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loose nut
01-05-2017, 02:22 PM
As the title says I bought one to try in the shop. 60 watt equivalent bulb for $4 at a dollar store. No Name bulb. So what should I expect first

-bulb burns out quickly
-bulb bursts into flames
-bulb explodes

Axkiker
01-05-2017, 02:25 PM
It provides light lol

BCRider
01-05-2017, 02:29 PM
I've bought my share of no name bulbs too. What I found is that if there's an issue at all that the power supply in the bulb fails. Some use a transformer and others use a little board with a half dozen or so parts to cut the supply voltage down to something suitable for the LED.

At any rate if it does go it'll be with a whimper and not with a bang.

KelvinG
01-05-2017, 02:44 PM
I've bought my share of no name bulbs too. What I found is that if there's an issue at all that the power supply in the bulb fails. Some use a transformer and others use a little board with a half dozen or so parts to cut the supply voltage down to something suitable for the LED.

At any rate if it does go it'll be with a whimper and not with a bang.

Agree 100%. LEDs are LEDs and last a very long time, however the quality of power supply components and design vary greatly.

I use to buy cheap LEDs and when they died I'd do a post mortem. The failure has ALLWAYS been power supply or soldering issues. I finally gave up on the cheap sh*t.

Sent from my SM-P900 using Tapatalk

J Tiers
01-05-2017, 05:27 PM
If you can get CREE, buy them. Some areas may have a rebate or the powerco pays part of it. I can get them "60W" 4 pack for $8 here.

That subsidy will disappear in about 15 days after inauguration of the new guy

PStechPaul
01-05-2017, 06:39 PM
I bought some cheap Chinese LED bulbs and they only lasted about 4-6 months. The electronics did not fail, but the LEDs were driven too hard and became intermittent and finally shorted out.

I replaced the bad ones with even smaller white LEDs and they lasted only a few minutes:

http://enginuitysystems.com/pix/electronics/LED_Lamp_9W_Repair_2345.jpg

http://enginuitysystems.com/pix/electronics/LED_Lamp_2348.AVI

http://enginuitysystems.com/pix/electronics/LED_Lamp_2350.AVI

The Cree LEDs are probably best, if you get the genuine article and not a fake. Phillips also seem to be pretty good.

Magicniner
01-05-2017, 06:51 PM
I have some 4w (30w equivalent) Filament LED bulbs that produce excellent light that have run for over a year so far, I'm very happy with them and will replace them with the same or similar when they fail,

- Nick

danlb
01-05-2017, 07:16 PM
As the title says I bought one to try in the shop. 60 watt equivalent bulb for $4 at a dollar store. No Name bulb. So what should I expect first

-bulb burns out quickly
-bulb bursts into flames
-bulb explodes

Several other possibilities exist. I've been witness to....

Bulb flickers. (1)
Bulb DOA (1) ***
Glass globe falls off (2) **
Make slight buzzing noise *
Work perfectly (14)

Dan
* An early and expensive model from 8 years ago. Just happened to install it in quiet bedroom.
** Both were CREE from the same batch, used inverted in a bare fixture. The glue came loose.
*** Feit from Costco. Replaced no questions asked.
**** I have 14 or so that have been in place for several years with no problems. Another 12 T-8 tubes recently added.

J Tiers
01-05-2017, 07:44 PM
The CREE no longer use the glass, although I run some of that type inverted and have had no trouble. The newer ones are even better light.

I've had ONE problem with the CREE bulbs.... one light is intermittent when used in a fixture that gets hot. It is now working perfectly in a different fixture.

All the FEIT bulbs I have had have eventuallyfailed with fire shooting out, unless replaced early. They were all compact fluorescent, I learned my lesson as far as FEIT back then

tincture500
01-05-2017, 08:15 PM
Costco has led bulbs that are value priced. And seem to be quality. 4 - 60w $7

ulav8r
01-05-2017, 09:23 PM
WalMart Great Value 4 pack 60 watt, $3.87.

J Tiers
01-05-2017, 10:22 PM
WalMart Great Value 4 pack 60 watt, $3.87.

The only way they can do that is to have two different currency systems. As in china. Or to use it to get folks into your store and accept a loss to do it. Walmart is only cheaper on certain things, many many other items cost the same or more at Walmart.

The value of labor, investment, and machinery is such that that price is simply not a "real" price, as in there is more value in the product than you are paying for. "The system is rigged." That price might be possible for automated production of standard light bulbs. There isn't a lot of complexity in a standard incandescent. But there is too much more stuff inside an LED bulb to make that a "real" price.

At $3.87, and a 50% mark, each LED bulb costs under 50 cents for walmart to buy and ship from china to the store, stock, keep track of, handle at the cashier, etc.

Right......

Paul Alciatore
01-05-2017, 10:31 PM
Why on earth buy them at a dollar store? Buy a name brand for gosh sake. Canada has 408 Wal-Marts and probably other equivalent stores? LED prices are dropping daily. I am sure you can find a name brand for that price or even less.

I have at least 5 or 6 LED screw-in bulbs in use for about 4 years now and haven't had a failure yet. I believe I got all of them at Wal-Mart. That number may seem small, but a lot of my home lights are four foot fluorescents and I am replacing the screw-in CFs only as they fail and my supply of spares runs out.

loose nut
01-06-2017, 10:41 AM
I just picked one up to try. LED's are still expensive here, you don't get good quality ones cheap. I still don't understand the LED craze though. 60 watts equivalent for 10 watt LED, I get that off of compact florescent bulbs, cheaper. 4'tubes are a different matter.

danlb
01-06-2017, 11:57 AM
The CREE no longer use the glass, although I run some of that type inverted and have had no trouble. The newer ones are even better light.



Yep, they moved to a plastic diffuser. The problem with the two globe failures were due to insufficient adhesion. The rim of the glass was perfectly smooth and flame polished. The rim had a little rolled edge so a little more glue would have created a mechanical hold.

I've also noticed the newer CREEs are consuming an extra watt or so over the old ones. Not much difference except that it's almost 10% in some cases. I still like them and recommend them.

Dan

PStechPaul
01-06-2017, 12:18 PM
(1) CFLs are not as environmentally friendly as LEDs, because they contain a small amount of mercury. They are relatively fragile, and the glass tube breaks into hazardous shards that are hard to clean up.

(2) CFLs have a shorter life than LEDs, and must be recycled properly, whereas LEDs are longer-lived and can be discarded or recycled as mostly plastic and aluminum. They can even be repaired if some of the LED chips go bad, although it may not be cost-effective.

(3) LEDs work well in cold temperatures, while CFLs may get very dim and hard to start.

(4) LEDs are available in a wide range of white color temperatures, and can even be obtained in RGB(W) varieties that can be adjusted to whatever color or shade of white you may wish.

(5) LEDs are more easily dimmed, over a wide range (1000:1), and thus can run at much reduced power to save energy and better match your lighting needs.

(6) You can get them in 12V and other low voltages for direct battery use.

(7) The glass tube of CFLs is quite hot to the touch, while LEDs run cooler and are usually mounted inside a bulb that stays cool.

(8) And, finally, they are available in a wider range of bulb shapes and bases.

The only advantage I can think of for CFLs is that they are much cheaper than LEDs now, but I think that is just an effort to squeeze the last drop of profit from the manufacturing setups until LEDs become even cheaper or demand dries up.

J Tiers
01-06-2017, 12:40 PM
CFLs are available in 12V also. I still have a number of them.

As for bulb sizes etc, I have fixtures that only certain CFLs , or regular incandescent bulbs, will fit in. So far NO LED will fit.

CFLs are probably MORE "environmental" than LEDs, since there are fewer semiconductors in them. In an LED bulb there are obviously a lot of LEDs, plus the same amount of power supply as a CFL.

Manufacturing semiconductors takes a large "footprint" of manufacturing base, far more than metal, glass and even plastic. The tiny amount of mercury probably does not counteract that. It's possible that they could be made with a different element in the arc tube, but it would require different phosphors.

mattthemuppet
01-06-2017, 02:23 PM
s'funny, there's been more chat about buying a cheap LED bulb than there has been about making your own. And this being a machining forum and all..

RichR
01-06-2017, 02:33 PM
(2) CFLs have a shorter life than LEDs, and must be recycled properly, whereas LEDs are longer-lived and can be discarded or recycled as mostly plastic and aluminum. They can even be repaired if some of the LED chips go bad, although it may not be cost-effective.
The CFLs I'm currently running are rated for 8000 hours. I've seen LEDs rated at 2000, 5000, 40000, and 50000 hours.


(3) LEDs work well in cold temperatures, while CFLs may get very dim and hard to start.
The CFLs I use are rated down to -20F. They will initially be dimmer when first turned on in the cold but do come up to full brightness (as far as I
can tell) in a few minutes. I have a few in outdoor fixtures and even when it got down to 5F they had no problem starting.


(7) The glass tube of CFLs is quite hot to the touch, while LEDs run cooler and are usually mounted inside a bulb that stays cool.
No, the heat from an led bulb shows up at the base where the LED dice are located which can also get hot to the touch.