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View Full Version : OT: Dymo1000 labels



NiftyNev
02-25-2017, 07:08 PM
The Dymo1000 labels it seems are not available now, as the newer label makers use a cartridge with a different shape. I have found some here - http://www.inkcartridges.com/printer-more-brands-dymo-1000-parts-cartridges-7827# - that I think are what I need. My question is, does anyone here have the Dymo1000 and use these? Also need to know if the Australian version of the label maker uses the same cartridge? I don't see why not, but would like to know for sure. I contacted them but they do not know if they are compatable, so do not ship to Australia. Would anyone here also be interested in getting a quote for me to ship some to Australia, if I pay by Paypal? Thanks for any help I can get on this.

JoeLee
02-25-2017, 10:55 PM
Your going back in time. I still have one of these........... Not sure if the tape is available any more.

JL.............

http://img0.etsystatic.com/000/0/5990018/il_570xN.169671630.jpg

J Tiers
02-25-2017, 11:43 PM
Those things seemed like such a good idea back then. At least before you used them.

By now, nearly every label ever applied with one has probably dried up and popped off. Most of them here have. The adhesive gets dry and no longer sticky. And I never really liked the look of the label they made, YMMV. Sometimes the label was too stiff for the adhesive and it raised up as it relaxed back to its coiled up shape, and maybe fell off.

I'd switch to something else. You can get (here, anyhow) a lot of label types that can be easily printed up on a computer (or hand written) and stuck on. With a white background, I find them a lot more legible than most of the Dymo.

If you already have a whole system based on Dymo, OK, I can see that.

danlb
02-26-2017, 12:30 AM
I have to agree with Jerry. There are lots of nice labeler systems out there now. I'm partial to the Brother P-Touch systems but have not looked into the comparable systems by Dymo and others.

The problem we had with the P-touch labels was that I wanted to label all the cables and cords for our various devices. Our cat, who had never touched a cord in his life, developed a taste for the labels and shredded most of them.

Dan

JoeLee
02-26-2017, 01:02 AM
Those things seemed like such a good idea back then. At least before you used them.

By now, nearly every label ever applied with one has probably dried up and popped off. Most of them here have. The adhesive gets dry and no longer sticky. And I never really liked the look of the label they made, YMMV. Sometimes the label was too stiff for the adhesive and it raised up as it relaxed back to its coiled up shape, and maybe fell off.

I'd switch to something else. You can get (here, anyhow) a lot of label types that can be easily printed up on a computer (or hand written) and stuck on. With a white background, I find them a lot more legible than most of the Dymo.

If you already have a whole system based on Dymo, OK, I can see that. They were really cool at the time, 60's maybe ???
Mine takes the 1/4" tape and yes curling / raising up and popping off was a common problem, I remember it well. It seemed to be less of an issue with the larger width tapes.

I've since graduated to a P-Touch. Much better but still some undesirable issues.

JL............

darryl
02-26-2017, 01:17 AM
Some of the 'guns' work better than others, seemingly spacing the letters more appropriately. I still use mine- what I've done to make them look a little better is to mill a recess into the faceplate or panel being labeled- (has to have some thickness to it obviously to enable this)- using a 1/4 inch endmill. Then cut the strip to length and round the corners before pressing it into the recess. Looks much better I think. I do like the Brother system though-

ahidley
02-26-2017, 02:30 AM
It apears as there is lots of it for sale on eBay

MattiJ
02-26-2017, 03:37 AM
I have to agree with Jerry. There are lots of nice labeler systems out there now. I'm partial to the Brother P-Touch systems but have not looked into the comparable systems by Dymo and others.

The problem we had with the P-touch labels was that I wanted to label all the cables and cords for our various devices. Our cat, who had never touched a cord in his life, developed a taste for the labels and shredded most of them.

Dan

+1 vote for P-touch labels. Very durable, adhesive sticks to almost anything and seem to be reasonably resistant to oils and solvents. Especially nice if you have one of the more serious professional printers with twice the resolution compared to normal models.
My only complaint is the label prices locally, less than half the price if I order from Germany.

sandiapaul
02-26-2017, 07:23 AM
"By now, nearly every label ever applied with one has probably dried up and popped off"

Not in my experience...in fact just the opposite. At the university where I work one of my predecessors was very fond of using the Dymo. It take a LOT of effort to remove these labels, some I know for a fact were put on 25 years ago. Mant that come off leave behind a sticky residue that has to be cleaned off. I was pretty impressed with how well they held up. I have the machine but can't find the tape anymore, so went with a Dymo Rhino one, it seems to be OK, but I prefer the 3D effect of the old ones.

6PTsocket
02-26-2017, 10:11 AM
+1 vote for P-touch labels. Very durable, adhesive sticks to almost anything and seem to be reasonably resistant to oils and solvents. Especially nice if you have one of the more serious professional printers with twice the resolution compared to normal models.
My only complaint is the label prices locally, less than half the price if I order from Germany.
I have a discontined P Touch that besides being able to import a whole library of symbols from a computer, can actually print any image you choose, via the computer and cable. Granted, the resolution is not high. I don't know if there is a current replacement.

Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

J Tiers
02-26-2017, 10:59 AM
Not in my experience...in fact just the opposite. At the university where I work one of my predecessors was very fond of using the Dymo. It take a LOT of effort to remove these labels, some I know for a fact were put on 25 years ago. Mant that come off leave behind a sticky residue that has to be cleaned off. ....

The ones I mean fell off but left the residue, which was not particularly sticky. It probably depends on the surface. I have seen some stick tight, and others just pop off easily if they are caught on something. The somewhat thick label will catch on things .

For example labels on a set of old metal drawers I bought for tool storage. Many of the drawers had Dymo labels, and I needed to remove them. Something over half of the labels popped off easily when I went to remove them (some already had, just in moving them). A few were extremely hard to remove, and the rest were about "normal".

IanParkin
02-26-2017, 12:18 PM
I use lots of brother touch labels now but still use a Dymo embossed label printer for casting patterns

Paul Alciatore
02-26-2017, 03:14 PM
I have or did have one of those old Dymo labelers somewhere. I bought it decades ago and never even used up the initial supply of tape that I bought with it. I never really liked them. And they did fall off too soon.

Somewhere, decades ago, probably when I got my first computer and printer, I started printing my own labels on adhesive backed paper. I use both cut-to-size and full sheet labels. There are so many styles of label sheets available that you can get almost anything you want. Temporary or permanent adhesive, color, size, thickness, etc. It is all out there if you look. And you can either spray them with a clear coat or use a laminating sheet for better durability. This serves for a wide variety of uses from marking containers and bins to making front panels for instruments and devices that I build.

One tip if you go this way: get one or more of the corner rounding cutters that they sell at crafts stores. If you round the corners of a label before applying it, it will stay put longer. They always start peeling at the corners.

Magicniner
02-26-2017, 03:26 PM
You could always pick up an old Dymo Mite and stick your labels on with the adhesive of your choice, or rivets ;-)

darryl
02-26-2017, 03:32 PM
I did a project once where I made my own front panel by casting epoxy into a mold. For the labels I used the 3D dymo tape, but in a different way. I attached them to wooden strips which I then laid across the mold sides such that the lettering dipped into the epoxy just enough to make the indents. When it was cured I peeled the strips up, which left the lettering indent pattern in the epoxy. These I filled with paint, then I gave the back side a sanding. It actually looked pretty cool- lot of work though.