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polaraligned
01-19-2017, 09:09 AM
Anyone have a trick to loosen these thing up?

I soaked 2 of these 1" Carboloy toolholders in penetrating oil for 4 days. Can't budge the cam. It uses a 1/8" Allen key, and the key will break before the cam lets go. Yes, I am turning in the correct direction as indicated on the toolholder.
I didn't try heating them- yet. I thought for sure the penetrating oil would loosen up any gunk holding the cam tight. I purchased these used and who knows how long they have sat in the current state.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v223/polaraligned/IMG_4530.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/polaraligned/media/IMG_4530.jpg.html)

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v223/polaraligned/IMG_4528.jpg (http://smg.photobucket.com/user/polaraligned/media/IMG_4528.jpg.html)

pinstripe
01-19-2017, 09:20 AM
I recently bought an inserted countersinking tool with a seized screw. Penetrating oil didn't work, even though I wasn't as patient as you. Put some heat on it and squirted a bit of WD40 down the hole (back of the screw). Came off with almost no effort. Insert unharmed, and the oxide coating on the tool is fine as well. Didn't get it red hot or anything like that, but way too hot to touch. WD40 sizzled off.

Not sure how critical the WD40 was, but it was still tight until I gave it a little squirt.

Toolguy
01-19-2017, 10:05 AM
It may be possible that someone tightened it in the opposite direction. If all else fails you can break the insert and get it back in service.

3illmesmart
01-19-2017, 10:31 AM
When I have to deal with this, I put an allen key top and bottom to double the strength and use them at the same time.

becksmachine
01-19-2017, 11:36 AM
Good suggestions so far, especially about breaking the insert, and using 2 keys simultaneously top & bottom.

Another idea would be to just use a punch. The flange on the pin prevents the pin from falling through, but nothing stops it from coming out the top so just use a punch on the bottom and drive it out the top.

Dave

polaraligned
01-19-2017, 12:13 PM
Thank you gentlemen.
I got them out, but not without spinning the hex socket on one of the cams.

The first one, I heated and it ended up coming out when I turned in the "lock" direction. Thanks for that thought Toolguy.

The second one I heated and ended up spinning the allen key in it. So I broke the carbide and still had to use a punch to get it out because it was so impacted with crud. I was worried about breaking the carbide shim, but all is well.

I ordered a couple of new Made in the USA cams from E-bay for less than 5 bucks each. MSC wants over 20 bucks for each.

lakeside53
01-19-2017, 02:49 PM
It happens. I just bust out the insert with a center punch.

becksmachine
01-19-2017, 03:41 PM
Hey, good job! :)

When I actually look at the photo, it becomes obvious that the 2 key approach was a stupid recommendation as there is no socket on the top.

DUH!!

Dave

6PTsocket
01-19-2017, 03:52 PM
I recently bought an inserted countersinking tool with a seized screw. Penetrating oil didn't work, even though I wasn't as patient as you. Put some heat on it and squirted a bit of WD40 down the hole (back of the screw). Came off with almost no effort. Insert unharmed, and the oxide coating on the tool is fine as well. Didn't get it red hot or anything like that, but way too hot to touch. WD40 sizzled off.

Not sure how critical the WD40 was, but it was still tight until I gave it a little squirt.
In a recent test that has been widely quoted, the best "rust buster" turned out to be a home brew of a 50 50 mix of automatic transmission fluid and acetone. It worked better than WD40, PB Blaster, Kroil and an assortment of other commercial products. I hope it bails someone out of trouble. The tightness required to break fasteners loose, after soaking was measured with a torque wrench and the home brew was the clear winner.

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pinstripe
01-19-2017, 04:55 PM
In my post above, I had it sitting in ATF/acetone mix for a few hours and it didn't free it up. Adding heat + WD40 worked. Was it the heat, acetone/ATF, or WD40 that made the difference? Don't know. I think when you have a problem like this, you throw everything at it and hope something works.

Busting the insert was my last resort. It still had three new edges on it, and the "used" edge was almost new.

RichR
01-19-2017, 09:18 PM
I recently bought an inserted countersinking tool with a seized screw. Penetrating oil didn't work, even though I wasn't as patient as you. Put some heat on it and squirted a bit of WD40 down the hole (back of the screw). Came off with almost no effort. Insert unharmed, and the oxide coating on the tool is fine as well. Didn't get it red hot or anything like that, but way too hot to touch. WD40 sizzled off.

Not sure how critical the WD40 was, but it was still tight until I gave it a little squirt.

It's possible a tiny squirt of water would have done the same thing. The screw has a lot less mass than the tool, so it may have cooled and
shrunk a little more than the tool when struck by liquid.

pinstripe
01-20-2017, 01:10 AM
That may well be the case. It made a very nice little "plink" sound as it let go. Not when I sprayed it, but when I put a bit of pressure on the hex key. It probably took a tenth of the force that I had previously applied to free it. I don't think it was going to come off without heat. I had tried to shock the screw with a punch, but it was a difficult shape to hold firmly.

6PTsocket
01-20-2017, 01:02 PM
In my post above, I had it sitting in ATF/acetone mix for a few hours and it didn't free it up. Adding heat + WD40 worked. Was it the heat, acetone/ATF, or WD40 that made the difference? Don't know. I think when you have a problem like this, you throw everything at it and hope something works.

Busting the insert was my last resort. It still had three new edges on it, and the "used" edge was almost new.
Thanks for the feedback. I haven't tried it yet. Your story reminds me of being under pressure at work to solve electronic problems and get back on line. We would replace every possibility and not know what fixed it, which was quicker than careful diagnosis and later go back and figure out what it was. I think it is called shotgunning.

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