PDA

View Full Version : a couple of small spray painting discoveries



metalmagpie
01-17-2017, 12:51 PM
I'm rebuilding an Enerpac hydraulic wedge. I'm at the spray painting part. It's been cold in the Seattle area the last week or so, and my shop's inside temperature is pretty cool. My first tip (for smallish parts, obviously) is to prewarm the parts with a heat gun before painting. Seems to really help with drying.

I often put a part down on some surface I don't care about (like the bottom of an old cardboard box for example), paint one side, let it dry and then turn the part over and paint the other side. I've had problems once I turn the part over, since the paint hasn't fully cured. It usually sticks somewhat to whatever it's been sitting on, so when I lift it up, the finish is marred. This time I tried an experiment, using parchment paper from the kitchen to set the parts on. I believe parchment paper is treated with some dry form of silicone to make it nonstick. Anyway, that worked absolutely perfectly.

I know some of you guys have paint booths and air sprayers and are highly skilled painters. Or maybe you are in the camp where you hang all the parts so you can paint them everywhere in one go. I'm just not there yet, don't know if I'll ever be. These tips are for guys like me, who paint with rattle cans.

metalmagpie

A.K. Boomer
01-17-2017, 01:07 PM
Warm your paint can and contents too --- really helps with getting a finer spray pattern...

Magicniner
01-17-2017, 01:28 PM
You can build a small paint booth inside a large cardboard box with one side with provision for opening for painting and closing for drying, bent wire can be used to support parts off the floor, positive pressure through kitchen extractor fan filters using a fan heater on low temperature works quite well for this,

- NIck

kendall
01-17-2017, 01:28 PM
I'll need to try parchment paper the next time I paint something.

Many of the parts I paint have at least a couple spots that will be contacting something or 'hidden', I normally use drywall screws through a sheet of plywood, positioned so they contact the hidden areas or where a fastener will cover, then paint that side first and flip so the good side is painted last

EddyCurr
01-17-2017, 02:12 PM
... I normally use drywall screws through a sheet of plywood, positioned so they contact the hidden areas or where a fastener will cover, ... There is an approach that is new to me.

A drawback here is having a suitable pc of plywood when necessary, plus the need to lay out & install screws. What I may do is poach your basic idea and overcome these issues by making a collection of stand-offs from pieces of sheetmetal or light plate that have bits of wire or maybe ball bearings attached to them. On demand, these can be brought out of storage and positioned around a flat surface in an appropriate pattern for the current painted part.

Thanks for the inspiration.

.

Paul Alciatore
01-17-2017, 02:25 PM
Do you use the big torch or a smaller one?




Warm your paint can and contents too --- really helps with getting a finer spray pattern...

J Tiers
01-17-2017, 02:37 PM
Just bend a piece of wire and hang it up. if no booth, do it outside.

In cold weather, warm stuff up inside, step outside, hold up part and hook, spray, come back in, hang to dry.

Frank K
01-17-2017, 02:44 PM
I bring the rattle can inside for an hour or so to warm it up and use a piece of waxed paper taped down to cardboard for a painting surface. Nothing sticks to wax paper - not even JB Weld. If parchment paper really is coated with a silicone based compound its the last thing I want contaminating a surface I'm trying to paint.

Paul Alciatore
01-17-2017, 02:55 PM
I'm in the deep south so there are only a few really cold days here each year. My shop in in the attached garage (just off the kitchen) and my wife is sensitive to paint odors so I do my spray painting in my lawn shed, in the back yard. Any painting in the shop must be with latex/water based paints or varnishes.

There is a wall of large shelves in the lawn shed and I have taken over half of one for spray painting. It is covered with cardboard and there are several pieces of cardboard there that I use as improvised turntables so I can spray all sides of a part at one time.

I keep an assortment of nuts, nails, and small strips of wood to use as spacers so the parts do not need to sit directly on the cardboard. It is too easy to form a fillet with the paint and you not only need to break it loose but also sand that edge down to remove the remains of the paint fillet. I keep a roll of baling wire there which is handy for suspending parts with holes in them. That way I can often do a complete, all around coat at one spraying.

I also keep some wax paper so I can lay recently painted parts down on it, but it leaves a dull area. I often just tear small pieces of it to lay between one of my nut-spacers and the recently painted surface that will rest on it. I think I will try the parchment paper: that sounds like a good idea.

Another thing I have done is to organize the rattle cans using some of those plastic mini-crates they sell at Wall-Mart. I stack them sideways on the shelf, forming bins and about six rattle cans will fit in each. This allows me to find the one I want a lot faster.

I plan to install an exhaust fan some day, but for now this shelf is right next to the door and I just leave it open while I am spraying.

In the summer this lawn shed, with the door open or closed, is little short of a paint drying oven. The only problem is the high humidity.

I tried to add some photos, but Photobucket does not seem to be working for me right now.

dave_r
01-17-2017, 03:01 PM
I just hang stuff with wire on my engine lift, then spray away. The floor under it is no longer the original concrete color.

A.K. Boomer
01-17-2017, 03:07 PM
Do you use the big torch or a smaller one?

use a heat gun lol if he does not have he can use a hair dryer

fixerdave
01-17-2017, 03:11 PM
... A drawback here is having a suitable pc of plywood when necessary, plus the need to lay out & install screws. What I may do is poach your basic idea and overcome these issues by making a collection of stand-offs from pieces of sheetmetal or light plate that have bits of wire or maybe ball bearings attached to them. On demand, these can be brought out of storage and positioned around a flat surface in an appropriate pattern for the current painted part. ...

Easiest way to make pointy things to hold stuff up for drying... rip up some short strips of 1/4" ply, or whatever, and use an air-nail gun, 3/4" or so nails, but shoot them through so the pointy end goes into air (hole in the bench or something). Scrap wood, a few nails, and maybe 3 minutes will make all the stand-offs you'll need for the day. When done, bend the nails over and toss them in the bin. No need to store; faster than trying to remember where you put them.

David...

darryl
01-17-2017, 03:29 PM
Been doing some of this myself the past few weeks. I have my spray cans upstairs where they come up to room temp. I shake them really well- actually give them a few shakes whenever I walk by them, then again before spraying. My parts are upstairs as well, so they're warm. Duck outside, spray, give just enough time for solvents to mostly flash off, then duck back inside.

Parchment paper works well. Lately I've been using freezer wrap, the stuff that's coated on one side. That works well too. Parchment paper (or baking paper) is my choice if I'm doing fiberglass or bondo work that has to release. Freezer wrap isn't as good in this regard.

For my last batch of parts, which are magnetic mounting brackets, I can't bake them in the oven so I decided to try what's called appliance epoxy paint. That does seem to have created a more durable finish that is hard and dry, not tacky at all, but we'll see how durable it really is after it's been in use for awhile.

flylo
01-17-2017, 04:04 PM
Depending on the part size, use a big box with a string that holds up the part & runs thru the box, heat the part, carefully slide the box over the part & leave a heat source under the box till the part dries with the part nice & warm with the box over it or use the oven.

Stepside
01-17-2017, 04:13 PM
Parchment paper is so much better than Waxed Paper. 1) it is flat where waxed paper wants to roll up. 2) It is larger than waxed paper

I don't know what the surface treatment is but nothing sticks to it. I have never used it with parts I am painting so I do no know if the surface is silicone.

My wife buys the large box at Costco or at a restaurant supply. The stuff in a "Kitchen Store" is too pricey.

darryl
01-17-2017, 04:20 PM
I believe it is silicon impregnated.

mygrizzly1022
01-17-2017, 04:59 PM
Hi All

For small jobs, what I find very handy are pushpins and a cardboard box. The box is your spray both sized to fit, the push pins are to support the project.
If you take and glue a number of pins together top to top, you wind up with reusable supports that just stick into the bottom of your spray both and the point that is sticking up has small footprint on your project.
Stored in a small plastic jar or the plastic box the came in the can be reused any number of times. I have had my bunch for so long the tops are aluminum and I have not seen those in years.

here are the type of pins I am referring to https://www.google.ca/search?q=push+pins&tbm=isch&imgil=5xQ8Urxflx3xBM%253A%253BRjXHcywfMBicQM%253Bh ttp%25253A%25252F%25252Fwww.publicdomainpictures.n et%

lakeside53
01-17-2017, 05:02 PM
Been doing this for years. Old little ceramic fan heater, BBQ temp fork for the box temp, wooden slat to move over box slot to adjust temperature. Bars across box top to hang wired parts if needed.

I preheat casting etc, spray outside on a hook (no matter the outside temp) and back inside box for drying. 100F for preheat work (can take a while for castings or heavy pieces) and paint cans, then 160F for drying works fine for most rattle can paints. Let items cool before handling as paint will be soft at that temp.


http://i238.photobucket.com/albums/ff150/lakeside53/misc%20linked%20uploads/DSC_5962Medium.jpg (http://s238.photobucket.com/user/lakeside53/media/misc%20linked%20uploads/DSC_5962Medium.jpg.html)

http://i238.photobucket.com/albums/ff150/lakeside53/misc%20linked%20uploads/DSC_5964Medium.jpg (http://s238.photobucket.com/user/lakeside53/media/misc%20linked%20uploads/DSC_5964Medium.jpg.html)

Magicniner
01-17-2017, 05:06 PM
I believe it is silicon impregnated.

That's just rock you know?
Silicone is something entirely different and can cause problems with adhesion and finish in paintwork.

darryl
01-17-2017, 06:13 PM
Baking paper- silicone impregged, cured by catalyst. No rock-

Parchment paper- some kind of cellulose, acid treated for a dense, stick-free surface.

As read on internet.

MikeL46
01-17-2017, 06:24 PM
[QUOTE=Frank K;1093049]I bring the rattle can inside for an hour or so to warm it up [QUOTE]

I sit my spray can in a pan of hot water (~120 degrees). shake it every couple of minutes. After ten minutes it is ready to paint. Warm paint dries much faster than cold paint - warming the part also maybe needed.

Mike

JoeLee
01-17-2017, 06:28 PM
I believe it is silicon impregnated. Silicone is a painters worst enemy.

JL................

JoeLee
01-17-2017, 06:34 PM
I have a couple of electric heat strips that I mounted on adjustable height stands that I made. The heaters are quarts element and are about 26"
long. I can pivot them horizontal or vertical. I usually hang parts in front of one of them, do my painting outside and bring the part back in and hang it in front of the heater. Most small parts I paint I hang off of wire. Depending on the part I may have a piece of wire on each end so I can easily flip the part around when spraying. You have to be creative when it comes to holding parts for painting.

JL.............

elf
01-17-2017, 06:47 PM
Silicone is a painters worst enemy.

JL................

Unless it's been cured.....

p.s. I'm sure you've seen the silicone paint can tops.

JoeLee
01-17-2017, 07:00 PM
Unless it's been cured.....

p.s. I'm sure you've seen the silicone paint can tops. True, but I'm not sure if the silicone on the paper is cured. Could be uncured food grade silicone.

JL...............

1-800miner
01-17-2017, 09:00 PM
Head down to the five and dime or 5$ and 10$ store and buy several sets of jacks. The toy the girls play with, bouncing the rubber ball and picking jacks.
Use the jacks to keep the painted product off the paper. Play with the balls while the paint dries.

wierdscience
01-17-2017, 09:54 PM
Depending on the part size, use a big box with a string that holds up the part & runs thru the box, heat the part, carefully slide the box over the part & leave a heat source under the box till the part dries with the part nice & warm with the box over it or use the oven.

Yup,if I have a bunch of parts to do I'll go down the street to the local appliance store and get either an oven or refrigerator box and use it for a spray booth.If it's cold or humid out I'll cut a hole in one side near the bottom and set an electric space heater blowing hot air in the hole.Works great,paint dries at the proper rate and when it's over,take it out back and throw a match to it.