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View Full Version : youtube video 50 ton shop press build. Question



Axkiker
01-23-2017, 07:18 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f2xlAWytx9g


I watch this guys videos on occasion and being that I want to build a press I watched this from start to finish. Over all it seems to be built way heavier than it needed to be and I like that. What I don't understand is his method of attaching the hydraulic cylinder. Isnt mounting in this manor causing a number of issues. For starters it required the unit to be way taller than it needed to be. Secondly it just seems to put the cylinder under an extreme amount of leverage if something were to get kinked sideways under load. Wouldn't it had made more sense to mount the cylinder at the front and allow the back portion to extend upward ?

Maybe there is something im just not understanding. Maybe it was just due to the fact that he had that cylinder or it was given to him.

Boostinjdm
01-23-2017, 08:28 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f2xlAWytx9g


I watch this guys videos on occasion and being that I want to build a press I watched this from start to finish. Over all it seems to be built way heavier than it needed to be and I like that. What I don't understand is his method of attaching the hydraulic cylinder. Isnt mounting in this manor causing a number of issues. For starters it required the unit to be way taller than it needed to be. Secondly it just seems to put the cylinder under an extreme amount of leverage if something were to get kinked sideways under load. Wouldn't it had made more sense to mount the cylinder at the front and allow the back portion to extend upward ?

Maybe there is something im just not understanding. Maybe it was just due to the fact that he had that cylinder or it was given to him.

It's not. From my experience building a 20 ton, 30+ ton, and a much larger 100+ ton press, that frame is not going to remain straight long term. Maybe not even short term.

Doozer
01-23-2017, 08:39 PM
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41zhRfRqqgL._SX342_.jpg

This is how you should mount the cylinder.
From the front, as not to add the cylinder into the stack column height.
Too high a column and it is easy to buckle.
And this Chuckie character is not someone to take engineering ques from.
If that is not self-evident, I can't help you.
--Doozer

deltap
01-23-2017, 09:12 PM
Look for a design with open sides that will make it more versatile as in straightening long parts.

quasi
01-23-2017, 09:33 PM
that Chuckie gives me a headache.

Boostinjdm
01-23-2017, 09:36 PM
Look for a design with open sides that will make it more versatile as in straightening long parts.

I chuckle to myself everytime i see that comment. While it does have some merit, especially with smaller presses, you already have two big open sides. Most of the fixible bends I have come across required working a fairly short portion regardless of total material length. Usually around a foot or so between supports.

cijuanni
01-23-2017, 11:34 PM
It's not. From my experience building a 20 ton, 30+ ton, and a much larger 100+ ton press, that frame is not going to remain straight long term. Maybe not even short term.

Yep, it doesn't pay to go skimpy on a press frame.

I am making my 100 tonner with HSS 6x10x5/8 thick rectangular tubing, with four 1x4 flats welded to them and four 1 1/4" plate x 18" cross pieces. Plus a few stiffeners.

boaterri
01-24-2017, 12:14 AM
That's an hour and 20 minutes of my life I will never get back. Best part of video was showing the new "compression algorithm" for hard drive data.

Rick

wierdscience
01-24-2017, 12:35 AM
If he wanted box sections for uprights,he should have just bought some 6x8x 1/2 tube and been done with it.For what he has in materials and welding he would have had change leftover just buying the tube instead of fabricating them.

The cross members are too light,10" or even 8" channel would have been a better pick.In part 5 he's crushing a piece of tubing and the bed can be seen deflecting a bunch.

He wasted a whole bunch of daylight mounting the cylinder that way.The same company he got that cylinder/pump combo from has threaded gland cylinders for very little more.You want as much daylight as possible,there have been many times I have needed more and not had it.

wierdscience
01-24-2017, 12:43 AM
I chuckle to myself everytime i see that comment. While it does have some merit, especially with smaller presses, you already have two big open sides. Most of the fixible bends I have come across required working a fairly short portion regardless of total material length. Usually around a foot or so between supports.

"Most" that's just it,when a long part does come along,and they do,it sucks not to have that feature,it usually ends up with a length of H-beam spanning the bed the narrow way and a bunch of blocking,which isn't the best option.

Boostinjdm
01-24-2017, 01:33 AM
"Most" that's just it,when a long part does come along,and they do,it sucks not to have that feature,it usually ends up with a length of H-beam spanning the bed the narrow way and a bunch of blocking,which isn't the best option.

I run long shafts diagonally across my table. That's what I was getting at. Add in a second guy or a stand to support the free end while you work and you're in business. I think the longest shaft I've done was 14 or 16 feet, but like I said earlier, the bend was only over a short section of it.

MattiJ
01-24-2017, 02:36 AM
I agree with others that it's NOT heavy build for the size. While it may hold together under load it will flex alot and its not a good thing.
Press frame with lots of flex under 50 tons is same as a 50 ton crossbow when something finally lets loose or breaks. Sometimes scary as hell even with less flexible press...

Axkiker
01-24-2017, 10:22 AM
well I stand corrected. I thought based on the size material he was using it was pretty stout. I just thought the way he mounted the cylinder to be crazy.

Ohio Mike
01-24-2017, 05:44 PM
I got a far as seeing who the YouTube creator was and I closed the window and moved on...