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MikeL46
11-08-2016, 07:13 PM
Many years ago my wife and I enjoyed the movie 'The Graduate'

We just watched it again - disgusting! The 'hero' is a lying, cheating stalker. We couldn't understand what we saw the first time.

FYI - I'm 70

Mike

danlb
11-08-2016, 08:08 PM
Yeah, it's funny how that happens.

I watched "This property is condemned" yesterday ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/This_Property_Is_Condemned )

It's a 1966 movie set in during the Great Depression, adapted from the 1946 one-act play of the same name by Tennessee Williams.

As I watched it, I was astounded by the cavalier way that the women were harassed by the men (often drunk) of the town. The men were depicted as crude and macho. The women were all weak and swooning over their men.

When I saw this as a young man, I was amazed that people lived such exotic lives. Now I'm amazed at how crass and abusive the characters were.

brian Rupnow
11-08-2016, 08:15 PM
Every so often I get a hankering for a good old western. then I watch a John Wayne movie, and think "Oh my god---How hokey". Same with reruns of old Bonanza shows.--And yet, 40 years ago they were so good-----Same with a lot of books. Ray Bradbury was my hero when I was in high school. The Martian Chronicles was the best collection of short sci-fi stories ever.--I have tried to read them now, and I can't imagine why I ever thought they were so good.

darryl
11-08-2016, 08:16 PM
I watched Easy Rider when it first came out, then again about 20 years later. Same thing.

When we were young, watching a movie was more of an experience. Now it's old hat and we're trying to get something critical out of it- and in many cases it isn't there.

danlb
11-08-2016, 09:58 PM
Every so often I get a hankering for a good old western. then I watch a John Wayne movie, and think "Oh my god---How hokey". Same with reruns of old Bonanza shows.--And yet, 40 years ago they were so good-----Same with a lot of books. Ray Bradbury was my hero when I was in high school. The Martian Chronicles was the best collection of short sci-fi stories ever.--I have tried to read them now, and I can't imagine why I ever thought they were so good.

As a life long Sci-fi fan, I was thrilled to hear that Mr Bradbury was doing a local book signing. Alas, I owned none of his books since I used the library extensively during the period whern I read all of his books.

When I got to the book store, there was one Bradbury title left, and not one of my favorites. I was crestfallen when I made it to the head of the line and found the great man was dressed in burmuda shorts, unshaven with what looked like bed-head for a hair style.

I was so shaken that all I could blurt was "Love your work." as he signed the book.

I've stopped re-reading the old classics. I hate the disappointment.


Dan

tlfamm
11-08-2016, 10:14 PM
In my twenties, I thought one of the most gripping films I had ever seen was "Wages of Fear", involving the transport of nitroglycerin on mountain roads to ultimately extinguish an oil-well fire. Twenty years later I purchased the DVD and played it for my family.

Every last one of us fell asleep, myself included. What happened?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Wages_of_Fear

achtanelion
11-08-2016, 11:04 PM
I feel lucky. Just the other day I watched hot shots part Deux again and still laughed myself sick at the chicken arrow. I guess I'm still as childish as ever. :-)

Doc Nickel
11-08-2016, 11:09 PM
Going with a not-quite-as-antiquated example ( :D ) I recently had the chance to rewatch some old episodes of Cheers.

I used to love Cheers when it was on TV, as a young kid. Loved the back-and-forth banter between Cliff and Norm, the insults from Carla, etc.

But rewatching it today? I cannot stand it. I literally can't make it through a whole episode because of the absurdly stupid situations Sam and Diane got into, the pointless lying, etc.

If the episode has mostly back-and-forth between Carla and Diane, or Cliff and Norm, or Norm and Woody, etc. No problem. If it's another lover's spat between Sam and Diane, it's unwatchable. It grates on my nerves like a chalkboard.

Doc.

john hobdeclipe
11-08-2016, 11:15 PM
It's not just movies and books, it's music, too. Back in the days of my youth I listened to, and bought, the "underground" music of the times. I listened to "Subterranean Circus" on WCFL among other little known AM radio shows. And I thought this was the deepest, most intellectual music ever recorded. I bought albums by "Rotary Connection", "Cat Mother and the All Night Newsboys", and others, along with "Switched on Bach", "Chopin a la Moog", etc. It was so hip and so groovy, back then.

I still have many of these albums and/or the CD releases. I play them from time to time and think "How trite, how empty, how silly and pointless."

It may have something to do with growing up, although that's something I've steadfastly (and somewhat successfully) resisted though the years.

Yet I even today love "Track In A" by Cat Mother & the All Night Newsboys. Perhaps there's still hope for my soul.

DS_park
11-08-2016, 11:31 PM
Saw the Graduate for the first time last year. Similar reaction to the OP.

Blazing Saddles however still stands the test of time. I doubt they would be allowed to film it today though.

Airplane holds up well to.

Doc Nickel
11-09-2016, 12:01 AM
Blazing Saddles however still stands the test of time. I doubt they would be allowed to film it today though.

-Horsesh*t. :)

I've heard the same phrase used a lot even today- that "they" wouldn't allow it to be made nowadays.

Wait, what? What, exactly, is groundbreaking, edge-pushing or pradigm-redefining in Blazing Saddles, today? The word 'ni**er'? Watch anything by Spike Lee, or featuring Samuel L. Jackson, or anything featuring a modern rapper, and you'll hear that word four dozen times just in the first reel.

The unthinkable concept of having a black man in a position of power?

If you tried to remake the same movie today, the only thing that would even be remotely controversial might be Mongo's punching of the horse- the animal rights activists would be up in arms about that, but since almost no one listens to them anymore, that would hardly be an issue.

Yes, it's still a great film, a classic. And yes, it was cutting edge... in 1974.

There are far worse things in movies and TV today. How about Dexter? A TV show about a serial killer, presented as the killer being the "good guy". Or Breaking Bad, a TV show about illegal drug dealing on an industrial scale- and the drug dealer is presented as a good guy gone wrong. The Lord of the Rings movies showed-graphically- limbs being chopped off, people being violently decapitated, and stabbed or run through with spears. I made the mistake of wathcing a movie called "Scary Movie", which was a parody of other horror movies. In one scene, a woman is blasted up to, and adhered to, the ceiling by her lovers' ejaculate.

What's Blazing Saddles have? A Jewish guy playing an Indian and speaking in Yiddish? Some lady singing in a bad German accent? Some old coot on a roof trying to yell the N-word? A black guy briefly smoking some weed?

The horror. :)

Doc.

lynnl
11-09-2016, 12:22 AM
There's a lesson to be learned here... life is just a passing fad.

We recently acquired a DVD set of the Peter Sellers Pink Panther series. Back when new those were non-stop laughter. Watched the first one a few months back, with visiting daughter and son in law, and none of us ever cracked a smile.

Now the Andy Griffith (Mayberry) reruns with Barney Fife, however, do seem timeless.

enginuity
11-09-2016, 12:38 AM
Time is something that forges true classics.

Some movies I think hold up well (and there are many others)

Dr Strangelove
Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid
The Right Stuff
Ben-Hur (1959)

For books I agree with the Ray Bradbury thoughts. I read his Fahrenheit 451 in high school and liked it. I've reread it and don't care for it.

George Orwell's 1984 on the other hand is timeless.

dave_r
11-09-2016, 01:00 AM
I still like all the old mystery/detective movies, like the Thin Man series, The Shadow ones, movies like that. And the Monty Python films stand the test of time. Don't make me throw the Holy Handgrenade!

Black Forest
11-09-2016, 01:15 AM
Any of you ever watch Fury on Saturday mornings when you were a kid? I did EVERY Saturday. I had mentioned to our daughter what a great show it was so she bought me a DVD set as a present recently. Although somewhat hokey I still liked watching the shows. But not obsessed like I was when a kid.

Brian Rupinow you should be ashamed of yourself calling any John Wayne movie hokey.......that just ain't right man! :cool:

The movie The Sting is still a good movie I think. With Robert Redford and Paul Newman.

wierdscience
11-09-2016, 01:37 AM
And yet there are some movies that are timeless.How many here will watch a Clint Eastwood western,or the Blues Brothers,even though they have seen them 20 times? Some old moves are still relevant and IMO it's because they really were ahead of their time.

DancingBear
11-09-2016, 07:22 AM
Tastes definitely change as we grow older.

But our memories change too. We remember the parts we liked and forget the parts we didn't. For example, the "classic rock" of the 1970's is still enormously popular, and I often hear people talk about how much better the music was back then. But what people forget is that the classic rock stations only play about 10% of what was played on the radio in the '70's. If everyone had to listen to all the disco, Shawn Cassidy, Barry Manilow and Debbie Boone we had to endure back in the day they wouldn't be so impressed.

And yeah, some John Wayne movies aren't so great. But I still enjoy Big Jake and The Shootist.

Walt

AD5MB
11-09-2016, 07:39 AM
in central NM, surrounded by Dine ( what the Navajo were called before the Spanish called them thief ) John Wayne is detested. That line about "The only good Indian..." hit home.

I harass a coworker about a documentary about a person from his home state; a Guy named Walker Texas Ranger. every Texan uses the spinning high kick as his primary form of communication. spinning high kick to the temple, "Hello". spinning high kick to the kidneys, "do you want fries with that?" did you ever see the episode where the hot blonde DA got kidnapped? no, wait - did you ever see any episode where the hot blonde DA was not kidnapped?

I think it was the edginess that made those movies interesting back then. the edge has passed, and now they are just yesterdays news. nothing new about "Some like it hot" today.

anent music: there were tracks that were musically good but not commercial. I have never heard "Graveyard train" by CCR on the radio. you get the former top 40, not the best or the worst, but the most likely to be lip synced to.

classic rock stations are very stingy with Stevie Wonder and forgot all about the Temptations. Rick Derringers "Rock and Roll Hootchie Koo" is unmistakably classic rock, and rare as frog hair. you would think rock was a lily white phenomenon.

brian Rupnow
11-09-2016, 07:49 AM
I still like the old music. Every song ever sang is available by typing in the name of the song and youtube in your search engine. Generally a video of the artist that sang the song. Sometimes I set downstairs in my office and have my own private 1960's rock concert!!!

George Seal
11-09-2016, 08:37 AM
Brian
I don't have a downstairs office
BUT
I do have head phones

72 years whatever
I still like music from 50's 60's 70's
not much there after

boslab
11-09-2016, 08:39 AM
I saw Mel Gibson in " life stinks" again the other day, still funny
Mark

RHayes
11-09-2016, 08:39 AM
I recently watched Crocodile Dundee for the second time and still liked it. A nice blend of love story, adventure, and comedy all rapped up in one. Never saw the follow up but don't think it was as popular.

AD5MB
11-09-2016, 08:42 AM
Every song ever sang is available by typing in the name of the song and youtube in your search engine.

I have some old reel to reels. bought them to erase and re use. discovered great but unknown rock and roll on them. nobody I have encountered can identify any of it. google searches bring up bupkis.

three lesson learned about reel to reels:

you can record 5 albums on a reel to reel. don't record 5 albums of the same band. you will have had your fill by the time the third album ends

at 3 3/4 IPS ( inches per second to you young folk ) the reel to reel sounds just like the albums, minus the cymbals.

you must record Gilbert O'Sullivans one hit wonder "Alone again ( naturally )" from an LP. It just does not sound right without scratch, pop, tick, hiss.

Seastar
11-09-2016, 09:24 AM
Re the pops and clicks from an LP.
I have a collection of about 1000 LPs from the 50s to the 70s. Lots of swing era recordings.
I can't listen to CDs of the same recordings because they just don't sound right.
I play my LPs on a homemade Heathkit Willamson tube amplifier that adds that "tube" sound.
Old movies bore me unless they are one or two of the classics or Clint Eastwood.
By the way, if you like old LPs you can buy lots of them at Goodwill stores.
I have hundreds I have purchased there, most for $1 or less.
Bill

sasquatch
11-09-2016, 09:36 AM
I never watch any movies,, it is all phony fiction. Same with reading, i read a lot , but ONLY non fiction. Haven't watched TV in maybe 30+ years.

malbenbut
11-09-2016, 10:03 AM
Years ago when I was a kid I used to watch 30s movies staring James Cagney, Humphrey Boggart Edward G etc. They were good films then and when I've seen them again recently and was able to understand the dialog I realised how good they were.
some things get better with age.
"Look Ma I'm on top of the world."

MBB

QSIMDO
11-09-2016, 10:50 AM
Many of my remaining old friends are uncomfortable with my philosophy of " this moment is all I have and the only moment of importance".

I have absolutely no desire to join the VFW and constantly re-live my military experience.
Yes, I do "remember the time..." but it's gone now and I'm hopefully wiser.
No, I DON'T "remember the time" because I was stoned, drunk, tripping, etc. and I am DEFINITELY wiser.
Movies and TV are just fantasy...someone else's fantasy...and they're getting rich and having their own real-life experiences off exploitation.

What was, was...what is, is.

SteveF
11-09-2016, 11:54 AM
-Horsesh*t. :)

............................

What's Blazing Saddles have? A Jewish guy playing an Indian and speaking in Yiddish? Some lady singing in a bad German accent? Some old coot on a roof trying to yell the N-word? A black guy briefly smoking some weed?

The horror. :)

Doc.

Your memory is fading. Let me refresh your memory of the last 3 minutes. IIRC Dom DeLuise's line as the director was: "OK, watch me. Faggots."

No, that movie could not be made today.

Steve

From the wonders of the Internet: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JMK6lzmSk2o

Jon Leary
11-09-2016, 12:09 PM
I never watch any movies,, it is all phony fiction. Same with reading, i read a lot , but ONLY non fiction. Haven't watched TV in maybe 30+ years.
I am with you on that. I can't figure out why so many people think they are supposed to get some deep meaning from movies. I do watch some tv but most of it is garbage.

J Tiers
11-09-2016, 12:31 PM
A movie is a story about something that didn't happen, so it's a lie, it's not true. A movie "stars" people who are paid to impersonate people who never existed, and to tell lies.....

And you PAY for that?

Wow..

Yes bad attitude, and I don't actually quite have that opinion, but, when you boil it down to the essence, that's about what it is.....

Fasttrack
11-09-2016, 02:02 PM
A movie is a story about something that didn't happen, so it's a lie, it's not true. A movie "stars" people who are paid to impersonate people who never existed, and to tell lies.....

And you PAY for that?

Wow..

Yes bad attitude, and I don't actually quite have that opinion, but, when you boil it down to the essence, that's about what it is.....

I went through a phase where I thought like that (and I still don't understand why movie/television actors are "celebrities") but it's a little ridiculous to pass judgment on people for paying money for ENTERTAINMENT. Whether it's sports, television, music, movies, fireworks, muscle cars, model steam engines, etc., people spend money on things that entertain and flavor their lives.

For a lot of folks here, our interests lie in other directions but choosing to make my own can opener, for instance, is as much a frivolous pursuit as sitting down to watch a movie.


Edit:
Times do change us. I remember thinking Airplane was hilarious when I saw it in middle school. Now I can't even get halfway through it before I'm bored stupid. I still like listening to Richard Diamond radio programs while I'm working, though.

sch
11-09-2016, 02:28 PM
Never cottened much to Bradbury, or Asimov for that matter but The Economist did have a good obituary: http://www.economist.com/node/21557294

Evan
11-09-2016, 03:18 PM
I haven't watched a movie in quite a few years, I don't watch television either and haven't for about 25 years. However, I do have another reason that most people don't have. I have prosopagnosia, also known as "face blindness", the inability to remember faces. Mine is bad enough that I cannot identify the characters in the movies or TV shows unless it is something like Star Trek or Star Wars, which I do like. Not being able to recognize the characters makes it hard to follow the plot in most cases. Shows like The Matrix are a nice exception. The old Westerns are also fairly easy because of the heavy stereotyping. I did enjoy watching the movie I was in, The Thirteenth Warrior. At least I can recognize myself.

That is me on the left with the real beard:

http://ixian.ca/pics12/13W.jpg

gambler
11-09-2016, 03:29 PM
a couple of weeks ago I reread Last of the Mohicans. still loved it 40 years later. I don't generally read fiction though.

Willy
11-09-2016, 03:46 PM
"Firsts" are always the best because we have no preconceived notions or expectations. Whether it's the first time riding a bike, driving a car or that first date. After the first of anything it's all old news after that initial experience.

Think back to all the movies one has seen since you saw that epic film 20-40 years ago, never mind all life's little treasures you've been exposed to. You are much more sophisticated in taste at this level so don't be surprised that you aren't in awe by watching the same movie again. Reminds me of a guy I know that married the same woman 3 times! I'll bet there were no surprises after the first round.

I don't personally watch movies anymore, but watching the same one, even if I liked it the first time, just doesn't work for me.
Some things in life are best done only once.

PStechPaul
11-09-2016, 07:46 PM
For music, I like mostly classic rock from 60's to 70's, but also some from the 50's and a few more contemporary hits, and blues. I also enjoy some C&W and Bluegrass, and most forms of classical except Opera (which ranks barely above Rap). I am now listening to the Classic Rock cable channel of "Music Choice". They do play some more obscure cuts that I have rarely, if ever, heard elsewhere. Most of the songs never seem to get stale, and they often remind me of times in my life that were eventful and mostly pleasant.

I still enjoy movies, particularly the true classics, even when I've seen them before. I, too, have trouble remembering faces and names, so plots are sometimes confusing. I confess to watching way too much TV, mostly crime dramas like NCIS, CSI, Law and Order, Chicago Fire, etc, but the plots seem to be getting ever more extreme, predictable, and unlikely. Usually I am on my computer doing stuff while watching and listening only to some extent. Newer comedies seem particularly uninspired and "goofy", and the so-called "reality" shows are the pits.

I don't really need much "entertainment". I enjoy being with nature, interacting with the real world outside, and also pursuing various challenging electronic and mechanical projects, as well as sometimes playing music on my guitar. The best books and shows are those that are factual or have strong basis in fact or reasonably plausible fiction. I'm not much interested in "science fantasy" involving zombies, demons, wizards, sorcerers, monsters, and such.

brian Rupnow
11-09-2016, 08:43 PM
The only television I watch on a regular basis is the Jeapardy game show and the news. My wife and I tend to revolve in separate orbits but we make it a point to watch Jeapardy together each evening. I still enjoy science fiction novels, but it is becoming harder and harder to find good authors. One of my favourite detective book authors, John Sandford, who writes the "Prey" series has recently co-authored a sci-fi book called "Saturn Run" and it is quite sensational. Andy Weir did a great job with "The Martian". For fantasy, Robin Hobb has no equal, and I thoroughly enjoy Diana Gabaldon's work on the "Outlander" series.

DR
11-10-2016, 10:34 AM
Old TV comedy shows with canned laughter made me want to smash the TV to bits. Surprisingly, some new shows still use canned laughter.

Arcane
11-10-2016, 11:46 AM
Our brains crave and possible have an absolute need for stimulation and "entertainment" provides that stimulation during times when we have no necessary work to do.

After we've done what's necessary during the day we don't just sit in the dark until we get sleepy and go to bed, do we? Generally we would consider anyone who did that to have mental health issues. We do something to busy ourselves and often it's something that requires no real physical activity, just sitting there watching something happen or listening to music or reading and what most people don't realize is that we don't consciously chose what that something is.

We know that we either like it or not but that's a reaction. Our deep subconscious is what does the choosing.

So even though we all likely have looked at someone's favourite pastime or even our own at an earlier age and thought "What a waste of time!", remember that they had no real choice of pastime...just as you had no real choice either.

J Tiers
11-10-2016, 11:58 AM
I went through a phase where I thought like that (and I still don't understand why movie/television actors are "celebrities") but it's a little ridiculous to pass judgment on people for paying money for ENTERTAINMENT. Whether it's sports, television, music, movies, fireworks, muscle cars, model steam engines, etc., people spend money on things that entertain and flavor their lives.
....

I don't "think like that", although most movies bore me, especially when I see where the plot is going, and have to sit through the rest of the laborious plot development.

It's just a somewhat funny-amusing way to look at the whole business. People pay to be lied to and to see things which they will never do in their boring lives, but think that they would kind of like to do, maybe. Watching others take the risks you don't take.

Engineers have a different way of taking risks... when you do things that are new and you have not done before, or maybe nobody has done before. Very cool when you get away with it.

Maybe that is the main motive behind self-driving cars, AI, etc, etc, all the stuff that threatens to turn everything upside down. Basically due to folks who can't stand not doing something that looks as if it should be difficult, but possible. Very much like mountain climbing, actually. And it's not you that dies if you mess up.

Then there are the folks who seem to live on those magazines about movie stars and their lives.... it's whole other level of "living through others".

Fasttrack
11-10-2016, 01:43 PM
Maybe that is the main motive behind self-driving cars, AI, etc, etc, all the stuff that threatens to turn everything upside down. Basically due to folks who can't stand not doing something that looks as if it should be difficult, but possible. Very much like mountain climbing, actually. And it's not you that dies if you mess up.



I think that is very much the motive behind self-driving cars, etc. That's what drives me in my career and I love the idea of self-driving cars... it's not that I don't see all the faults that people have brought up on this forum but I just love the challenge of it.

J Tiers
11-10-2016, 02:12 PM
I understand....

I am similar, but most of my various technology areas have not been as potentially disruptive, or at least not in the same way. (Music equipment, alternative energy)

Evan
11-10-2016, 02:39 PM
Written by Paul: I don't really need much "entertainment". I enjoy being with nature, interacting with the real world outside, and also pursuing various challenging electronic and mechanical projects, as well as sometimes playing music on my guitar. The best books and shows are those that are factual or have strong basis in fact or reasonably plausible fiction. I'm not much interested in "science fantasy" involving zombies, demons, wizards, sorcerers, monsters, and such.

Precisely the same for me except I have a keyboard. My fingers are too sensitive to play a guitar. While I very much like science fiction I only like the "real" thing, where it contains extensions of known science. I will say that being an extra in a movie was one of the most entertaining things I have ever done and they even paid me to do it. I can fully understand how people get hooked on "Hollywood".

Doc Nickel
11-10-2016, 02:48 PM
Your memory is fading. Let me refresh your memory of the last 3 minutes. IIRC Dom DeLuise's line as the director was: "OK, watch me. Faggots."

-A word used in at least three relatively recent Quentin Tarantino movies that I'm aware of, just off the top of my head. And in those cases, said as an actual insult, not as a camp gag.

Blazing Saddles is a tame PG-13 movie today, mostly only because of the N-word.

By contrast, one of the most popular movies this past summer, Deadpool, was a full-on R, and featured a character sawing off his own hand (complete with gore and blood spray) getting shot in the butt, a motorcycle rider getting messily decapitated when his bike crashes, and a gratuitous number of slow-motion and up-close scenes of both the entry and exit wounds of people being shot in the head. The movie also features an extended and graphic sex scene- or rather, series of sex scenes- that show pretty much everything except the actual engorged portions.

And that was after the studio cut a quarter of the budget, since they were afraid it was going to tank.

It went on to earn almost a billion dollars and a sequel is already in the works.

Compared to that, Blazing Saddles is just another episode of Mr Roger's Neighborhood.

Doc.

Evan
11-10-2016, 02:59 PM
Well said Doc. I for one am not the least bit interested in watching gratuitous violence. It serves no purpose in life and can only make it worse. I have already seen enough of the real thing including six teenagers with only half a body left.

Toolguy
11-10-2016, 03:57 PM
Two of the movies I still enjoy are Three Amigos and Young Dr. Frankenstein. They were both very well done with a lot of satire, innuendo and comedy.

Mcgyver
11-10-2016, 06:11 PM
Blazing Saddles however still stands the test of time. I doubt they would be allowed to film it today though.
.

pretty much anything with farts in it will stand the test of time.

I'm protective of my reading bandwidth....so much crap out there, and lets face it, what we want to be is absolutists not relativists when it comes to reading material (ie read really great stuff, not just great because everyone is reading or we're 23). Have been reading a lot of classics lately, the cheap and almost guaranteed well worth it - going with the safe absolute lol

As for video, imo TV has gotten a lot better if you restrict viewing to the better done 1 hour dramas. They're movie quality with 10 hours to develop story plot and characters, vs movies at 1.5. Frankly its a rare movie that interests me anymore, 99% are done to 1 of 5 Hollywood clichés. Maybe just getting old and grumpy, but movies imo are a product whose quality is in decline

Seastar
11-10-2016, 07:17 PM
I haven't watched a movie in quite a few years, I don't watch television either and haven't for about 25 years. However, I do have another reason that most people don't have. I have prosopagnosia, also known as "face blindness", the inability to remember faces. Mine is bad enough that I cannot identify the characters in the movies or TV shows unless it is something like Star Trek or Star Wars, which I do like. Not being able to recognize the characters makes it hard to follow the plot in most cases. Shows like The Matrix are a nice exception. The old Westerns are also fairly easy because of the heavy stereotyping. I did enjoy watching the movie I was in, The Thirteenth Warrior. At least I can recognize myself.

That is me on the left with the real beard:

http://ixian.ca/pics12/13W.jpg
And how did that happen?
We want to know!
Bill

Evan
11-10-2016, 08:29 PM
A part of the movie was filmed only 30 klics from where I lived for nearly 40 years. At the time I worked for Xerox Corp and looked after all the temporary gear they had in their office and in the "Circus", the near set offices a short helicopter flight from the actual set. They did a casting call in Williams Lake so I attended and was selected to act as a knife maker and seller. There is a lot I have written about it so you can read it here. It was also published as a three part series in the local newspaper.

http://crazywolf.com/extra.htm


BTW, my server is getting a bit overloaded. I have it set to a max of 50 connections at once. So, if you can't get a connection just wait a few minutes. I can set it higher but then it makes it harder for me to connect.

I also think that my ISP heavily restricts connections via FTP. They aren't supposed to do that but I am sure they do. I never have these problems with the primary provider, the phone company, but I can't get that type of access where I am now. I go through what is mainly the TV cable supplier, SHAW, and they intentionally limit bandwidth on FTP I am sure.

Mcgyver
11-10-2016, 09:05 PM
And how did that happen?


the call for extras went out for hairy guys in a bathrobe :D

jmarkwolf
11-11-2016, 10:39 AM
When I was about 4 years old, circa 1960 or so, I was just getting to the point where I would go to sleep without needing a light on (monsters under the bed and such).

We went to visit some family in Detroit and my older cousins and I went to a neighborhood Saturday matinee and saw "House on Haunted Hill". After that, I needed the light on to go to sleep for a good while longer.

After I was married, I watched it with my wife, for the first time since I was 4.

We kept waiting for the scary parts. When the movie was over my wife turned to me and exclaimed "well, maybe the credits are really scary"! :)

Evan
11-11-2016, 01:37 PM
Not exactly a bathrobe...

http://ixian.ca/pics12/vikng7th.jpg

If they had caught me with a camera I would have been kicked off the set instantly. I happened to have a very tiny 35mm camera that I hid in my vehicle on the seat so I went over one day just after having dressed and quickly snapped this pic. The camera was still sitting on the seat which is why the angle is so low. They are super fussy about no pictures of any sort being taken of anything to do with the filming in any way. The actual set was down in the river valley so they flew all of us in in helicopters each day. It was one of the best two week vacations I have ever taken. They even paid me about $20 bucks an hour. Its a shame I didn't get a speaking part. If you say more than just a few words in any way at all then the salary goes to over $100 per hour for the entire production time that you are on set. We had to mouth words without making any sound, pretend we were speaking to each other when they were actually shooting. It was quite the education in how movies are made. It sure isn't anything like what the finished product looks like. Everything, and I mean everything is fake. Even the ships in the pic I posted aren't real in any way. Directly under the water are big blocks of white Styrofoam, not a hull. They did have one real ship with an outboard motor. The exhaust came up the middle through what looked like a cooking fire pot. They even filled the entire valley with fake fog for one series of shots. It is amazing what they can do. That two weeks was a total blast. I even had a chance to chat with the stars a bit. Omar Sharif was a really nice guy and if you were interested in playing cards you were in the game.

Shooting a movie is all about waiting forever for a few minutes of actual action to happen. I also ended up being the unofficial meteorologist for the crew because I was fully equipped to download on short wave and print the latest satellite photos back then so I brought them with me each morning. I also had special access to all the offices because I kept their office equipment running. I got a really good inside look at all of it. My job with Xerox was a real "fly on the wall" job in a lot of places and that includes a lot of very high security locations that I shouldn't talk about even now. I had actual special security clearances including at the base a short bike ride from where I now live.