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tlfamm
02-22-2017, 10:25 AM
The mother of all physics texts, under development for 25 years, is available in a new, 2017 edition. Downloadable free:


A single, 400Mb download:
http://www.motionmountain.net/MM.zip

Individual downloads for each of the 6 volumes can be found on this page:
http://www.motionmountain.net/


A history of the project can be found here:
http://www.motionmountain.net/project.html

JRouche
02-22-2017, 07:02 PM
Thanks.. JR

tomato coupe
02-22-2017, 08:04 PM
The mother of all physics texts, under development for 25 years, is available in a new, 2017 edition. Downloadable free:


A single, 400Mb download:
http://www.motionmountain.net/MM.zip

Individual downloads for each of the 6 volumes can be found on this page:
http://www.motionmountain.net/


A history of the project can be found here:
http://www.motionmountain.net/project.html

I highly recommend the Feynman Lectures instead:

http://www.feynmanlectures.caltech.edu/

aostling
02-22-2017, 09:07 PM
I highly recommend the Feynman Lectures instead:

http://www.feynmanlectures.caltech.edu/

I have the Feynman Lectures, volumes 1 & 2. Why do you recommend these over the Motion Mountain project?

tomato coupe
02-22-2017, 09:38 PM
I have the Feynman Lectures, volumes 1 & 2. Why do you recommend these over the Motion Mountain project?

Feynman was very good at explaining concepts, and then tying them to the real world. I think his lectures are pretty well organized.

I downloaded one volume of the Motion Mountain text, and read about a dozen pages. I noticed errors in many of the paragraphs, and some truly bizarre sections:

"Trees have a special relation to electricity. When a tree is cut, a viscous resin appears. With time it solidifies and, after millions of years, it forms amber. When amber is rubbed with a cat fur, it acquires the ability to attract small objects, such as saw dust or pieces of paper."

Okaaay .... I guess that means cats also have a special relation to electricity. (Unless, of course, the breed is a Sphynx.)

aostling
02-22-2017, 10:03 PM
I see what you mean.

I confess to knowing nothing about the Motion Mountain project. I hope most of the sections are better than the one you quote.

Evan
02-22-2017, 10:20 PM
Will have a look a MM. The Feynman lectures are excellent. I also have a full set of the mechanical engineering lectures by Alexander Slocum from MIT. Unfortunately, last I checked they are no longer available.

loose nut
02-23-2017, 09:00 AM
Under development for 25 years. Doesn't that mean that all the earlier stuff is now out of date so won't they need top update and revise it. Maybe in another 25 years.................

Fasttrack
02-23-2017, 09:57 AM
Yeah... read the "Motion Mountain" text with caution. The author is a bit of a crackpot and, although the basics are there, they are interlaced with his own "strand theory" and personal bias. (He even purports to explain emotion through quantum mechanics). There are MUCH better free texts out there. Also, many top-notch universities are now offering free online courses and video lectures to the general public.

E.g. https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/physics/

Evan
02-23-2017, 12:20 PM
He even purports to explain emotion through quantum mechanics

That particular part is very much in the "news" these days in anything to do with brain research. Not just emotion but the way our brains operate in general. It isn't a goofy idea either. There are a lot of doubters but the ideas just won't go away. It makes too much sense.

https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg22830500-300-is-quantum-physics-behind-your-brains-ability-to-think/


Physicist Roger Penrose, of the University of Oxford, and anesthesiologist Stuart Hameroff, of the University of Arizona, propose that the brain acts as a quantum computer

http://www.livescience.com/37807-brain-is-not-quantum-computer.html

tomato coupe
02-23-2017, 12:32 PM
He even purports to explain emotion through quantum mechanics


That particular part is very much in the "news" these days in anything to do with brain research. Not just emotion but the way our brains operate in general. It isn't a goofy idea either. There are a lot of doubters but the ideas just won't go away. It makes too much sense.

I'm definitely a believer. In fact, every time I read an article about it I go into a superposition of two quantum states -- one that wants to laugh, and one that wants to cry.

Evan
02-23-2017, 12:43 PM
What amazes me is to do with the work I am doing. The "clock speed" of the brain is far higher than we realized. Significant events take place in a few milliseconds and that is constant across the entire brain at once. The entire brain will frequently suddenly synchronize in just a few ms. How the heck does that happen? It doesn't fit very well with the usual theories of neural communication.

Joel
02-23-2017, 04:39 PM
I go into a superposition of two quantum states -- one that wants to laugh, and one that wants to cry.
But we don't know which, until we open the box...

loose nut
02-23-2017, 05:57 PM
OK so whose head do we crack open.:eek:

Georgineer
02-24-2017, 05:18 AM
OK so whose head do we crack open.:eek:

No need to crack anything. You just need somebody with an open mind.

George

batt-man
02-24-2017, 07:32 AM
Will have a look a MM. The Feynman lectures are excellent. I also have a full set of the mechanical engineering lectures by Alexander Slocum from MIT. Unfortunately, last I checked they are no longer available.

Evan - would these be the lectures your talking about?

http://web.mit.edu/2.75/fundamentals/FUNdaMENTALS.html


Cheers
Batt

Evan
02-24-2017, 11:16 AM
Not sure if that is the same. The ones I have has 21 chapters.

Paul Alciatore
02-24-2017, 03:25 PM
A curious statement. The entire brain synchronizes? Just what does that mean? Although not an expert on the brain, I was under the impression that different areas of the brain were responsible for different things. Does a speech area synchronize with a visual area and a muscular control area that wiggles the little toe? Do they somehow aid each other when extra processing is needed? Hey you taste recognition area, he isn't eating now so help me figure out what he is saying.

Just what does this mean.

By the way, I am sure that you understand the time frame of milliseconds (ms) but others may not. The brain does not transmit neural messages at the speed of light or even a significant fraction of it as an electronic computer does. But even at the speed of sound, an impulse can travel 14 inches or even more in a millisecond (ms). Sound waves are one of the slowest forms of transmission that we know of - USPS excepted. Most of our brains are less than seven inches across so traversing that distance in a millisecond is not a real mystery. At least, not to me. A millisecond is an eternity in the world of information transmission. I don't know about you, but I have routinely made measurements and adjustments that were a million times finer than that. To me the real mystery here is just what do you and apparently others mean by "synchronizes"?

Just what is synchronized? A muscular response to a visual or aural stimulus? Again, it was my understanding that some responses are not even dependent on the brain. Sudden and intense pain can trigger a muscular response before the brain is even aware of it. Some processing is done on a more local basis. Pull that hand off that hot stove NOW, don't wait for that slow brain to tell you to do it.

But perhaps my knowledge is dated. So enlighten me.




What amazes me is to do with the work I am doing. The "clock speed" of the brain is far higher than we realized. Significant events take place in a few milliseconds and that is constant across the entire brain at once. The entire brain will frequently suddenly synchronize in just a few ms. How the heck does that happen? It doesn't fit very well with the usual theories of neural communication.

Evan
02-24-2017, 05:06 PM
I will be making a video to show this since I am now scheduled to assist the prof in a lecture in front of about 50 people of the general public. It is a part of the Continuing Education Program here. Looks like I am getting a bit more than knee deep in this. He wants me to make videos that he can use for these lectures as well as on TV. When I get this done I will post it here or at least a link to it if I have his permission, which I am sure is ok.

We are discussing just who has full rights, which is currently me except for any of the data. I don't usually make my work open source but this may be an exception. If I do I will post a link to it when it becomes available. Not at all sure about any real data though, I will most likely have to include "fake" data that looks very similar.

As for the sync, it is not about any sort of muscular actions. That is heavily filtered out since muscles, even eye blinks, create a signal a hundred times greater than the brain. This is very strictly brain only neural activity. The person they are reading must sit very still and try to avoid moving their eyes or even eyelids especially. The eyes have a bipolar field and it is quite strong and any muscles are even stronger.

What happens in the brain is what looks like random signals that within just a few milliseconds suddenly synchronise when any sort of decision is made. It is the coolest thing to watch. But to see it I must slow it down by about a factor of 20 or so since real time is far too fast for the monitor refresh rate, never mind our visual capabilities. This is where my work is so fascinating, both to me and the prof. Staring at squiggly lines on paper just doesn't get it across but when you see it in action it suddenly becomes clear what is really happening. All of a sudden the entire brain turns bright red. We use the rainbow as the colour code. That is standard practice. I never get tired of seeing it even though I have now seen it a thousand times. The front half of the brain is the first to sync in a few ms and it then sometimes forms a very fast wave across the entire brain to the back. Total time is maybe 10 to 20 ms. It can be faster depending on how the data is presented. It is common to use averages of many people. A single person is much faster.

When I say "decision" I mean things like "Is this something I like" down to "Is it time to breath again".

I have added all sorts of capabilities to the software that make is very easy to show any part of the data any way you wish including a very nice 2D print function that he wants to use for his research papers. I will most likely get to have my name in those papers. That will be neat to see.

There is other software available that does similar things to what I am doing but none of it is able to run in anything close to real time. Mine is the only one that can load the data in few seconds and then show it immediately at any speed you want. One can also switch to any of the channels just by clicking on the electrodes on the cap simulation and it charts it instantly will full control of the display system. Then you can sweep across the new chart in either direction, super fast or at any speed you want. Stop, and the gain can be adjusted to fit the data and also change the display range, together or separately. The simulated cap can be rotated in two axes without changing the camera view. I tried to make the cap and brain mouse draggable but it required too much computation and was just too slow. It did work though. I also added a cute trick just because it looks good. If you swing the brain/cap around it also swings through the data stream. My math is coming back nicely.

I'm not sure I mentioned but I now have the colour changing code running at 40,000 changes per second. Ruby shouldn't be able to do that. I have Ruby pretty well figured out plus some.

I neglected to mention that my lab lecture is put off again but it will be next Friday for sure. He is running out of time for the public lecture. He is a very busy man. (I will be assisting him at the public lecture)

Not sure if this link will work outside of Canada but this is the professor's TV show:

http://www.cbc.ca/player/play/854454851605

Evan
02-24-2017, 05:35 PM
At least, not to me. A millisecond is an eternity in the world of information transmission.

While the neurons use electrical signals (sort of) the synapses do not. A synapse operates by "squirting" a chemical neurotransmitter across the synapse from the axonal side that is then absorbed in the dendrite. That is the very comparatively slow part. That happens at all of the billion and billions of synapses in the brain. Our brains are not fully electronic, they are also chemical.

Here is a list of velocities. It is in meters per second, 0.5 to 120.


Pull that hand off that hot stove NOW, don't wait for that slow brain to tell you to do it.

That is a reflex action and does not include the brain directly. But it still takes at least 100 milliseconds. It is also far higher voltage, millivolts, not microvolts.