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rws
01-22-2017, 06:45 AM
I was given a snow blower two years ago, older fellow felt he couldn't depend on it cause he had to run it on half choke. So he bought one new, and gave it to me. Looks standard, Tecumseh motor, 6 speeds, etc. I took the carb apart, shot some carb cleaner through it all and it runs fairly good. I thought I would get a rebuild kit for the carb, started looking around, and Amazon has NEW carbs for under 16 bucks! No brainer there.

But what else should I be looking at to make sure it keeps going? Never had one before this, and I could kick myself for not! Things usually break when it's not the best time.

OhioDesperado
01-22-2017, 06:53 AM
Because gasoline is now crap I would make sure to put fuel stabilizer in the gas you use for it.
Other than that, it's a simple machine with a lawn mower engine. keep it greased and maintained and it will serve you well.

tincture500
01-22-2017, 07:41 AM
Try to use pure gasoline without ethanol and stabilizer. The alcohol causes corrosion with the pot metal

fjk
01-22-2017, 08:20 AM
There usually are some drive belts to replace periodically

Get the manual for the machine and see what it says

Get extra shear bolts for the auger. Also make sure that you have toe right sized wrenches, etc handy to replace a bolt when one goes


Maybe replace the spark plug

If there's a fuel filter, replace it?
Usually there is no air filter o. These machines

Also, prior to each use, I spray a lot of silicone lube on the business end of the machine to help the snow flow a bit easier.

Check tire inflation

And of course the usual stuff for any machine (are bolts tight, etc, etc)

flylo
01-22-2017, 08:43 AM
Run it out of fuel & use non ethanol available a many airports called MOGAS or many stations as off road gas. You can test but putting water in a jar marking a line at the water level add gas shake then let set & if the water line didn't move means no ethanol as it absorbs water & will raise the water level if ethanol is present.

rws
01-22-2017, 08:50 AM
I am a faithful run it out of gas guy, on everything that doesn't get used often. And I use non-ethanol gas in all my two strokes and this blower. My riding mower gets regular gas, cause I use it year round, pulling a trailer hauling wood, feed, etc.

I was looking for the belt, shear pins, type thing. It's an old model, I'll try to look up a manual.

Oh, and I'm going to fashion some kind of air filter. Can't believe it has none.

alanganes
01-22-2017, 09:39 AM
Around here you can't buy gas without ethanol, outside of going to an airport. That is just enough of a hassle to keep me from doing so.

During the winter when I run my snow blower I use fresh regular gas with some stabilizer/treatments stuff added. When it looks like I'm not going to need it for a while I have started using the canned on the shelf stuff like this:

https://shop.briggsandstratton.com/us/en/canned-fuel

though I get a different brand that is available at the local NAPA store. It's a bit pricey to run the thing on all the time. When I am done using the machine for a while, I run the regular fuel out of it and then put some of this stuff in the tank and run the engine for a few minutes to get the carburetor filled. Seems to work fine and when I next need the machine I just add my regular gas to the tank and go. I find first time start ups are a lot easier and no more gummed up carbs. Do the same on my generator.

I use the premix version of this stuff for my chainsaws, huge improvement as I use them pretty intermittently. I find it worth the extra cost for them to just run them on this stuff, as I don't do a tremendous amount of cutting most of the time.

wdtom44
01-22-2017, 10:19 AM
I haven't had any problem with gas being left in small engines over a period of up to a year. I have been using Startron treatment and I put a little more in than the min. recommended. And I usually don't get around to running it out of gas because I am never sure of the last time I will be using the mower, chain saw, log spliter, tractor, etc. Then I realize I won't be using it again but never get around to getting the gas out and starting it to run out. Maybe I have just been lucky, but so far so good.

Mike279
01-22-2017, 10:34 AM
Snow blowers usually do not have air filters, but instead they have a shroud that helps keep them warm and the blowing snow out. I would put the shroud back on before trying to do a air filter. Check your belts as they can age and then break when you really need them. Remove your rake shear pins and make sure your rakes are free. Leave your shear pins out if they are stuck, you probably won't be able to free them easily. Stuck rakes are the main reason the front gearbox gets broken. Consider shimming your blower wheel if it doesn't throw snow well. The kits use a reinforced rubber material and you attach it to the blower wheel to reduce the clearance to the housing. Especially helpful if you often have wet snow or slush. Mike

BCRider
01-22-2017, 11:46 AM
Try to use pure gasoline without ethanol and stabilizer. The alcohol causes corrosion with the pot metal

I don't know about corrosion but this idea of using gas without any ethanol has been related to me more than once in the past. At least two folks with a lot of small engine background from their work also said that the ethanol led to the gas going stale in the carb sooner and promoting earlier "grungifying" of the carb to form the green sludge. Now that green DOES suggest copper from the brass parts being leached out so it stains the old gas and when it evaporates fully the remaining oily sludge. That used to happen with the old "pure" gasoline though. But it did tend to take longer for it to occur.

I've personally got three engines here now that have issues and need rebuild kits (or new carbs). These are all seasonal use engines and all used fuel stabilizer. Based on the info about possible ethanol issues I'll be going with the higher grade gas from here on out to avoid any ethanol and see if that brings me back to the old days where these seasonal engines did not cause this sort of issue.

Highpower
01-22-2017, 11:57 AM
Oh, and I'm going to fashion some kind of air filter. Can't believe it has none.

Doesn't need one since it's only going to get used in the dead of winter. No dust/dirt/plant pollen blowing around in the air at that time of year.
Now if you plan on mowing your grass with it - that's another story.

CarlByrns
01-22-2017, 02:12 PM
Make sure it has the OEM or OEM style muffler on it. Tecumseh engines are pretty finicky about mufflers- they really don't run well with a universal muffler.

Snowblowers almost never have air cleaners- as mentioned above, the intake air is dust-free and fine powder snow will plug an air filter.

true temper
01-22-2017, 02:31 PM
I was looking for a carb kit , found a new carb for 13 bux. I couldn't buy a kit and primer bulb for that. And it worked good.

Machine
01-22-2017, 02:43 PM
I tried a snowblower for the first time a few years back. I bought a 5hp Craftsman with rubber crawler treads like this one...
http://46.21.154.146/listimg/img1_0416/01/img_Gd4LTVrz22yGNyv.jpg

Lessons learned for me were as follows:

1. Where I live we mostly get wetter or wettish snow. We rarely get "Colorado powder." I found that the 5hp snowblower would frequently get clogged with frozen snow and ice that would accumulate in the nozzle's throat. I had to keep stopping and clearing the nozzle. I can see where a lot of non-mechanically inclined harry homeowners cut their fingers off this way (I used a stick). I thought about fabricating a manifold to put around the nozzle and connect a flex pipe from the muffler to it to continuously deice the throat. Never did though.

2. In an attempt to fix the problem described in #1 (based on internet research), I bolted rubber strips cut from an old garden tractor tire to the impeller blades (as described by someone else earlier). This seals the gaps between the impeller blades and the shroud, improving efficiency and throwing ability. Long story short - it was a lot of effort that helped some, but really didn't fix the problem described in #1.

3. Generally I found the 5hp snowblower to be underpowered for wet or heavier snow. It would throw snow, but it basically acted like it had a prostate problem. Low flow and poor throwing range. And frequent stops because of the ice clogged nozzle. If the snow was dry and powdery, it did an adequate job.

Looking back on it, and after watching many videos of others with various different snowblowers using them in wetter type snow, I would never own one that had less than 10hp. From my experience, power is everything. You need a substantial power margin to overcome the clogging tendencies that occur with underpowered machines struggling with wet snow. The brute force generated by a 10+hp driven impeller should blast the snow right through the nozzle and a hefty distance away from your driveway etc. The bigger machines also have the added benefit of cutting a wider path, equating to less passes to clear a given area. That's the only way for me if I ever get another one.

Since my failed 5hp snowblower experiment, I installed a snow blade on my Gravely 20G tractor and have never looked back. No substitute for physically blading snow off the driveway and mounding up drifts with 20hp hooked up with big ATV type chevron tread tires.

Willy
01-22-2017, 03:41 PM
Snow blowers usually do not have air filters, but instead they have a shroud that helps keep them warm and the blowing snow out. I would put the shroud back on before trying to do a air filter. Check your belts as they can age and then break when you really need them. Remove your rake shear pins and make sure your rakes are free. Leave your shear pins out if they are stuck, you probably won't be able to free them easily. Stuck rakes are the main reason the front gearbox gets broken. Consider shimming your blower wheel if it doesn't throw snow well. The kits use a reinforced rubber material and you attach it to the blower wheel to reduce the clearance to the housing. Especially helpful if you often have wet snow or slush. Mike

Good advice^^^^^^^!

Yes, if you need an air filter while blowing snow, you're doing something wrong.:)
Making sure the the heat stove surrounding the carb is in good repair is half of the battle to ensure trouble free operation. Non ethanol gas is the other, around here everything on the yard gets Chevron 94 which is always dispensed from a dedicated pump. I have close to a dozen small engines on the yard and have had zero fuel related issues with any of them.
I've also found that using a small piece of cloth secured over the vented gas cap with a rubber band prevents snow dust from entering the fuel tank.

I did the snow blower impeller mod on mine a few years ago using 1/2" rubber belting to close up the clearance between the impeller and the housing, made a significant difference. Although the clearance was not bad previously at 1/4"-3/8" and it threw snow not too bad, this improvement was well worth the effort. I can now throw snow on to the neighbor's roof.LOL
I find that reducing the likelihood of clogging is best served by making the unit work to 100% of it's capabilities. When not working very hard mine has always had the tendency to plug up when the snow is warm and wet, speeding things up a bit seems to help a lot. Using exhaust heat to warm the chute is akin to pissing on hell as there simply is not enough heat available to warm the chute enough considering the amount of cold material passing thru the chute.

On the subject of shear pins, make sure that they are free to move slightly in their bores. As mentioned they are the only thing preventing a catastrophic gearbox failure in the event that you find an unwanted surprise in the driveway. Use locknuts on them but do not tighten them up all the way as doing so clamps the auger onto the shaft rendering the shear bolt useless.

rws
01-22-2017, 04:02 PM
I have seen in the past couple years while blowing, that dry snow easily can get sucked right into the carb. Wind blowing, snow blowing, airborne snow. I cannot see any reason why a small air filter would do any harm, and I doubt it will become clogged. I live in VA, it doesn't get below zero hardly at all, so real cold temps where some kind of preheated air isn't really an issue.

And I don't cut grass with it. Or blow leaves.

Willy
01-22-2017, 04:14 PM
Carburetors ice up at temps well above freezing, especially when the air is humid, this is the main reason carburetor equipped engines use some sort of intake air heating device. Look no further than automobiles or airplanes equipped with a carburetor. An air filter will plug up with snow dust and is not required. I have outboard motors that are almost 50 years old, the snow blower engine is about 25 and not an air filter on any of them as it simply is not an issue.

Machine
01-22-2017, 04:19 PM
Using exhaust heat to warm the chute is akin to pissing on hell as there simply is not enough heat available to warm the chute enough considering the amount of cold material passing thru the chute.

Have to disagree with you there. You seem to think the heat has to melt ALL of the snow/ice going through the chute. Not true. Nearly heat the metal around the chute where it's most vulnerable to icing sufficiently to keep ice from sticking to its surface. Exhaust heat from the engine should be more than sufficient for that. As an example, my car defroster doesn't have the power to heat all the moist freezing air/snow/ice flowing over it at 60 mph, but it certainly does have the power to keep the window's surface defrosted simply by heating the glass sufficiently to keep ice from forming on it.

Robg
01-22-2017, 04:46 PM
Hey Machine - I have the exact same snow blower! I bought it used 20 years ago when I moved to the house I'm in now which has a driveway long enough to park about 6 or 7 cars bumper to bumper and still be able to access the detached garage at the end.
Anyway, I had problems with it after a while where I had to keep the choke on half way or it wouldn't run right, always figured I'd look at the problem later and then winter was over and didn't get to it. The primer bulb quit working so I got a new one and when I went to put it on, I found the hose was cracked at the bulb connection. So, nice vacuum leak & the need to run rich with the choke. Fixed that and now all is well.
I also don't have much luck with it when spring approaches and the snow gets heavy & wet. So I don't use it then but soon it's spring anyway.

Willy
01-22-2017, 04:55 PM
Have to disagree with you there. You seem to think the heat has to melt ALL of the snow/ice going through the chute. Not true. Nearly heat the metal around the chute where it's most vulnerable to icing sufficiently to keep ice from sticking to its surface. Exhaust heat from the engine should be more than sufficient for that. As an example, my car defroster doesn't have the power to heat all the moist freezing air/snow/ice flowing over it at 60 mph, but it certainly does have the power to keep the window's surface defrosted simply by heating the glass sufficiently to keep ice from forming on it.

I realize that not all of the snow needs to melt for the heat to be effective it's just that the is not enough heat available. Heck I've tried and if anything it made the chute more prone to plugging. However it would thaw out quick when the snowblower was not actively being used.

The windshield analogy is a good example. I used to work for a highways maintenance contractor for the last 15 years and when using a front mounted snow plow during heavy snow falls it was standard operating procedure to turn the defroster off due to the amount of blowing snow coming off of the front plow.
Keeping the windshield cold kept the windshield free of snow as it simply slid off. On the other hand when it the defroster was engaged visibility was reduced to zero within a mile as there simply was not enough heat to deal with the amount of snow hitting the window.

But go ahead and devise a system and let us know how it works. I think there is a reason you don't see this approach being used successfully in commercial applications.
Personally I think a non-stick coating would be a more effective solution to prevent ice from bonding to the chute.

J Tiers
01-22-2017, 05:00 PM
Willy is right.... try to melt any of it and it will plug up fast. Some seem to plug up with wet snow.

Basically why I bagged it and use a shovel. Slower, but when the machine is not cooperating, it may be faster, and not much more work than fighting with the machine.

Mister ED
01-22-2017, 05:02 PM
As has been said don't waste your time trying to configure an air filter. Snow blowers & snowmobiles (older ones anyways) don't need them and performance can actually be hindered. Actually, never seen an outboard with one either.

Another thing to look at is the scraper blade and skid shoes. Check for wear and adjust according to the type of substrate you will be clearing (gravel vs pavement).

Machine
01-22-2017, 05:06 PM
Hey Machine - I have the exact same snow blower! I bought it used 20 years ago when I moved to the house I'm in now which has a driveway long enough to park about 6 or 7 cars bumper to bumper and still be able to access the detached garage at the end. Anyway, I had problems with it after a while where I had to keep the choke on half way or it wouldn't run right, always figured I'd look at the problem later and then winter was over and didn't get to it. The primer bulb quit working so I got a new one and when I went to put it on, I found the hose was cracked at the bulb connection. So, nice vacuum leak & the need to run rich with the choke. Fixed that and now all is well. I also don't have much luck with it when spring approaches and the snow gets heavy & wet. So I don't use it then but soon it's spring anyway.

Hey that's cool you had one too. I mean it was a neat little snowblower. I really liked the tracks because I like anything with tracks. ;) And I thought about keeping it and putting a much bigger engine on it. I thought it would be a hoot to squeeze a 10hp Honda motor on it. I'm sure it would have shot snow into the next county if I did that. But I thought it would probably make short work of the little gearbox it had between the impeller and auger, which obviously was only designed for the half the power. Being up in Canada I suspect it works ok for you most of the year. But heck up in the great white north I'd think you'd want one like this...


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zvR-eaKUVqU

rws
01-22-2017, 05:08 PM
Well I've never had a carb ice up. I run my lawn mower pulling a trailer to move split wood around, run my wood splitter and have run my generator all in the same kind of weather, all of them has an air cleaner.

Machine
01-22-2017, 05:19 PM
Heck I've tried and if anything it made the chute more prone to plugging. However it would thaw out quick when the snowblower was not actively being used. But go ahead and devise a system and let us know how it works. I think there is a reason you don't see this approach being used successfully in commercial applications. Personally I think a non-stick coating would be a more effective solution to prevent ice from bonding to the chute.

If you already tried it, I'll take your word for it when you say it doesn't work. I think I did see where there are certain snowblowers that do have that feature though (if memory serves). I never did bother trying as I could see multiple easier and simpler solutions. Either get a much more powerful snowblower or simply use a blade for my tractor. I decided to get a plow for my tractor and it's been perfect. Plus the plow doesn't have an engine I have to fuss over and change the oil, clean the carb, worry about stale gas/ethanol etc. And I can leave it outside all the time and it doesn't take up any valuable storage space in my shed or garage.

As always, YMMV.

Puckdropper
01-22-2017, 07:44 PM
That's why I leave the shovel outside. Cold metal means the snow is less likely to stick. Maybe I should leave the blower outside for a few minutes before I start it.

There's a non-stick spray that works pretty well. My blower's a little underpowered, especially in the wet heavy stuff, but the non-stick spray helps quite a bit. I think it's called snow and ice repellent.

Errol Groff
01-22-2017, 08:22 PM
I saw this neat turbo charged snow blower at the Cranberry Flywheelers show in 2013. Maybe this would do the job?

http://i141.photobucket.com/albums/r42/Errol_Groff/DSC01281.jpg (http://s141.photobucket.com/user/Errol_Groff/media/DSC01281.jpg.html)

Errol Groff

rws
01-23-2017, 06:21 AM
That will never work, it has an air cleaner.

CarlByrns
01-23-2017, 07:44 AM
Using exhaust heat to warm the chute is akin to pissing on hell as there simply is not enough heat available to warm the chute enough considering the amount of cold material passing thru the chute.


If that worked, every manufacturer would do it. On the large (48 inch and up) tractor-driven snowblowers we sell, one company used to install replaceable Delrin sheets in the chute area- those machines never clogged.

I live in the snow belt and a common hack when moving wet snow is to spray the chute with wax or even cooking spray to keep the snow from sticking. It works well, but you will have to reapply cooking spray fairly often.

Dan Dubeau
01-23-2017, 09:10 AM
Crazy carpet is a near perfect material to line the chute with. Easy to cut, and pop rivet on. Cheap enough to replace on a yearly basis if you blow a gravel driveway. Use banding strap as a "washer" on the other side to add some strength along the edges.

I bought one of those china carbs for my 8hp Tecumseh, but have yet to finish putting it back together. Came down with the flu over the weekend, and only got out of bed to go hold down the couch. We'll see how it works this week if I get a chance to go play with it.

rws
01-23-2017, 10:29 AM
In the last two winters I have used this, I haven't had any clogging issues. Knocking on wood here. I still have to shovel around the vehicles, but I use the blower as much as possible. Once I have some working room, my L2550 4x4 with loader gets the rest! :)

Willy
01-23-2017, 10:57 AM
That will never work, it has an air cleaner.


There is a very good reason that most manufactures of snowblowers do not equip their machines with air filters and that is to prevent plugging of the filter element when the snow is dry. Remember these folks have built literally millions of units for many years and for all conditions. If you do not experience those conditions you'll probably not have any issues.

I'm still left wondering though what the purpose of an air filer would be on a snowblower engine???

CarlByrns
01-23-2017, 12:14 PM
There is a very good reason that most manufactures of snowblowers do not equip their machines with air filters and that is to prevent plugging of the filter element when the snow is dry. Remember these folks have built literally millions of units for many years and for all conditions. If you do not experience those conditions you'll probably not have any issues.

I'm still left wondering though what the purpose of an air filer would be on a snowblower engine???

The engine in the picture has a turbo (!) so an air filter would be a necessary evil. Also, the filter looks like a Donaldson- they work well with snow.

Willy
01-23-2017, 01:52 PM
The engine in the picture has a turbo (!) so an air filter would be a necessary evil. Also, the filter looks like a Donaldson- they work well with snow.

Yes thanks Carl I noticed, anything with a turbo needs a filter to preclude the possibility of ingesting foreign material that will probably take out the compressor side of the turbine. All it would take is one piece of ice to destroy the turbo.
My comments weren't actually directed at the unit in question as it is a one-off curio built only as exercise of someone's fabrication skill and does not represent mainstream products aimed at what is practical and functional.

On the Western Star snow plow trucks that I used to operate a lot of the trucks were equipped with two large external Donaldsons on each side of the cowl between the cab and the rear of the hood. When front plows were mounted for a storm it was required to change the air cleaner's source of intake air from external air to warm snow-free under hood air. Failure to do so would leave you dead in the water very soon and also possibly ruining two expensive filter elements.

The one in the photo if properly shielded may fare better but in it's current location it is doubtful in dry snow conditions.

rws
01-23-2017, 04:45 PM
It just goes against my grain to run an engine without an air filter. I see where it could easily suck snow flakes in. If I find the filter clogs with snow, I can take it off.

I just don't buy into the pre heat issue where I live. If I were father north, it may be a different issue.

MattiJ
01-23-2017, 05:06 PM
Run it out of fuel & use non ethanol available a many airports called MOGAS or many stations as off road gas. You can test but putting water in a jar marking a line at the water level add gas shake then let set & if the water line didn't move means no ethanol as it absorbs water & will raise the water level if ethanol is present.

Do you have alkylate gasoline available? Here it has been widely available for couple of years and I really like it. It's a lot more expensive but works well and you can use it even in your camp stove.

There is 4-stroke alkylate gasoline and 2-stroke ready-mix, Aspen (or Neste Oil) is a common around here.
http://www.aspenfuel.co.uk/clean-facts/alkylate-petrol/uses-for-aspen/for-lawnmowers/

Willy
01-23-2017, 05:44 PM
It just goes against my grain to run an engine without an air filter. I see where it could easily suck snow flakes in. If I find the filter clogs with snow, I can take it off.

I just don't buy into the pre heat issue where I live. If I were father north, it may be a different issue.

Hey I agree 100%.
If I lived along a busy thoroughfare with lots of traffic and the accompanying dust and brown snow that goes with it I'd find a way to make an air cleaner work. A little bit of ice dust ingested does no harm, dry dirty snow would be a quick death. As it is I live in a rural area with dry snow mostly and the area cleaned is roughly 10,000 sq. ft. so I know it's an issue here.

You may not even use your machine long enough in dry dusty snow for this to even be an issue. The only point I wished to address is that it can be, this and the fact that when it snows the air is usually clean, hence the reason most snow throwers do not have air filters installed.

I have experienced carb icing conditions numerous times with different pieces of equipment that did not have supplemental carb heat and they have all occurred at temps well above freezing when the air was moist. Cold air is usually dry so this not as much of an issue in really cold weather. It does take a certain level of conditions to exist for the issue to manifest itself.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carburetor_icing


Carburetor Icing, or carb icing, is an icing condition which can affect any carburetor under certain atmospheric conditions. The problem is most notable in certain realms of aviation.

Carburetor icing occurs when there is humid air, and the temperature drop in the venturi causes the water vapor to freeze. The venturi effect can drop the ambient air temperature by 30-40 degrees F, therefore carburetor icing often occurs when the outside air temperature is in the 60-70 degree F range. Unfortunately, the warm air temperature often causes pilots to overlook the possibility of carb icing. The ice will form on the surfaces of the carburetor throat, further restricting it. This may increase the Venturi effect initially, but eventually restricts airflow, perhaps even causing a complete blockage of air to the carburetor. The engine begins to run more rich as ice formation increases. Without intervention (carb heat or leaning) this can only continue until the mixture is outside of the "chemically correct" range for combustion. Icing may also cause jamming of the mechanical parts of the carburetor, such as the throttle, typically a butterfly valve.

While it applies to all carburetors, carburetor icing is of particular concern in association with piston-powered aircraft, especially small, single-engine, light aircraft. Aircraft powered by carbureted engines are equipped with carburetor heat systems to overcome the icing problem. In cars, carburetor icing can occasionally be a nuisance. The inlet manifold and parts of the carburetor often have warm water from the cooling system or exhaust gas circulating through them to combat this problem. Motorcycles can also suffer from carburetor icing, although some engine designs are more susceptible to it than others. Air-cooled engines may be more prone to icing, due to the absence of warm coolant circulating through the engine.

CarlByrns
01-23-2017, 05:55 PM
It just goes against my grain to run an engine without an air filter. I see where it could easily suck snow flakes in. If I find the filter clogs with snow, I can take it off.

I just don't buy into the pre heat issue where I live. If I were father north, it may be a different issue.

Icing can occur at room temperature. I had a car running in a nice warm (68 degree) shop that built ice at idle- you could watch a little icicle grow above the throttle plate (GM single point fuel injection). The throttle body had a venturi profile and got quite cold.

Icing can be very tough to diagnose because a) it doesn't take much ice to cause drivability problems and b) by the time you get the air cleaner off, the ice has melted away.

fjk
01-23-2017, 06:04 PM
...
If I lived along a busy thoroughfare with lots of traffic and the accompanying dust and brown snow that goes with it I'd find a way to make an air cleaner work.

I agree that it seems wrong not to have some kind of filter,
but i live in an inner suburb of Boston and the air is not exactly pristine (heavily
traveled interstates within a few miles, a couple of city bus routes within 1/4 mile,
lots of sand and salt in the goop that the city so generously dumps at the foot
of the driveway after every storm, etc) but I have not had a problem so I have to
say that reality trumps beliefs.

frank

rws
01-23-2017, 06:10 PM
OK, let it go, we have beat this thing to death.