projects to build projects to build projects. Must have 500 by now. haven't a clue where each leads to, the labyrinth is too complex.....even where it began is very fuzzy. something to do with model engines. So many things on the go sometimes what is supposed to be fun feels like pressure. Other than that.....so long as its mostly entertaining its good. Dave, maybe after all time make engines you need a change. I'm feeling like all this time making tooling and reconditioning I need to make fun stuff; engines, clocks, drawing machines, oreys.....fun stuff

Tim Clarke
10-06-2016, 11:40 AM
Well, building up a shop can be a hobby in itself. I'm guilty of this, and have spent a lot of time assembling mine. Lots of things were in tough shape when they arrived, but now all function well, and look good. My needs evolved over the years, from a dry place to work on my car, to the man cave I have now. I have a clean, warm place that I can spend my time doing whatever. As far as keeping up the interest, I recommend going to a couple of model engineering shows. You'll find lots of interesting things, not just model engines.

Michael Moore
10-06-2016, 12:22 PM
mudnducs, building frames isn't something so esoteric that a reasonably-handy craftperson can't do it. The ones you design and build may not be cutting edge, but then most of us probably strive to meet "good enough" standards. You can find a lot of information/inspiration for your frame projects on my website

http://www.eurospares.com

" So many things on the go sometimes what is supposed to be fun feels like pressure. Other than that.....so long as its mostly entertaining its good."

It took me a long time to realize that. Beating myself up because I'm not being productive in my hobby didn't help me with wanting to work on the projects.

There are so many different interesting things to do and life (or what is left of it) is far to short to do even a small fraction of them. Do (or accumulate) what you want when you want, and take what enjoyment you can at the time. When you are dead the unfinished projects won't be bothering you at all.

cheers,
Michael

mudnducs
10-06-2016, 12:42 PM
mudnducs, building frames isn't something so esoteric that a reasonably-handy craftperson can't do it. The ones you design and build may not be cutting edge, but then most of us probably strive to meet "good enough" standards. You can find a lot of information/inspiration for your frame projects on my website

http://www.eurospares.com

" So many things on the go sometimes what is supposed to be fun feels like pressure. Other than that.....so long as its mostly entertaining its good."

It took me a long time to realize that. Beating myself up because I'm not being productive in my hobby didn't help me with wanting to work on the projects.

There are so many different interesting things to do and life (or what is left of it) is far to short to do even a small fraction of them. Do (or accumulate) what you want when you want, and take what enjoyment you can at the time. When you are dead the unfinished projects won't be bothering you at all.

cheers,
Michael



Thanks Mike!!

_Paul_
10-06-2016, 12:51 PM
It's a slippery slope.... I originally started many years ago with an interest in precession so bought my first lathe an abused Myford ML7 to make gyroscopes .... then it started and I guess most of it comes from being too much of a perfectionist all the bits that were wrong with the Myford I felt compelled to fix... damaged backgears, damaged bed, spindle issues....... then improved it painted it fitted new belts an inverter, made a milling slide...... the Myford sits alongside many other machines now.... still haven't made any gyroscopes yet ...

BCRider
10-06-2016, 01:21 PM
David, I know EXACTLY how you feel and I'm suffering from the same thing. Have been for the past two years since my own dream shop reached the point where I was "mostly" done.

I spent roughly 3 of the first 5 years in the new house performing renovations to prepare for and finally build up my own dream retirement shops for wood, metal, models, motorcycles and firearms. The other two years was doing things to the house to fix issues or working on other rooms. The shop work included removing unwanted walls, building other walls. Installing plumbing and some major electrical work for water and optimum lighting and power. Then building all the benches and cabinetry. Air lines and dust collection and optimizing the storage and so much more.

Building a shop of the level is hard to let go of when we're close to finished. It's a massive and alluring project all its own. And it took so long in my case that it was hard to realize where it was finished and that I could move on to actually using it as a shop. And during that transition I felt exactly like you where I'd rather work on finishing up some area of the shop or even organizing and installing drawer separators than working on an actual project.

But that was about two years ago that I reached that point. I fought myself through a 4 to 6 month transition of choosing between shop work and actually making something just like you're going through now. But I came out of that time and now I can truly appreciate working in the very best shop I've ever had or worked in.

An unforeseen advantage is that because I spent a LOT of OCD time at the end just organizing the storage of tools and supplies is that it is now surprisingly easy and quick to clean up a cluttered bench top. Everything has it's place close by and it's only a few minutes to get things to where the rest of the junk is actually garbage to be swept away into the trash using the handy bench brush hanging within arm's reach at each work location.

It was while showing off the shop and organized drawers that one of them said to me words that I realized I needed to embrace "You need to stop making stuff to make stuff and just start making stuff". I realized he was right and that it was time to shift my focus. It took a while and there were still many hours of working ON the shop instead of IN the shop. But I got there. And DAMN! IT WAS WORTH IT! What a fantastic place to work in now! I can honestly say that it's the best shop I've ever worked in that I've done for myself or that I worked in during my professional career.

mklotz
10-06-2016, 01:37 PM
I empathize with the OP and all the others who have experienced "the shop IS the project" syndrome.

I quickly discovered that designing a shop just isn't possible for me. Shop design is evolutionary. You can't decide how a shop should be laid out until you work on a project in it. Unfortunately, projects differ so the design evolves along different directions as you work.

I finally decided to shift my focus to making every tool, no matter how infrequently used, as accessible as possible. That in itself is a Herculean task and, if you collect tools (who here doesn't), even that task becomes evolutionary.

It all points to a giant mess as a solution, but my OCD simply won't tolerate that. I comfort myself with the thought that, if this is one of my big problems, I'm pretty damn lucky.

larry_g
10-06-2016, 02:05 PM
At one point in time I was involved with model railroading, HO scale. I found that there were many factions to the hobby and most would be gooe at one or two and tolerate the rest. Some modeled history, some liked operating trains, some were engrossed in the electronics, some liked to build layouts with buildings and scenery, some scale accuracy, and a few others. Point being there is a lot of room under the umbrella of model railroading.

I think the same applies here. Members of this forum have a wide variety of interests, skills, desires. As a young man hot rods were all that mattered to me. I lusted after a shop like I have today. However now that I have the shop, old cars are not on the radar. The last thing I want to do is repair cars. I've found that working on old machines fills the need I have to tinker. My machines all work well but all are in need of a painter. I hate to paint and will only do so to preserve. I sill not do it make perty. I really appreciate the beautiful machines some have, I'm just not the one to make them perty.

So there is no right or wrong in where you are. Other peoples yardsticks cannot measure you. You have to enjoy by your own rules.

lg
no neat sig line

Mike Burch
10-06-2016, 06:58 PM
I really hate it when impractical friends see my workshops for the first time and innocently ask "What you do make with all this stuff?" I try to avoid giving away the fact that the true answer is just "things". I can usually impress them into silence by pointing to the front end loader I made for my tractor. They don't need to know how unrepresentative that is.
Like many posters on this thread (and man, is it ever a relief to find I'm not alone!) I spend most of my shed time making things to make things to repair and improve other things.

fixerdave
10-06-2016, 09:24 PM
... However, I do not seem to have quite the enthusiasm for using the shop as I had in actually building it up. Indeed some of the obscure workshop projects which have been lurking for a long time seem more tempting than the models I intend to finish off. Has anyone else felt this way, do some of you JUST build, repair, renovate, buy, tools for their own sake with no real intention or need for them to contribute to complete their projects. Regards David Powell.

Depends... my shop does have a practical side in keeping my beater vehicles running, which I consider actually paying for my rented shop. But, most of my shop is just a collection. Not really a collection of things, but rather of capabilities. I want to have the tools and skills to do things, but I don't really have any particular desire to, you know, actually do them. It's also why I have a lot of unfinished projects about... once I know that I can do them, I tend to lose interest.

I will say this... I took a 2 week vacation this summer and all I did was go to my shop, sit there, and decide what I felt like doing at that moment. I didn't even consider the list of things that had to be done, nor the list of important things to be done, nor the list of what other people wanted me to do. I just did what I felt like doing. I had a blast. Best vacation I've had in years.

What did I end up doing? Just working on tools for the shop. Not important tools, mind you, just stuff I felt like doing. I had so much fun doing it that I'm actually having a hard time breaking out of the pattern. So many squirrels are calling out to me that the important stuff is getting left behind. If I don't fix my van soon, I'm going to be walking.

I do have a big project coming up... making a 7.5" gauge ride-on electric train, selfishly hoping to get my train-loving kid involved in shop-type stuff. Just ideas so far, but (putting on my best stiff-upper-lip British accent) I've been accepted in the Vancouver Island Model Engineers Society. Seems the requirements are that you can breath, though I suspect mechanical assistance in that would get a pass. I've got lots of plans (in my head), lots of parts (salvaged electric wheelchair), batteries (salvaged from a UPS at work), a bag of cheap bearings from China, and I think I've got a way to make the 16 wheels I'll need. I just have to stop making tools for my tools long enough to, you know, actually start work on the train. Can't complain about not finishing something I haven't even started yet.

David...

J Tiers
10-06-2016, 09:43 PM
It's interesting. I had things I wanted to do, mostly engines/motors, originally.

I have developed such an odd collection of skills in the process, that I don;t know just WHAT I do with the shop. I have made a good bit of tooling, often for work, I have made prototype pieces for others. I have made punch and die sets. I repair my own machinery, including a small collection of old gas engines, I have helped friends fix their yard and farm equipment, making or modifying parts, and when I need tools or "things" around the house and property, I tend to make them.

I may BUILD some engines. I have a particular Aero engine in mind, and I'd like one of the engines (a Jaeger) to have a couple of smaller brothers. I may just invent a crazy engine and try to make a running version, I have a friend who likes engines "with parts that are going in all directions" as they run, and a Rube Goldberg engine might fill that bill.

I enjoy all of it.

Even fixing mills and lathes. I've been through, or partly through, 5 lathes so far, a shaper, three drill presses, a T&C grinder, and a couple of milling machines. I think that's the lot. Some have been scraped fully for alignment, some partly for specific problems, some not at all, one or two are going to be scraped when I get time.

Building a shop can become a goal.

It's wise to avoid that goal, since one presumes you have something you want to do with it, and you don't want to be that guy..... the one who keels over dead the day after he gets his nice new shop, the one that finally he will do great things in, finished. At least I do not want to be that guy.

That said, I buy interesting tools when I find them. Most of them have been used at least a few times by now. I got into scraping when I happened on some scrapers and blades, and knew they could be handy

Paul Alciatore
10-06-2016, 09:59 PM
I am going through the same process: moving my shop and setting up the new one. It has been going on for some time now and I am tired of it. I want to start using it.

So, NO I am not enjoying setting the shop up more than using it. I want to use it.

I still have many things sitting in boxes that I have to move stuff to even get to. One more item to finish (a top for a workbench) and then I plan to do start doing some projects that have been too long delayed.

JRouche
10-06-2016, 11:49 PM
I am sorry I didnt get to read all the replies. Very slow reader. But I get what you are saying David. I am very similar.

Not in the machinist part mind you!! I am terrible. I mean the Shop right! And of course the contents.

My tools have always been my passion, to a very scary place with obsession I have come to grow into it.

I have my tools now. Now what?

So YES! Some of do tinker with tools. If you get a sec check out my blown up boring head (post). Bypass the article and look for the boring head. Fixed it up great, mine also needed repair.

Slimming down is what naturally happens, unless you have a nice ranch or farm (read jealousy).

Do what makes you happy, and keep WD-40 available in 5 gallon cans if need be, it is here.

Thanks for sharing, now go fix that whatchamacallit, thingamajig, doohickey you were thinking about fixing.. JR

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/threads/29244-Wohlhaupter-explosion

BCRider
10-07-2016, 01:16 AM
I think a lot of us that posted to this thread need to band together to form a support group. And I'm only partially joking....

This winter marks the first winter where I don't really have much left to do other than the small bits and pieces. So my hope is to use the shops to build a couple of proper pieces of furniture for the house and to do some gunsmithing projects. I've got an 1866 Yellow Boy Uberti that needs some care as well as a couple of 100 year old single shot "boy's" rifles that need drilling out and sleeving to spruce up the bores. And if there's time I might just build a model airplane or make a flame licker engine.

That's my "Fall Resolution" aimed at actually USING my shops. Anyone else?

fixerdave
10-07-2016, 02:35 AM
I think a lot of us that posted to this thread need to band together to form a support group. And I'm only partially joking... That's my "Fall Resolution" aimed at actually USING my shops. Anyone else?

My shop is a place to maintain my sanity. I have a literally endless list of things I'm supposed to do. Yes, I am married. The more I do, the longer the list. I stupidly add to that list myself all the time. That list doesn't go away, but I've discovered that ignoring it once in a while is... really, really nice.

So, when I have to, I go to my shop to get something done. But, on the days when things aren't quite so pressing, on those fleeting days where I can actually choose what I want to do, I'm now reminding myself that the reason I have a shop is to make me happy. Feeling like I need a support group to force myself into finishing projects is not making me happy. On the other hand, if blowing an afternoon making a whatyoumacallit to attach to my lathe so I can accomplish some task that I'll probably never need to do makes me happy. Well, then... that's why I have a shop, right?

I have no idea why spinning knobs while hot swarf is flying about makes me happy, but it does, at least for now. Whatever... so long as the addiction doesn't get so bad that I end up walking to the autoparts store, again, then I'm just going to enjoy those bits of my life where I can.

I admit it, I'm an addict. And I like it :p

David...

ikdor
10-07-2016, 07:23 AM
Like many things in life, it more about the journey than about the destination and building your shop capabilities is a journey indeed. It's almost like there's a gene in some men that makes them want to collect "capabilities" to tackle future needs, and that's driving the need for a fully equipped shop.
I enjoy thinking of how to build something more than the actual building and can easily spend hours thinking of how I would build a CNC mill from scratch. I don't have a clear idea however what I would machine with it.....
Even though I spend very little time building stuff, I thoroughly enjoy it when I (or my wife) need a task/chore/repair and can finish it with the tools I have on hand.

Igor

Carm
10-07-2016, 08:18 AM
"I enjoy thinking of how to build something more than the actual building and can easily spend hours thinking of how I would build a CNC mill from scratch."

This reminded me of a POW in Japan, WWII.
As a means of preserving his sanity, he designed a house of brick that would be built if he ever got back.
All in his head, knew the total number of bricks, in the thousands.
He was there for several years, so he changed the design a couple times, and again knew how many bricks.
He wasn't a mason BTW.
After the war he built the house.

MrSleepy
10-07-2016, 08:34 AM
This reminded me of a POW in Japan, WWII.

True story : As prisoners of the Japanese , some British troops building the infamous railway Burma railway were taught Korean by their officer , to keep up moral. When the war was over , one of the troops mentioned to the officer that he was going to go to Korea to try out what he'd learnt. A this point the officer admitted that he had'nt taught them Korean ... he'd made the whole thing up.

Mr Fixit
10-07-2016, 09:51 AM
Quote from Igor,

"Even though I spend very little time building stuff, I thoroughly enjoy it when I (or my wife) need a task/chore/repair and can finish it with the tools I have on hand."


This is exactly how I feel about my shop at this time. I lived in a house to 28yrs raising the family without any garage, just a small closet that I kept all my tools as a new husband, father, home owner, it worked but got pretty crowded. 6yrs ago we moved, I built my dream shop, the same size footprint :) as the house we moved into. I have amassed the stuff I felt belongs, or I wanted to get to make it a shop. I'm like fasttrack a gokart was always in my dreams to own. I've not gotten there (go kart) yet, but along the way I'm learning a whole new world of things from many places, including here where the knowledge is fantastic. I'm stuck like Mr Powell because the goals of my project's are seemingly just beyond what I feel is my comfort zone or should I say my self confidence.
I've also fallen into the hole of what do I really want to use this big shop for beyond the mrfixit as my name implies.
Maybe a online subforum here for therapy would be good for us who need it.
In conclusion I couldn't be any happier with what I've created, it's just putting it to what I feel is the proper use is still a bit of a challenge I'm working on.

TX
Mr fixit for the family
Chris. :)

strokersix
10-07-2016, 10:00 AM
Wow. I am not alone!

I find the best way to develop my shop is to use it. This naturally results in the means to accomplish whatever I am doing and the shop evolves simultaneously.

kendall
10-07-2016, 10:09 AM
I'm the same way with pretty much everything. Not all shop related, I've lost track of the car, truck, motorcycle and boat projects I've finished only to sit back and say 'Now what?' and trade them off for another project. As mentioned, it's the journey not the destination, for me it's almost a let down when I finish. 2 months ago I finished a small catamaran style pedal powered fishing boat, used it twice and had a new design started before I traded it off.

wdtom44
10-07-2016, 10:53 AM
I got started with machine tools because I wanted to be able to fix and make things. Tractors, log splitter, antique equipment, etc. So far I haven't done any strictly hobby projects. But the interest is right there when making something for something that is actually needed. Just the other day I made washers that go on the end of an oil filter. The replacement had the central tube flared out larger at the ends so the stock washers would not contact the gasket sealing surface outside of the flare dia. The washers had to be recessed to clear the flare, and for a spring, didn't take long but what would we have done without the lathe? Could you enjoy fixing up a garden tractor and implements? I have done and am doing one of these too, lots of place to make bushings, oversize pins, etc. to tighten things up? And you have a useful machine when done. I have had plans for a Gattling Gun for years, would like to try it, but there is too much other stuff that I haven't got to yet. I have an Economy Power King tractor in the shed I bought that may run but is partly apart and needs a complete going through. These are the sort of projects I find interesting, and keep me interested.

pinstripe
10-07-2016, 11:13 AM
This has been an interesting thread. I only bought a lathe and mill this year even though I have been tinkering most of my life. Pretty much everyone who has seen them has asked why I bought/need them. There is no logical justification. I bought them because I would like to learn some new skills and enjoy the capabilities the skills and machines give me. I'm glad to hear that I'm not the only crazy one!

firbikrhd1
10-07-2016, 11:37 AM
Outside influences in one's life can make huge changes in one's interests. The death of a spouse, divorce, death of other family members, financial losses, health changes and more, all can affect mood, interests and evoke mild forms of depression without one even realizing it is occurring. For instance, I am one who used to love to fish the flats. After a very nasty divorce I haven't been interested in my boat or fishing for over 15 years, and my rotten ex didn't even participate in my fishing hobby which I developed years before we met. Why the change? I really have no idea. I don't believe it to be depression, after 10 years of single life I remarried to a wonderful woman and couldn't be happier. We have numerous common interests as well as individual interests, and it all works just fine.
The point is that major life changes can cause major interest changes for some reason, and the two don't even need to be related. No doubt there is a psychologist out there that can explain the cause, but the most important thing isn't the cause it's that you still have interests and a zest for life. Nothing says you won;t come back to machining one day, any more than anything says I won't go back to finding flats fishing appealing. I've kept my boat for that very reason, and the reality that I couldn't get what I paid for it in any case. It's there if and when I want it. When it becomes a burden I'll rid myself of it.

BCRider
10-07-2016, 12:20 PM
.... It's the journey, not the destination.....

Truth be told this is a big part of it for me as well. And while I don't have anything stressful in my life which I need to escape from I do enjoy just being in the shop and building things. It may be a project or it may be a some bit of tooling for the machine shop or wood shop. But the key is that it's time in the shop and using the skills I've learned that I enjoy.

J Tiers
10-07-2016, 01:17 PM
.... Pretty much everyone who has seen them has asked why I bought/need them. ....

That "need" question.....

I always tell people that they do not NEED anything but food and water, plus clothes if the climate is colder. Everything else is a "want", and not a "need". That generally shuts them up.

fixerdave
10-07-2016, 01:40 PM
That "need" question.....

I always tell people that they do not NEED anything but food and water, plus clothes if the climate is colder. Everything else is a "want", and not a "need". That generally shuts them up.

My answer... "well, I know a guy that collects petrified shark's teeth." At least I can do something with my hobby, if it ever came down to it. Besides... how many people that collect stamps do it to mail letters? Are people that restore classic cars required to commute to work with them? It's a hobby. Get over it.

Why does the guy that buys a painting get to prattle on about how it is "a piece of art that features a harmonious balanced design, practiced illusionism and church rhetoric" (first google hit... whatever) but I have to explain what practical thing this exquisitely crafted and harmoniously balanced wrench is supposed to "do." Whack them upside the head might come to mind.

Honestly, every piece fits into a collection of capabilities, and sometimes I try to explain how the various things work together to accomplish something. But, whatever... it's like trying to explain to me why they collect stamps.

David...

softtail
10-07-2016, 01:58 PM
This must be related to why I have a burning desire to get an old Jeep/Willy's 'project' vehicle (had a few in past). It will need to have jaw dropping off road capabilities... even though I would likely rarely if ever take it off road. Can't shake it. Ill suited to family life, unsafe, bottomless money pit, no place to put it, don't want to insure it, don't want to store it... but damn I may die if I don't get one.

kendall
10-07-2016, 03:03 PM
Gotta laugh at your off-road project, I've always been a fan of trail rides, hill climbing and mud runs, but haven't had a serious off-road truck since I traded off my Willys 2a years ago.
At the rear of my property there's a swampy area about 75x500 ft, every time I'm back there I find myself planning routes through it and figuring out how 'good' the truck would have to be. Also, on the way to my mother's house if taking the back roads, there's a heavily overgrown side street with a sign that say 'road is impassible', every time I see it I think I'd like to see why....

Different custom work on cars, trucks and motorcycles is what got me into machining in the first place. I used to pay to have parts made up or modified, then one day I took a good look at how much I was paying for even minor projects, and decided to learn machining.

Baz
10-07-2016, 05:29 PM
In a similar vein, on another forum, someone mentioned that people start out making a cnc machine to help with their xyz hobby needs and end up with CNC itself being their hobby. I started looking at cnc again a couple of weeks ago and it is taking up a lot of my time..........please send a search and rescue squad to cnczone after Xmas.

J Tiers
10-07-2016, 07:47 PM
In a similar vein, on another forum, someone mentioned that people start out making a cnc machine to help with their xyz hobby needs and end up with CNC itself being their hobby. I started looking at cnc again a couple of weeks ago and it is taking up a lot of my time..........please send a search and rescue squad to cnczone after Xmas.

Some manage to make a business out of things they like to do. If nothing else, it may cure the "like to do" part of it....... If you get decent at setting up CNC, you can maybe do "cnc consulting" for similar folks.

Trouble is, those pesky independent hobby type folks don't much like to PAY for such services, they will muddle along by themselves. I'd do a side biz in machine repair, IF it would pay, but it most likely would NOT. Businesses buy another and scrap the old one, hobby folks use it as-is, or attempt their own repairs.