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plunger
12-31-2016, 05:16 AM
Does any one have a go to thread on making a quick release nut.I saw an interesting one on a sink mixer that was just a nut with threads missing at 180 degrees to each other.
This is not for a mill but for a canopy hanger for my vehicle.(fiberglass canopy)I need to drive under a lean too and hook it up but dont want to wind the nuts forever.

Daveb
12-31-2016, 05:27 AM
A similar device is used on an aftermarket depth stop for Bridgeport milling machines, there is some info on the web about making them.

KMoffett
12-31-2016, 07:42 AM
Thread size and pitch?

Ken

Magicniner
12-31-2016, 08:17 AM
I think you're asking about a "Breech Thread"

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=breech+thread&safe=off&espv=2&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjs_seKwp7RAhWHdlAKHduoB2EQ_AUICCgB&biw=1280&bih=710

- Nick

KMoffett
12-31-2016, 08:21 AM
A breach thread requires mating splines on both the "rod" and the "nut"

Google:quick release nut

Ken

Magicniner
12-31-2016, 08:23 AM
How would you propose moving a nut with threads missing up a threaded rod unless the rod too has missing threads?

plunger
12-31-2016, 08:35 AM
The thread pitch can be either m10 or m12x1.75 or similer .Just big enough to be strong enough to hold 100kg through four hangers.

plunger
12-31-2016, 08:38 AM
How would you propose moving a nut with threads missing up a threaded rod unless the rod too has missing threads?

The nut I saw has a threaded hole drilled through the nut but at 180 degree to each other it is drilled off axis. So you tilt the nut off center and slide it up the threaded rod and then get it in the same plane as the threaded rod and simply turn the nut on.The tension on the nut will prevent it from tilting.

enl
12-31-2016, 08:43 AM
The few times I have made them (functional, but not great), it has been by making the nut as normal, then tilt it, and bore using an endmill that is the a little more than the major diameter of the thread. The angle of tilt depends on the length of the thread, since it needs to leave the entire thread untouched on one side at the ends. The endmill needs to be a little bigger than the nominal major diameter, or it isn't possible to rock the nut into engagement. I should guesss that the manufacturers have better methods and precise sizes for the bore, but I have done them with what I have on hand. If I needed one and didn't have the proper endmill, I would probably make a workholder for the lathe to hold the nut at the proper angle and use a boring bar.

For pics of commercial nuts, https://www.google.com/search?q=quick+release+nut&biw=1920&bih=1008&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi2qJ3lxZ7RAhXD4iYKHcXaAasQsAQIcA#imgrc= D1OwFZmnDuYpBM%3A
or https://us.misumi-ec.com/vona2/detail/110300251850/

plunger
12-31-2016, 09:42 AM
The few times I have made them (functional, but not great), it has been by making the nut as normal, then tilt it, and bore using an endmill that is the a little more than the major diameter of the thread. The angle of tilt depends on the length of the thread, since it needs to leave the entire thread untouched on one side at the ends. The endmill needs to be a little bigger than the nominal major diameter, or it isn't possible to rock the nut into engagement. I should guesss that the manufacturers have better methods and precise sizes for the bore, but I have done them with what I have on hand. If I needed one and didn't have the proper endmill, I would probably make a workholder for the lathe to hold the nut at the proper angle and use a boring bar.

For pics of commercial nuts, https://www.google.com/search?q=quick+release+nut&biw=1920&bih=1008&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwi2qJ3lxZ7RAhXD4iYKHcXaAasQsAQIcA#imgrc= D1OwFZmnDuYpBM%3A
or https://us.misumi-ec.com/vona2/detail/110300251850/

This is the nut I am referring to.

A.K. Boomer
12-31-2016, 11:00 AM
It's about as simple a design as you can get and would also be cake to build,

the base of the nut is what would keep it from ejecting itself as under load it would not want to cock, still not as strong as a normal fastener but great for light duty stuff.

all's that would be needed is to cant the head on your mill - or hold the nut at the proper angle and bore down it's centerline removing half the threads on one side and then half on the other,,, endmill would have to be at least as large as the internal thread diameter inside the nut.

Black Forest
12-31-2016, 11:23 AM
Would a flip nut work? The type that is used on most every chop saw vise.

Illinoyance
12-31-2016, 11:53 AM
https://www.carrlane.com/catalog/index.cfm/27825071F0B221118070C1C513E111D081B0006280B1713050 245221E0107070F1A3C3B2853524058

darryl
12-31-2016, 05:35 PM
You could take a coupler nut, chuck it and round off about half the length, then cut it in half lengthwise. Make a section of tubing that will slip over the rounded part. Fit the tubing onto the threaded rod, fit the two halves of the nut together about where you want it, the slip the tubing over it. From there you can wind it normally. Just another idea.