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View Full Version : Buyer's remorse????



Tim Clarke
03-03-2017, 09:56 PM
I didn't want to hijack Dan the chemist's post about his new shaper.
So, how many have had buyer's remorse after buying a machine, and how long did it last?
I know in my own case, the buyer's remorse I've had was about the machine/ tooling I DIDN'T buy!

TC

1-800miner
03-03-2017, 10:10 PM
Oh all the time! It lasts for a few minutes. I shake it off by perusing tool catalogs.

thaiguzzi
03-03-2017, 10:14 PM
Oh all the time! It lasts for a few minutes. I shake it off by perusing tool catalogs.

LOL !

flylo
03-03-2017, 10:26 PM
Never, always wish they had more. Now moving it all home remorse, that's different!

RichR
03-03-2017, 11:18 PM
No remorse, but I did pass up on a really good deal a few months ago. A Kurt D688 vise complete with 10 pairs of aluminum jaws, plexiglass
shield, handle, and speed handle showed up on craigslist for $60. I was very tempted until I looked up the specs. My current vise hangs about
6.5 inches off of the table. The Kurt is 2 inches longer. They list the shipping weight as 80 pounds. Between the larger footprint and the
weight I figured it might be a bit much for my round column mill.

38_Cal
03-03-2017, 11:53 PM
No remorse, but I did pass up on a really good deal a few months ago. A Kurt D688 vise complete with 10 pairs of aluminum jaws, plexiglass
shield, handle, and speed handle showed up on craigslist for $60. I was very tempted until I looked up the specs. My current vise hangs about
6.5 inches off of the table. The Kurt is 2 inches longer. They list the shipping weight as 80 pounds. Between the larger footprint and the
weight I figured it might be a bit much for my round column mill.

You would just have to buy a bigger mill!

Mcgyver
03-04-2017, 08:30 AM
Oh all the time! It lasts for a few minutes. I shake it off by perusing tool catalogs.

lol, great cure, get focused on the next buy! It is a strange brain chemistry thing.....I don't need anything more, but there's prospects out there that have got me excited like a little kid the day before Christmas.

Where I need to have a serious meeting with myself, is about not buying any more projects!

Blazemaster83
03-04-2017, 09:27 AM
I have had it many times. It usually goes away after I get it home, and start fixing it up. The remorse does stay if the machine ends up being in a lot worse shape than I thought, or if I find something the seller forgot to mention(like a broken casting).

1 machine come to mind.

Marvel 4b power hacksaw-great saw if it was in the condition the seller said it was. Took it all apart to clean and one of the main castings that has a sliding way was cracked in 2 and has a bad braze job. Something you couldn't spot unless it was in pieces and can probably only happen from dropping the saw.

carlquib
03-04-2017, 10:18 AM
My buyer's remorse is like Tim's. I go to a lot of auctions, so I normally figure out what my limit is before I go. I'll often think, after I'm home, I should have bid one more time on that lot. My last case of buyer's remorse was when I went to pick up a lathe I had agreed to buy. He had a bunch of other tooling as well. I picked up a nice 8" super spacer and some extra chucks for the lathe. He had a 24" troyke rotory table I should have made an offer on. Still wish to this day I had made him an offer for it.

Hello, my name is Brian and I'm a toolaholic

QSIMDO
03-04-2017, 11:39 AM
Months and years later.
When I realize things like "this POS Asian mill is sloppy in more axes than there are ways to fix it!".
Spend what it takes to get something that will perform longer than you will and you'll never have buyer's remorse.

Seastar
03-04-2017, 12:52 PM
Just once when I realized that the dial on the knee axis on the Chicom 6x26 mill I bought new had no relation to inches or cm. in fact it has no relation to anything normal.
The mill was out of warranty when I realized the problem.
I fixed that by installing a 4 axis DRO.
Thats what I get for buying Chicom tools.
Other thaen that it's OK.
Bill

Mr Fixit
03-04-2017, 01:22 PM
Hi Group,

I may not call it remorse but I bought a 15x40 gear head Asian lathe with a mill which is what I really wanted. In 5yrs I didn't even wire it up and use it, so I finally sold it to a good friend who's REALLY HAPPY!! I guess what I'm saying is I have remorse that l should have done this sooner since it wasn't in use and I made someone else so grateful.

TX
Mr fixit for the family
Chris. :)

Doc Nickel
03-04-2017, 02:02 PM
Like Q, my only regrets came years later. :)

Like Dan's post, I picked up a shaper when one came available, in large part thanks to the hosannas sung of such things on this board. At the time, I had the floor space, I thought the machines were cool, and I had a few minutes of free time that I figured could be put towards repairing it.

In the intervening ten years, however, my business has expanded considerably, and moved somewhat away from the onesey-twosey hand-made part into the short-run production batch. And IN that ten years, I have had exactly one job in which the shaper was ideally- or at least usefully- suited.

Thanks to HSM-pressured old-iron disease, I eventually wound up with two shapers (big and little) along with a 'camelback' drill, a valve grinder I've now had for ten years and used exactly once, an antique surface grinder I was partway through rebuilding before I acquired a much newer and far more ready-to-go one, and finally a large gearhead lathe that has so far been a three-plus-year rebuild project, has cost me nearly $5k in parts and tooling, and is now far larger than I need or have room for.

Now, I'm in desperate need of floor space for some small CNC machines I hope to be able to buy before too long, but I'm stuck with the old crap. I can't give the shapers away- except to the scrappers, who with today's prices will give me about 8-1/2 cents for them- and I haven't tried unloading the Camelback, but I can bet I'll be stuck with that, too, or at best only able to get a few bucks for it, and even then only to somebody who wants it for a decoration.

I, too, hate to see the old machines scrapped. The big shaper has thus far survived some 112 years, and I'd rather not be the one to finally junk it. Ditto the old drill. But at the moment they're basically useless, and taking up a nontrivial amount of ever more valuable room.

Doc.

flylo
03-04-2017, 02:15 PM
Valve grinders, I have 2 complete valve & seat grinder sets & now that I don't work on antique planes & the world has gone replace not repair I can't hardly give them away. But they've paid for themselves.

ikdor
03-04-2017, 03:21 PM
I have some regret about buying a lathe first and not a mill. But then again if I would have probably missed the lathe if I would have started with a mill.
I bought into the story that you can do everything on a lathe, but the story didn't mention that milling on a lathe is for people with more time than I have.

Dan Dubeau
03-04-2017, 05:18 PM
I'm not much an "impulsle buyer, so I don't get buyers remorse. I do get not buyers remorse though. Deals I've walked away from, that I should have taken but for various reasons talk myself out of them at the time. My being so tight and cheap with money, that happens much more frequently. ha ha. Live auctions are the worst for me, as I'll stew on the stuff I should have bid higher for weeks. Oh well, best you can do is live and learn.

When im doubtful on a purchase now, instead of asking myself if I really need it or not, I instead ask myself if I'll still be sour at myself for not buying it in the future.

Ries
03-04-2017, 06:45 PM
There is one tool I feel that way about- a Grizzly 7x12 horizontal bandsaw.
I bought it for a job where I needed to miter 6" square tube.
And from the first week, I never liked it.
It is always fussier, and harder to get good results from, than pretty much any other tool I own.
It has broken a couple of times, in ways it shouldnt- the vise kinda fell apart, and required an ad hoc repair involving tig welding and silicon bronze filler rod.
Then, it ate its own drive gear, and, Grizzly didnt remember ever selling the saw, a measly 12 years after I bought it, so I had to track down a Rong Fu replacement part source- cant remember now, it was either MSC or McMaster.
It just has bad juju.
normally, you can, with some swearing and wrench work, get it to do what you want, but its always annoying.
Oddly enough, I have 2 4x6 Jet bandsaws, that I love, that have worked with minimal problems for years and years- and I use em daily. But the Griz, I keep in the far shed, and only drag it out when no other tool in the shop will do the job.
Like those hundreds of cuts I had to make in 1/2" x 6" flat bar a couple of years ago.

I wish I had spent the money for an Ellis, or an Italian saw.
And I wish that every time I use the damn thing.

RB211
03-04-2017, 06:48 PM
My air conpressor, but again, I did go ultra cheap... Not out much should I trash it.

KiddZimaHater
03-04-2017, 07:12 PM
I have buyers remorse with my Grizzly Surface Grinder.
For the price I paid new, I could've bought a used "Real" surface grinder like a REID, HARIG, DoALL, etc...
I discovered this after-the-fact.
The Grizzly motor is weak, and I rarely use the thing.
But I keep convincing myself I need it. :)

softtail
03-04-2017, 08:01 PM
I usually get 'didn't buy it remorse'. If you get something you regret on Ebay, you can always sell it....on Ebay.

Mister ED
03-04-2017, 08:27 PM
Usually I don't have too much remorse for what I buy ... only for what I didn't buy. For me there are at least 4 old, very rare farm windmills that I am still kicking myself for not buying. I have not seen one of these brands come up for sale since.

Mister ED
03-04-2017, 08:28 PM
I usually get 'didn't buy it remorse'. If you get something you regret on Ebay, you can always sell it....on Ebay.
LOL, I always call Ebay a specialty tool rental store. Once in a while you can even make a buck on selling it.

softtail
03-04-2017, 09:17 PM
Usually I don't have too much remorse for what I buy ... only for what I didn't buy. For me there are at least 4 old, very rare farm windmills that I am still kicking myself for not buying. I have not seen one of these brands come up for sale since.


Come on out to MT with a flatbed.. windmill and old vehicle paradise.

Sun God
03-05-2017, 01:13 AM
I bought a Chicom RF-45 clone, and have hated it ever since. Firstly my fault - foolishly went with an MT3 spindle when I should have gone R8. Then the machines fault. It gets the job done, but literally everything about it is awful. Clearly the importer took out every cost-saving option they could with this particular machine. I've barely got 100 hours worth of work on it I would think, and I'd gladly let it go for half what I paid for it, if I could swap it out for a decent European machine or a good Bridgeport clone.

Second major machine buyers remorse was buying a Quorn. I was sold on needing a T&C grinder, and I guess the masochistic model-engineer cachet of the Quorn sold itself on me. By and large the machine is acceptably constructed, with the exception of the toolhead, which was poorly bored. Ignoring that minor deficiency, that I worked around by building my own toolhead, I just hate the machine. It's a mess. All those bloody ball handles get in the way of one another and foul each other, such that every setup on the machine requires first workout out which angle to set so a handle isn't fouling every subsequent setting. I'd gladly swap all the handles out for flanged nuts and use a wrench, which would be far more practical, but the maker decided to alternate between M6 and 1/4-20 UNC throughout the machine - I suspect it was built in two distinct stages. Beyond that, it just isn't easy to use. For the handful of tasks I need from a T&C grinder, it seems the Harold Hall jigs would be far faster to set up and use, and overall more practical. In the end I built an interpretation of Harold's grinding rest and use it regularly, while the Quorn gathers dust.

Third major case of buyers remorse was the CNC Fusion conversion kit for my SX2LF mill. It wasn't shipped for over three months after purchase. Required major modification of both the machine and the kit in order to fit - would not have been able to fit it if I didn't own another mill. It's poorly designed such that fitting the Z-axis ballscrew prohibits adjustment of the Z-axis gibs. Backlash in the ballnuts was far above what was advertised. I upgraded to helical couplers and they shipped me one of the wrong size. Overall, very disappointing for what is advertised as a mostly 'drop-in' kit. And to cap it all off, actual performance in use is quite disappointing, to the point I wish I'd gone with Evanuts and the original leadscrews instead. Would have ended up with similar or better performance for far less cost and hassle.

garyhlucas
03-05-2017, 11:00 AM
We bought a used MSC Rong Fu 7x12 horizontal bandsaw that we put a lot of work in improving and it is still poor and always too small. We fixed that problem.

Just got a Marvel series 8 Mark I tilting head bandsaw that cuts 18" by 18". Sounds big, but we have 16" HDPE pipe to cut. Found it on Ebay, 39 years old but after stripping it down every important component looks new! Why a Marvel? Because every part is still available!

blckbx
03-07-2017, 05:14 AM
Sellers remorse

http://i1036.photobucket.com/albums/a441/blckbx/DSC01555_zpszgdmzjr2.jpg (http://s1036.photobucket.com/user/blckbx/media/DSC01555_zpszgdmzjr2.jpg.html)

Sold to buy double glazing. I'de rather be cold :(

HWooldridge
03-07-2017, 09:03 AM
Agreed - I only have remorse for the ones I sell. A guy gave me two Niagara slip rolls some years ago after I helped him set up another machine. Both were old, heavy duty, 50" models but I wound up selling them for not much (think I got $400 for both). Another friend gave me a large Baldor polishing lathe - that also got sold in a moment of weakness.