PDA

View Full Version : Cutting gear racks on a vertical mill



brian Rupnow
11-26-2016, 09:40 AM
Has anybody ever cut their own gear racks on a vertical milling machine? The quill travel on my machine is only 3", but the head moves up and down, so with some careful measuring the head could probably be raised/lowered incrementally to cut longer racks. I have a complete set of gear cutters 24DP. and have cut many gears but never a rack. I have purchased lengths of rack (they aren't horribly expensive) but I'm curious as to whether anyone has made their own.---Brian

boslab
11-26-2016, 09:57 AM
I have made a 4' rack but in all honesty it came out a bit rough, I cut 6 teeth them asked a bit of commercial rack as an index by clamping on top and advancing the rack one tooth at a time, it worked but my cutter was not brilliant.
I toyed with making racks on the lathe, imagine a rack then make it a round bar, ir was actually quite promising, it was easier to make the tool. The pinion was very like a rack worm if that makes sense, internal radius was the bar radius, I was making an arbour press so the rack was the ram at 2" diameter
If I had a suitable head I'd try the mill again, I need a 90 degree drive or horizontal head.
Mark

brian Rupnow
11-26-2016, 10:08 AM
I've thought about making a right angle head like Chuck Fellows did to convert my vertical mill to a horizontal mill for "one of" projects like racks, but for the work involved, it is far cheaper to buy rack commercially as I need it.

JCHannum
11-26-2016, 10:14 AM
A rack tooth form is not an involute. I would make or have made an end mill of the appropriate shape and mill with the vertical head.

brian Rupnow
11-26-2016, 11:00 AM
Jim--On the set of gear cutters I have, the largest cutter goes from 137 teeth to rack. The larger a gear gets in diameter, the less involute there is to the toothform. You are right. However, the gear cutters take that into account. That is why you can't cut all different gear diameters with one cutter.

JCHannum
11-26-2016, 11:13 AM
I fully understand that. Take a look at a true gear hob however, it will cut all tooth counts and is not involute form. Take a look in Machinery's Handbook at the basic rack of the full depth involute system. It is straight sided.

Even if it required a modified shape, it still would be much simpler to produce an end mill of the appropriate form to cut a rack on a vertical milling machine than to modify a vertical milling machine to use an involute cutter to produce what would be an imperfect rack in the end.

Jaakko Fagerlund
11-26-2016, 02:33 PM
If nothing else, grind a one fluted cutter (easiest in home scenario) with the proper angle and mill your keyway like you would mill most anything on the machine.

Just see what material you cut, as for example cold rolled will end up as a banana after cutting the rack.

brian Rupnow
11-26-2016, 02:46 PM
I'm not talking about a keyway. I am talking about a gear rack.---Different thing altogether. I already have a full set of gear cutters. The only limitation on using my largest cutter to make a rack is the limited (3") travel of the quill in my vertical mill.

BCRider
11-26-2016, 03:00 PM
Has anybody ever cut their own gear racks on a vertical milling machine? The quill travel on my machine is only 3", but the head moves up and down, so with some careful measuring the head could probably be raised/lowered incrementally to cut longer racks. .....

Assuming that your gear cutters are at least larger in diameter than the quill you're still going to run into the size of the head fouling any longer stock that is held in a vertical position.

On my present mill the nose of the quill is a bit over 4" in diameter. So the only way I could make a piece of rack that uses the whole 3.5" of travel of the quill would be to make up a LONG arbor. I'm basing this on the fact that the only medium and finer pitch gear cutters I've seen were fairly small. And certainly smaller than my present size mill's quill.

Norman Bain
11-26-2016, 03:11 PM
As you describe, on a mill of the style you are using there is need to have a right angle drive on the quill in order to cut a rack of any reasonable length.

Even then to get rack length longer than the Y-axis travel limit you need to lay the rack lengthwise along the table and cut on the Y-axis. Downside is that cutting with the Y-axis removes the ability to use the X-axis power feed ... presuming you have one of course.

Norman

brian Rupnow
11-26-2016, 03:24 PM
I never thought of that. My saw arbor is fairly long, but not longer than the stroke of the quill. It looks like I might get be able to get 3" maximum long rack using my vertical mill.
http://i307.photobucket.com/albums/nn294/BrianRupnow/IMG_0487_zps5azmgm2e.jpg[/IMG] (http://s307.photobucket.com/user/BrianRupnow/media/IMG_0487_zps5azmgm2e.jpg.html)

brian Rupnow
11-26-2016, 03:30 PM
No power feeds on my mill Norman,--although it does have an awesome travel in the x axis--something like 22".

JCHannum
11-26-2016, 03:35 PM
In Post 10, Sir John cuts a rack several feet long in his vertical milling machine using a simple end mill;

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/threads/41511-Gear-Rack-Cutting

BCRider
11-26-2016, 03:52 PM
The trick with the end mill used to cut the rack is that on smaller size pitches the tool would need to spin up pretty high. But it's got the advantage that a suitable cutter can be easily made by a home shop sort.

brian Rupnow
11-26-2016, 03:55 PM
Sir John knows a heck of a lot more than I ever will about machining. I'm pretty sure I've had my question answered. If I ever need any 24 dp racks, I buy them. that is what I did when I built the advance mechanism for my sawmill.

oldtiffie
11-26-2016, 05:38 PM
Rack gear forms:

http://i200.photobucket.com/albums/aa294/oldtiffie/Gear_theory/Gear_theory11.jpg (http://s200.photobucket.com/user/oldtiffie/media/Gear_theory/Gear_theory11.jpg.html)

wierdscience
11-26-2016, 09:58 PM
I've done 20* racks with a common 10* per side tapered endmill. It's dead simple,just tedious and repetitive on a manual mill.It's also another application where a DRO is nice.

Here's a quick video of the process on a CNC mill,turn the sound down,crappy backing music.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O1CFIAPPB2o

sewingmachine
11-26-2016, 10:47 PM
A right angle attachment would be the way to go , but I haven't seen one for a mill drill.

Dave

J Tiers
11-26-2016, 11:03 PM
If you turn the head, the width of the head is an issue. But if you can slow the spindle, and rig up a cutter wider than the head, you may be anle to do arbitrary lengths as if you had a horizontal attachment.

Question is how slow you can get the spindle to go. The cutter might get biggish and need to go pretty slow. Or on yours it might just be impractical as it would be on my Benchmaster.

If you rigged a tail support you could use a long arbor with the head turned 90 deg, but obviously the tail support would have to attach to something other than the table.

The cutter comes down to basically a truncated double angle cutter with the included angle double the 14.5 or 20 deg. The extras of rounding are not always present (fig 39 in the Tiffie pics), and can be added if desired. Easier with a fly cutter than modifying a suitable slitting saw.

outlawspeeder
11-27-2016, 12:12 AM
Wow so much information. Sir John used a CNC. Doing three four foot pieces or even eight 2 foot pieces would drive me nuts. I didn't think about the metal curling as it gets cut. I going with ball screws. I found a cheap (ebay) source for four footers. It will also make it easier.

brian Rupnow
11-27-2016, 09:08 AM
Chuck Fellows did a dandy job of making a right angle head for his vertical mill, posted pictures and a how to article. It might have been over on MEM website. I looked at it and decided no, too much work for me, I simply wouldn't have enough use to justify it.

davidwdyer
11-27-2016, 11:46 AM
Tubal Cain has a you tube video of cutting a small rack on a vertical mill.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dipd0ohrYzg

Spin Doctor
11-27-2016, 12:22 PM
Cut in three steps. 1) cut the center of the tooth out to form the root. 2) tilt the head at 20 and cut one side of the teeth. 3) flip the piece end for end and cut the second side. A lot of work and finicky to get right. Its 28 DP right. That works out to .1122 between tooth center lines (π28). If somebody really needed a lot of this it would either be better to source it commercially or look at building a Fellows type gear/rack shaper. It could be done I'll have to think of how to come up with ratio between the cutter and the leadscrew pitch. Needs to take into acount the number of teeth in the cutter and the DP and the pitch of the lead screw. With a 8TPI leadscrew and 28DP there are 1.1140819 teeth per one turn of the leadscrew. It would certainly attract attention at NAMES or a similiar event. I know I would find it more interesting than a model traction engine

Spin Doctor
11-27-2016, 01:29 PM
OK, with a 12 tooth 28DP cutter one full revolution of the cutter gives a distance of 1.3464" (π28x12). That meanfor every revolution of the cutter the leadscrew must make 10.7712 revolutions. A gear train of 3 steps with drivers of 20, 26 and 35 (18,200 teeth) and drivens of 53, 65 and 57 (196,365 teeth) delivers a ratio of 10.78928 which is close (1.001679) but not close enough. A bit more messing about and I'm sure I could get the gear traing down to .9999 to 1.0001 which is usually close enough for cutting helicals Such a machine would be an iteresting excercise both mentally and physically. If one were undertake such a project it would also make sense to build it to also cut internal and external gears/splines. The gear ratios of which are actually a lot easier to figure out

brian Rupnow
11-27-2016, 01:50 PM
That is a good video by Tubal Cain. I find his stuff a bit long winded but very thorough. Thank you. I would never set the head over on my mill at an angle. I know it can be done, but it makes me sweat blood every time I do, trying to get it back in tram.

wierdscience
11-27-2016, 04:22 PM
That's why the vertical method using either an end mill or a single lip cutter is the easiest.

J Tiers
11-27-2016, 09:21 PM
It occurs to me that if you DID swing over the head 90 deg, and used a long arbor, the support COULD be via the table. But the arbor would have to be a sliding fit in the support, so the table, work, and support could move along the arbor with. arbor sliding inside support as table is moved for each rack toothspace.

That would let you do an almost table length rack, if cutter clears the head, or one half as long if cutter does not, but table clears head.


That's why the vertical method using either an end mill or a single lip cutter is the easiest.

It's also crazy slow, particularly the single lip cutter.

Free lunches still on backorder.

wierdscience
11-27-2016, 10:36 PM
It's also crazy slow, particularly the single lip cutter.

Free lunches still on backorder.

Not nearly as slow as you may think,especially since you don't have to build anything or even tilt the mill head.Watch the video I linked to and then take a look at the size of the parts at 3:44 in.

https://youtu.be/O1CFIAPPB2o?t=3m44s

J Tiers
11-27-2016, 11:56 PM
Seemed as I expected. Most of a minute per tooth, at 36 DP. The dimension appears to be the advance from toothspace to toothspace, about 3mm or so.

Worse for bigger. An end milling video that came up with that one showed even slower with CNC, gashing, then multi pass for final forming.

Using a 135 to rack cutter will go several times faster, theoretically as much faster as the number of teeth on the cutter vs the single edge on the fly cutter.

Using the bored thru arbor bearing on the table would let a gear cutter be used, for reasonable length.

One could rig a similar system vertically with the bearing and work off the side of the table, if it was undesirable to swivel the head off vertical for any reason, as Brian alludes to.

wierdscience
11-28-2016, 12:50 AM
Seemed as I expected. Most of a minute per tooth, at 36 DP. The dimension appears to be the advance from toothspace to toothspace, about 3mm or so.

Worse for bigger. An end milling video that came up with that one showed even slower with CNC, gashing, then multi pass for final forming.

Using a 135 to rack cutter will go several times faster, theoretically as much faster as the number of teeth on the cutter vs the single edge on the fly cutter.

Using the bored thru arbor bearing on the table would let a gear cutter be used, for reasonable length.

One could rig a similar system vertically with the bearing and work off the side of the table, if it was undesirable to swivel the head off vertical for any reason, as Brian alludes to.

Laying the head over isn't practical at all.You won't find a gear cutter with a diameter large enough to clear the quill let alone the quill housing. Even if you did it would be cost prohibitive to buy one.Even with a right angle attachment it wouldn't be possible since the housing diameter on those leaves you with the same problem.

Using an end mill however does work,works well and won't take as long to remove the same material as a gear cutter will.By single lip cutter,I meant engraving type,not a fly cutter.In post #10 here Sir John is doing just exactly that-

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/threads/41511-Gear-Rack-Cutting

J Tiers
11-28-2016, 09:55 AM
Laying the head over isn't practical at all.You won't find a gear cutter with a diameter large enough to clear the quill let alone the quill housing. Even if you did it would be cost prohibitive to buy one.Even with a right angle attachment it wouldn't be possible since the housing diameter on those leaves you with the same pro

No it does not have any of those issues. You are simply not thinking about it right.

1) you block up the work if necessary, or hold it in a vise, which right away takes care of much of the issue

2). You use a long enough arbor (you may have to make it) so the work need not go under the quill

3). the arbor needs to be supported. Either a separate support off the table, or a maybe a sliding support could be rigged that tied to the table but still allows sideways movement, I have seen one used, although it offers vertical restraint only.

For most mills of the non-knee (mill drill type), the support can be fixed to the base or even to the bench or stand and supports independent of table movement. I think Brian's is that type, so an outboard support is possible.

Length is not unlimited, but much longer than the quill travel.

Cutter diameter?

Remember, this is for a RACK. It is a regular V, not an involute. So even a thick slitting saw could be ground to make the profile, and slitting saws are not very expensive even in 4" diameters, often available used, for cheap. Fly cutters are also pretty cheap and can be made in any effective diameter.

For a horizontal attachment, you do NOT move the head, and the housings are smaller. So put the cutter at the support end, and you have the full length of the attachment, which is normally fairly wide, 8 inches maybe.

You just have to think creatively.

JCHannum
11-28-2016, 10:27 AM
The OP was asking can you cut a rack on a vertical milling machine. The answer was yes, using an end mill ground to shape. The question was then further defined to using an involute 135 tooth to rack milling cutter. The answer was not easily and with several limitations.

An end mill or single lip cutter can be shop made in a short time, cutting the tooth space takes a finite time.

An involute milling cutter will cut that space in a shorter time (shorter not being defined), but to be able to utilize a milling cutter an elaborate very involved set of tooling must be designed and fabricated that will yet have limitations imposed by the diameter of the milling cutter. Since an involute milling cutter will not produce a proper rack tooth, purchase and grind a slitting saw. Yeah, that is definitely the way to go.

J Tiers
11-28-2016, 11:48 AM
......Since an involute milling cutter will not produce a proper rack tooth, purchase and grind a slitting saw. Yeah, that is definitely the way to go.

No need to be sarcastic and nasty.

Likely the saw is NOT "the" way to go, but it is a POSSIBLE way to go, IF there is a diameter issue.

My own thought is that an involute cutter is perfectly fine for the purpose. The difference between a near 136 tooth and a rack is not so much that normal applications will be an issue.

A fly cutter is hardly any hassle, easier than a SLC.

Turning the head and rigging up an arbor is no worse than many setups, and uses a cutter that is stated to be available IIRC. But if that is regarded as too difficult, the other methods will obviously work. A horizontal attachment is one easy way, but the chance of that being available for Brian's machine seems low........

grinding up a single lip cutter? Well, it works. Better if you have a good grinder, which I do not recall if Brian has.

Find and purchase an end mill of the right angle? About up there with the saw idea.

Use a narrow EM and several passes at different angles? That also works, but can be tricky, and is poor for small DPs. Brian does not want to re-tram

Finally, a larger diameter slitting saw could be used. Gash, cut one side, cut the other, but again 3 passes at different angles, so takes a long time and requires a re-tram.

Given that a re-tram is regarded as out of the question, it is effectively down to:

1) short lengths using an arbor and 135-rack cutter used with head vertical (fast setup, fast cut, but short length)

2) the over the table edge system and longer fabbed arbor (fab time, but fast cut)

3) A specialty EM ($$, time to wait, time to cut)

4) A single lip cutter. (time to grind, more time to cut)

Honestly, I don't know which is faster overall, other than the short length option.

JCHannum
11-28-2016, 12:51 PM
Grinding a HSS or carbide single lip cutter, or regrinding an existing junk end mill if you have a T&C grinder is a simple matter. It is done every day. If no T&C grinder, it is still a simple matter to turn, mill and harden a suitable cutter from drill rod. It is a basic skill every HSM should master for multiple purposes. Total time involved in any case 1-2 hours maximum, total cost, probably much less than $5.00 and you are ready to go, capable of cutting any length rack you need.

Turning the head and using an involute milling cutter with a standard arbor might work, but you must raise the workpiece enough to bring it high enough for the head to clear the table. Given adequate vertical travel, you can accomplish the same thing by working up a means of holding the workpiece in the vertical position. In either case, you will be l imited in length as the workpiece will foul the head or spindle. Similarly, using a right angle attachment (which Brian also does not have) is length limited.

You can overcome some of the length restrictions by fabricating an extended arbor, but at some point, sooner rather than later, you will run into flex problems and need some kind of outboard support.

Short answer is that if the aim is to use the vertical mill and an involute milling cutter, you will be very limited in length produced. If you need more than an inch or so, the simplest and most economical method is to use some form of end milling cutter.

J Tiers
11-28-2016, 02:02 PM
His head travel is 3", so "an inch or so" seems overly limiting.

Anyhow, the original question did not come down quite to "using an involute cutter AND not moving the head". Not moving the head came later, and may not be an "absolute". All the things any of us have suggested are possible ways to "(Has anybody ever) cut their own gear racks on a vertical milling machine(?)"

Discounting ANY idea offhand as stupid and unworthy is a poor plan. It may be non-optimal, but may in turn lead to another idea that IS usable.

Maybe you and Wierdscience need to do a little creative brainstorming practice.... you NEVER dump on crazy ideas on the first pass.

Brian mentioned cranking the head up and down, and with a long arbor, using involute or fly cutter, that can/will make reasonable length racks.

The EM or SLC will allow arbitrary length, but are slow. The other way requires making tooling, but it need not be fancy-finished, and anyhow, making tooling is what we all do.......:D It's a tradeoff in time PER cut vs time UNTIL first cut. I suspect Brian has a better handle on that than you do, as he would be the one doing the work.

JCHannum
11-28-2016, 02:29 PM
I do know about brainstorming, having been involved with it at all levels since the 60's at its inception. Where did say any other idea is stupid?

Yes, I did say an inch or so, there is a definite limit to the length of a rack that can be cut by that manner. If vertical travel is 3", that might or might not be the limiting factor. Construction details of the arbor, headspace of the machine and other factors come into play. Regardless, the distance between the cutter and the first obstruction encountered limits the length of rack possible. This cannot be overcome without going to the expense and time involved in fabrication of tooling or machine modifications required. There is no such limit with the end mill.

John Stevenson
11-28-2016, 04:47 PM
Jerry, Check your meds. You are doing the usual trick and arguing for arguing sake.

A cutter big enough to fit on a horizontal head and miss the casting wil need to run at low revs to get the surface speed correct and be in a band that many machines cannot drop to and still keep torque.

Instead of arguing why not set a test job up, do it and post the pics. Otherwise it's just the noise of a duck farting.

J Tiers
11-28-2016, 06:50 PM
Jerry, Check your meds. You are doing the usual trick and arguing for arguing sake.

A cutter big enough to fit on a horizontal head and miss the casting wil need to run at low revs to get the surface speed correct and be in a band that many machines cannot drop to and still keep torque.

Instead of arguing why not set a test job up, do it and post the pics. Otherwise it's just the noise of a duck farting.

Well, your post appears to be your brain farting......

If you READ instead of running off at the mouth first, you'd have known I already mentioned that as an issue with that particular approach, back a couple of posts. And I gave at least a half dozen OTHER approaches, most of which have no need for the slow speed, so why focus on that one alone and basically call me a dumb **** on account of it?

It's gonna depend on the head casting, isn;t it? Some it will be impractical on, with others might work. I mentioned that it is impractical with the Benchmaster..... it has about a 6" pulley close behind the spindle nose....THAT is way too big. Others may have a smaller area near the quill, and pulleys farther away. Some B-ports could be set up sideways with a reasonable clearance for some distance back, but may not have the ability to run that way properly lubed. No, you won;t clear the entire head, but you may do better than straight quill travel.

Don't like the place you have to use on the table? Putting the part up in the vise, or otherwise blocking it up may even clear the pulley end of the head, and let you use whatever part of the table you want.

As for Brian's mill, he can easily see if there is an issue, no need for you to tell him about it, I expect he can figure that out......

And, while on the subject of speeds, the HSS fly cutter is limited by the same sort of speed issues, based on it's effective diameter, which is likely to be in the same range (3" plus). While you are going off on folks, go off on the ones who mentioned THAT "obviously stupid" idea............

And while at it, you might mention that the diameter is adjustable with that. so you can get "just enough" and not too much, cheaply.

Otherwise you are just talking with the one-eyed end.

You yourself posted pics of using the right angle head to do it..... and got a decent length of rack with it, too.

Anyway, there seemed to be a discussion of alternatives, and I gave a raft of them. Not all need to be practical with every mill. They are just ideas for further development, ON THE ORIGINAL SUBJECT of rack cutting with the vertical mill. Been a lot of farting noises having to do with alternatives being too much work, etc, but they are all off topic.

Weston Bye
11-28-2016, 07:38 PM
I made a profile endmill as JC Hannum suggested, drill rod machined and heat treated. (Photo was the one most handy, milling Delrin) Worked a treat on gears, but would do equally well (with proper profile) for a rack clamped down to the mill table. Indeed, careful unclamping, indexing and reclamping, using the milling cutter as the reference allows making a rack longer than the working travel of the table. As mentioned, un-stress relieved cold-rolled steel will warp when unclamped from the table.http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/Weston/DSCN3881.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/Weston/media/DSCN3881.jpg.html)

Weston Bye
11-29-2016, 10:06 AM
Better view of cutter used above.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/0803/Weston/Photo04_zpsu0frecf9.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/Weston/media/Photo04_zpsu0frecf9.jpg.html)

John Stevenson
11-29-2016, 02:17 PM
You yourself posted pics of using the right angle head to do it..... and got a decent length of rack with it, too.



http://www.stevenson-engineers.co.uk/files/rack2.jpg

Pray explain where the right angled head is in the picture.




Otherwise you are just talking with the one-eyed end.

J Tiers
11-29-2016, 02:25 PM
The End mill looks quite nice, and if Brian can make one, it will get the job done.

It was quite common to do that for very large gears, apparently, back when machines using such gears were more common.




Pray explain where the right angled head is in the picture.




Otherwise you are just talking with the one-eyed end.

That's the WRONG PICTURE...

You have the right one on your own website or picture storage.... shows YOUR RA head and a LONG unsupported arbor sticking out, making racks for some sort of faceplate chuck. Cutter is in the middle somewhere

I found it once, can't be bothered to look for it again, you can. It's your pic.

You are a smart fellah, but this time you are spouting off nonsense for the sake of arguing. Look over your OWN pics and find it. Was posted HERE on this forum, for goodness sake.

This BS is off topic and just for your own amusement anyhow, it makes no difference to the OP.


EDIT
BTW, I found it, look HERE. Posting reference to show the method, which apparently worked better than it looks like it should. IIRC you said material was stainless, if so it worked quite well despite the scary setup.

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/threads/49131-Rack-cutting-on-a-POS-Bridgeport?highlight=rack

John Stevenson
11-29-2016, 02:50 PM
Forgot that one Jerry as it wasn't part of the thread but it proves one thing.

If you can do it, then do it.
If you can't do it then bitch about it....................;)

JCHannum
11-29-2016, 03:47 PM
The two photos of John's two approaches to cutting a rack with a vertical milling machine quite clearly point out the differences between the two.

Using a right angle attachment, which is no different than laying the head over or using some kind of fixture to hold the work in a vertical position. The length of the rack is limited by interference with the spindle at some point. John's rack was limited to 10 teeth/11 spaces. The limber arbor is scary per Jerry himself.

The vertical with the end cutter is unlimited in length and a very rigid setup.

Wes's post shows how simple the cutter can be.

J Tiers
11-29-2016, 04:58 PM
It's all just OPTIONS. Different ways to do the work, different tooling needed.

Each job may require, allow, or prohibit various of the OPTIONS.

If the cutter is not big enough (must be over 3 1/8 inches for a standard BP RA head) to clear, then you can't do a long rack with a RA head.

OTOH, I have seen, in our sponsor's magazines, a photo illustrating cutting a longish rack with a similar "horizontal attachment". IIRC, it handily cleared the rack, so it's not impossible at all. No recollection of the type of attachment, nor the make/model of the machine. I think the article was long enough ago that it was in the black and white version of the magazines.

Again, OPTIONS.... Nobody is DEMANDING that a particular job MUST be run a certain way, and ONLY that certain way. Each method has its own needs and limitations, in speed, tooling, etc. Some are faster, but take more setup, some are slower but are easy to set up. The user has to decide what is most convenient for each job with the tools at hand.

You will probably have to do something to set up, be that making a cutter, making a rig to use cutters you have, or whatever. If you find making cutters easy, you will drift that way. If you are good at rigging up unusual temporary tooling, you will go that way.

brian Rupnow
11-29-2016, 06:13 PM
What I'm really good at, is picking up the phone and calling one of my gear suppliers and ordering a rack the length I need.

DATo
11-30-2016, 04:58 AM
What I'm really good at, is picking up the phone and calling one of my gear suppliers and ordering a rack the length I need.

Now THAT'S the best reply I've read so far! *LOL*

Weston Bye
11-30-2016, 08:22 AM
Has anybody ever cut their own gear racks on a vertical milling machine? ...

After 45 replies:


What I'm really good at, is picking up the phone and calling one of my gear suppliers and ordering a rack the length I need.

Well, that was a wasted thread.

Maybe somebody else learned something...

boslab
11-30-2016, 12:02 PM
Additionally I have cut some rack teeth after welding damaged teeth with the slotter on my mill, that worked fine btw, slow but it was a big rack about 1 1/4" square, 8' long, some mangled teeth ( British dentistry)
Mark

brian Rupnow
11-30-2016, 12:31 PM
No Weston--It wasn't wasted. I looked at all the varying threads and was able to benefit from the knowledge put forth by other machinists. I also got to see someone get there arse ripped by Sir John, which is always fun, as long as it's not my arse he's ripping.---Brian

Weston Bye
11-30-2016, 12:44 PM
Yep, sorry Brian, perhaps I was a little harsh. 'Tis a good thing to ask a question and then formulate a course of action...


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_VrFV5r8cs0

J Tiers
11-30-2016, 01:28 PM
No Weston--It wasn't wasted. I looked at all the varying threads and was able to benefit from the knowledge put forth by other machinists. I also got to see someone get there arse ripped by Sir John, which is always fun, as long as it's not my arse he's ripping.---Brian

It's even more fun when Sir J hollers and is mistaken..... as in this case.

But there are lots of ways to do the job.

Did you have a specific task? Or was it a general question?