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michigan doug
12-31-2016, 08:31 PM
I have a portable mig gun (Readywelder). I find it to be pretty capable, and it's portable because it is designed to run off 18 to 36 volts DC, like golf cart batteries.

The problem is, no matter how much love and attention you give your deep cycle golf cart batteries, after 5 to 7 years, they're toast.

I don't do that much welding that has to be portable, and I don't want to buy 2-300 dollars worth of golf cart batteries again, but that's my only mig gun.



Can I use my thunderbolt AC/DC stick welder to drive my DC readywelder?

Here is the readywelder:

http://readywelder.com/


Here is the Miller Thunderbolt AC/DC stick welder (not mine, but one just like mine):

http://i20.photobucket.com/albums/b245/sloppy-ollies/newrig.jpg


It's the old transformer kind, not the newfangled one with a computer and digital readout.


Thanks in advance,

flylo
12-31-2016, 09:08 PM
You can run a tig with no problem & hi-freq AC for alum, I have both converters.

doctor demo
12-31-2016, 10:17 PM
I have a portable mig gun (Readywelder).
Can I use my thunderbolt AC/DC stick welder to drive my DC readywelder?
Here is the readywelder:
http://readywelder.com/
Thanks in advance,
In the link you provided,it says you can.
"POWERFUL: This MIG Welder can be powered by batteries, or by AC current when connected to a welding machine as a Spool Gun."

Steve

michigan doug
01-01-2017, 05:19 AM
Guess I better go do some more digging.

I find their question and answer ambiguous:

"5. Can I connect the RW-II to my Miller/Lincoln etc MIG or ARC welder to use as a “spool gun” attachment?

Answer: Quite possibly. The RW-II was designed for pure DC and does not tolerate AC, voltage spikes or input levels which exceed 40 volts. The circuit board brain of the RW-II is very sensitive to waveform distortions as well. Welding machines with “constant voltage” and/or “constant current” DC outputs which can be adjusted to levels between 24 and 36 volts DC, may work just fine, but keep in mind that the RW-II was designed for batteries and any other power source may cause problems."



So, my understanding of a transformer welder suggests that it operates as a constant current device, and will adjust the voltage on the fly to maintain the arc. And, open circuit voltage may rise to more than 50 volts.

If that is true, then I run the risk of toasting the circuit board on the ReadyWelder.

MaxHeadRoom
01-01-2017, 11:23 AM
A SMAW stick welder operates on a slightly different principle than MIG or TIG
The SMAW has an initial very high open circuit voltage which collapses with current, some as High as 100v, in order to maintain constant current, whereas the other types have a constant low voltage supply, around 35v.
The SMAW usually has a variable inductive coupling between primary and secondary of the transformer.
Max.

garyhlucas
01-01-2017, 11:47 AM
It could be used safely with a mig welder because a mig welder is a constant voltage power source and you can adjust the output voltage. It can't be used with a tig or stick welder because those are constant current power sources which under a no load condition will have a high voltage output.

OhioDesperado
01-01-2017, 12:24 PM
OK, there is a difference in the type of power supply used in MIG and TIG/Stick welding. MIG is DC constant voltage. Meaning that the power supply will try to maintain the DC voltage no matter the current draw. TIG / Stick supplies are constant current power supplies. Meaning they attempt to maintain the current flow level across a varying voltage.

Now what you can do.
Older CV power supplies are available but you need to be careful that you get one that IS CV. The industrial 3 phase supplies that are transformer design are all over the place for much less than a set of batteries. They are not however portable. You will need a rotary phase converter to run them typically but if that gun will really handle 350 amps then that is the way I would go.

Second option is finding a crapped out 110 volt MIG unit that has no stinger on it. Again, they are out there as the guns cost as much as a new unit. I have one in the barn in fact I gave 10 bucks for years ago. You would just need to connect the gun up to the supply output and wire the trigger button input closed so it would product power.

Lastly. You can build an electronic voltage regulator circuit that would handle the power from your welder and only feed a set voltage out. Because of the design of the parts that control the output voltage it would rectify the AC output of the welder (make it DC) and set a fixed constant voltage that could be controlled. With this of course an understanding of electronics is going to be required.

michigan doug
01-01-2017, 01:14 PM
OK, nix on plugging it directly into the constant current dc welder.

Willy
01-01-2017, 02:07 PM
Have you looked at page 8 & 9 in the Ready Welder instruction manual, connecting your RW II?

http://readywelder.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/RW-Online-Manual.pdf


8
BATTERIES
Batteries are an excellent power source for welding, as this is pure DC power. Two 12 volt batteries connected in
series will produce 24VDC, and will provide up to 275 amps of power with .040” wire, to single pass up to 1/2” plate.
At 36VDC, the RW-II will pull up to 350 amps to penetrate 3/4” material. As you decrease the wire size down to
.023”, this will increase the resistance to help reduce the output power. By adjusting the gas mixture and voltage, the
RW-II will adjust to a spray transfer process. Deep cycle marine batteries have a longer discharge/recharge life over
standard batteries. However, welding performance will be the same with either type of battery.
Model 10000/10000-CS
Connect two 12 volt batteries in series by connecting the positive terminal of battery #1 to the negitive terminal of
battery #2. This set up provides the necessary 24 volts. For all gas shielded wires use standard polarity (green LED
light). Connect the lead (gun) to the positive terminal on battery #2 and the ground to the negative terminal of battery
#1. Again the green polarity light indicates proper standard polarity. For flux core, self-shielded, wire use negative
polarity (red LED light) with the gun lead connected to the negative terminal of battery #1 and the ground connected
to the positive terminal of battery #2. See illustration on page 11.
Model 10000ADP
Connect to batteries as described above, you will need to connect the small black wire with male bullet connector
from the jacket of the cable to the small red wire with female bullet connector on the negative side of the red plug,
this will then complete the circuit of the motor (Default Factory Setting). See illustration on page 12.
Model 10000ADP-CS
Connect to batteries as described above, you will need to connect the small red wire with female bullet connector
on the Cold Switch Box labeled “Batteries” to the unlabeled small red wire with male bullet connector on the Cold
Switch Box, this will complete the circuit of the motor (Default Factory Setting). See illustration on page 12.
Model 10250
This model is not shipped from the factory with a ground cable or a battery series cable. The user must supply both
of these items for battery connection. Connect the batteries in series as described before, connect the RW-II lug to
the open terminal and the customer supplied ground cable to the other open terminal. Connect the small jumper wire
equipped with the mini clamp to the same terminal as the the ground cable to complete the motor circuit. See illustra
tion on page 12.
Model 10250-CS
Connect to batteries as described above, you will need to connect the small red wire with female bullet connector
on the Cold Switch Box labeled “Batteries” to the unlabeled small red wire with male bullet connector on the
Cold Switch, this will complete the circuit of the motor (Default Factory Setting). See illustration on page 12.

9
DC/CV POWER SOURCE & ENGINE DRIVES
Constant Voltage (CV) MIG machines also make an excellent power source for the RW-II. The voltage control on
these machines will directly affect the welding power. The wire speed will also have an effect on the power, i.e. the
faster the wire feed the higher the amp draw. It is not required to use the AC/DC power supply supplied with these
machines, but if the power supply is used, it must be connected in the same polarity as the arc current. The RW-II will
be controled by the voltage control on the machine.
Model 10000/10000-CS
Connect the RW-II positive lug to the positive output stud on the machine, or you can connect to any part of the roller
block, if needed. Then connect the negative lug of the RW-II to the negative post of the machine. Connect the RW-II
ground clamp to the work piece, and close the contactor on your machine. Some models require you to close the con
tactor by closing the existing MIG gun switch/trigger, this can sometimes be accomplished by jumping the contactor
if the machine has a 7 or 14 pin connector on the front. Be sure to release the drive roll tension if there is wire in the
machine. See illustration on page 13.
Model 10000ADP
Connect as described above, except connect the small black wire with male bullet connector from the jacket to the
small red wire with female bullet connector on the negative side of the red plastic connector. Be sure the machine is
set on constant voltage (if applicable). See illustration on page 13.
Model 10250
Connect the RW-II lug to the positive output on the machine or to one of the bolts on the roller block, connect the
small clamp to the connector from the jacket of the RW-II and to the negative post in the machine or anywhere along
the machine ground. Connect the machine ground to the work piece. Again, some machines require you to close the
contactor by closing the existing MIG gun switch/trigger, this can sometimes be accomplished by jumping the con
tactor if the machine has a 7 or 14 pin connector on the front. Be sure to release the drive roll tension if there is wire
in the machine. Be sure the machine is set on constant voltage (if applicable). See illustration on page 14.
Model 10000ADP-CS/10250-CS
Connect to machine as described above, you will need to connect the small red wire with female bullet connector
on the Cold Switch Box labeled “Batteries” to the unlabeled small red wire with male bullet connector on the Cold
Switch Box, this will complete the circuit of the motor (Default Factory Setting). See illustration on page 13/14.
DC/CC ENGINE DRIVES AND STICK MACHINES
All stick welding machines are constant current (CC). These machines can be diffcult to adjust to, at frst, as the
initial voltage spike causes the wire to burn back readily. However, once you have mastered the technique it should be
easy to repeat. These power sources will weld aluminum and flux core wire but generally will not have the sustained
voltage to run hard wire. Always start with a higher wire speed and adjust down until the arc appears to “dial in”. The
machine will drop from approximately 80 volts to the mid 20 volt range after the initial arc is struck. It is imperative
to use the AC/DC power supply supplied with the RW-II and it must be connected in the same polarity as the arc cur
rent. Gas welding is DC- or ground negative (green LED light), and flux core is DC+ or ground positive (red LED
light). Change arc polarity as you would with a welding rod.
Model 10000/10000-CS
These models are not suitable for constant current machines.
Model 10000ADP/10000ADP-CS
Connect the postivie RW-II lug to the stinger and the negative RW-II lug to the ground c1amp of the machine. As
normal, the RW-II can also be directly connected to the positive and negative posts. It is imperative that you use the
AC/DC power supply to drive the gun controls, these connections must be in the same polarity as the arc current. See
illustration on page 14.
Model 10250/10250-CS
Connect postive RW-II lug to the stinger or directly to the positive output on the machine. It is imperative that you
use the AC/DC power supply to drive gun controls, these connections must be in the same polarity as the arc
current. See illustration on page 14.

BigMike782
01-01-2017, 08:58 PM
Doug, I looked at the website and still don't quite understand how it works but if you want to bring it over some time we can try and run it from my MillerMatic 200.....no circuit boards to let the smoke outta dontacha know.

michigan doug
01-02-2017, 10:26 AM
Have you looked at page 8 & 9 in the Ready Welder instruction manual, connecting your RW II?

http://readywelder.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/RW-Online-Manual.pdf

Thanks Willy, but mine is 8 or 9 years old and does not come with the power supply referred to here when hooking up to a constant current machine:

" It is imperative to use the AC/DC power supply supplied with the RW-II and it must be connected in the same polarity as the arc cur
rent."



finest regards,

doug