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jhe.1973
03-05-2017, 02:29 AM
Hi Everyone,

Over the years I have been scrounging items for a welding turntable. I finally started construction last October and finished it enough for its first use about 2 weeks ago. Here it is in an import engine stand that I modified years ago to make it adjustable for height:

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=933&d=1488696416

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=934&d=1488696451

First job:

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=935&d=1488696470

Decades ago, my dad gave me this 41 pound chunk of cast aluminum that he was going use for the body of a dividing head he hoped to build:

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=936&d=1488696487

It was about 11 inch O.D. X 5 inches thick and quite rough.

This thread is going to show a bunch setups and hoops I had to jump through to arrive at the finished tool so more is on the way...................................

jhe.1973
03-05-2017, 02:43 AM
Because the top and bottom were not flat this was the first step to get something to hold securely:

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=937&d=1488696502

This next view shows the end of the threaded drawbar I used to be sure it couldn't fly out of the chuck:

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=938&d=1488696519

Once I got a smooth, round diameter and flat face I could turn it around like so:

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=939&d=1488696551

This view also showed the clamping plate I made for things just like this. Its much more rigid than a toolpost.

Because I got a great deal on a pair of large taper roller bearings I needed to have both bores be in alignment. Soooooo, I turned the O.D. like a spool so I could have a face to line up when I flipped it around to finish bore the opposite side:

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=940&d=1488696566

Next I set it up in the mill to cut two notches in case I ever need to remove the races...................................next post......................

jhe.1973
03-05-2017, 02:55 AM
http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=941&d=1488696585

30 pounds of chips and two days later:

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=942&d=1488696601

At one place I had worked we had a turntable that was shop made with just a chuck mounted on a shaft - no through hole. I decided that if I ever made one for myself it would have a hollow spindle. These roller bearings have a 3-1/2 inch bore so my spindle has a 3 inch bore:

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=943&d=1488696620

That outta do it!

Next I made the adjusting nut from some 1.25 plate I had on hand. The hole that was already there proved to make boring it go slower!

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=944&d=1488696637

To save time, I roughed the corners off in the mill before turning the O.D. ..................... next post.............

jhe.1973
03-05-2017, 03:07 AM
Before taking it out of the lathe, I faced one side to leave a rough circle to act as a pattern to follow for the end mill:

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=949&d=1488696992

Cranking both leadscrews by hand I took the full corner off in one cut ----- slowly:

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=950&d=1488696996

Then it was back to the lathe for finishing. Years ago I used to run a job and I made these soft jaws. They come in handy for things like this when I want to have the entire thread finished to size and not have to worry about hitting the chuck or its jaws:

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=953&d=1488697269

Flipping the jaws allowed me to hold the spindle securely w/o the need for a steady rest:

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=954&d=1488697274

Then I could finish the end to accept a flange for the chuck. This time I bought a 1 inch thick CRS round from Interstate Metals when I was in town. The time saved was worth it!!!

jhe.1973
03-05-2017, 03:24 AM
http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=959&d=1488697457

I welded it on from both sides just to be safe:

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=960&d=1488697460

I started this project undecided if I would drive the spindle with chain, belt or gears. I rummaged around and decided to use these gears once I calculated the speed I would end up with. This was the first mock-up:

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=961&d=1488697462

I only(?) had to cut the big gear. The smaller two came from a Harley engine. The larger of the two drove the generator and the smaller one is one of the cams. These are case hardened for very long life - I've never seen one wear through the hard surface. I used one of the gears as a template and ground a tool bit by hand for a flycutter. This view is the second setup I tried. Because of the intermittent cut the first setup wasn't rigid enough:

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=963&d=1488697519

I have two indicators set so I could monitor the bore and face to show if anything was moving. Then I messed up the spacing and had to turn the teeth off. They weren't too deep, so IIRC I went from 130 teeth to 120.

jhe.1973
03-05-2017, 03:42 AM
Even this last setup proved to not be able to hold the blank solidly. I ended up drilling four 1/2 inch holes in the blank, made an aluminum adapter to but up against the Hardinge dog driver and hold it all with a stout drawbar:

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=964&d=1488697538

This finally worked well and I could finish the teeth. You also saw my highly refined 'coolant' system? I had made that years ago for a lathe job I ran and it worked well there also. Oh yeah, also notice the white out on the correct holes in the index. One screw up was enough!

Here I was turning the cam lobe off after softening it:

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=966&d=1488697569

This is my method for keeping the gear teeth hard while heating the hub:

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=967&d=1488697607

Not much water is needed. I think this can is from olives and the gear hub is heated to not quite red hot right in the water. Once this gear was finished I could mock-up the components more solidly using my fab table:

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=968&d=1488697621

This allowed me to get some dimensions for making the motor & gearbox mount........................next post.................

Paul Alciatore
03-05-2017, 03:53 AM
I love it when a plan comes together.

jhe.1973
03-05-2017, 03:56 AM
That last mock-up was when I realized that I could make this assembly more compact by flipping the worm gear over. Making the motor/gear drive mounting plate gave me a better view of how I could mount the motor assembly to spindle housing:

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=969&d=1488697634

I saw that if I cut this flat, I could fairly easily adapt the spindle housing to the drive assembly:

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=970&d=1488697648

This enabled me to set up a solid means of getting some accurate dimensions to make a CAD drawing:

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=971&d=1488697695

By accurately laying out the angles needed and carefully cutting to the scribe lines I could position the mounting flanges to this piece for welding. I also have two adjustable parallels inside to support the sides so they are more solid while milling:

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=972&d=1488697718

..........................................

jhe.1973
03-05-2017, 04:09 AM
Hi Paul! Glad to 'see' you again. I can't get here too often so I am trying to make the best of it right now.

Here are the two components fixed together:

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=973&d=1488697739

To make the bracket to hold the idler gear, I first lined up the rotary table with the milling spindle and then scribed two lines at the correct distance in the aluminum sub-plate fastened to the surface. Then, all I had to do was make sure that the odd shaped chunk I grabbed from my scrap pile covered those lines:

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=974&d=1488697757

First trial fit:

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=975&d=1488697798

This bracket is slotted in case I wish to try a smaller gear on the worm drive. The meshing is set just like change gearing on a lathe.

Next came an outboard support for the idler and some cosmetic cleaning up:

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=976&d=1488697817

Notice also the use of a different sub-plate for mounting the housing in the rotab..................

jhe.1973
03-05-2017, 04:20 AM
This is a brush for transferring the welding current directly to the spindle inside the housing between - not through - the bearings:

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=977&d=1488697835

The slot on the right has a spring to keep contact with the spindle. I figured that a brass end would be less likely to score then if I had just used the aluminum. Here is how it looks before the housing is bolted up:

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=978&d=1488697856

While I was going through all this work I bored and fitted a faceplate I got at a yard sale years ago. This will let me utilize the gigantic through hole if I ever need to:

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=979&d=1488697871

Just realized that I didn't show the DC motor controller and foot switch:

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=980&d=1488706112

Whew! Its 2:30 AM.................WAY past my bedtime.................but its good to be back here for awhile!!

boslab
03-05-2017, 06:24 AM
Jim
A powerfully well built beast, like the through hole myself, soon your robot army will have functional hips so world domination is at least one step closer, (the ball weld to stup thingy, your secrets out now)
I was a dick head, all the giant ball bearings I coulda Shulda retrieved out the bins in work ( thing rolling mill for size,) now I wanted 2 X 2" diameter recently to discover I nowhaveto buy them, $60 ea is the cheapest so far, mad, oh for a tidy scrap yard.
A swivel is handy for back argon ( or cheaper co2, argon is expensive) as are roller stands.
We had some pipes to tig in work, one of the welders decided the brand new pipe threader as a positioner, ruins were dumped in a in bin andbuiried under chips so I wouldent find it, they worked hard at it too, my office had a window into the shop and out to the yard, I preferred the view outside so usually spent staring into space time looking out, where the whole ghastly burial was witnessed.
I asked where the threader was next week to have a blank look, what threader?, the new one I said
Dunno, didn't know we had one was the reply.
I had recovered it and sent it to get it repaired, new bearings and a motor, it came back with a sign engraved in Formica fixed on "dai, this is a pipe threader, not a pipe rotater, it is not designed to conduct 200 Amps, nor does it like to be buried alive, unless your threading tube, hands off"
He was impressed
Btw, I once saw a rotator/positioner that had been built using the table stand off an industrial sewing machine, what was interesting was rotation was knee paddle controlled, which was infinitely variable allowing both pedal and rotate speed control while sitting, there was some Morgan chrome blanket to protect the operator as well, handy tig welding pipe fittings on thin tubes.
Well done, nice photos, if creating a machine = aqquireing a machine then you have earned many you sucks, I guess about 1 Decisuck, (10 you suck, exchange rates may vary, Eurosucks are worthless, Trumpsucks are going up and 1 clintonsuck gets you impeached)
Mark

fixerup
03-05-2017, 07:37 AM
Thank you for posting your project. I have learned new machining work holding techniques and how to layout and plan the assembly of many components. Great build and it should last many lifetime.
Cheers!
Phil

Dan Dubeau
03-05-2017, 08:01 AM
.......but its good to be back here for awhile!!

Glad to have you "back". Thanks for sharing. Nicely done and documented.

ww_big_al
03-05-2017, 08:18 AM
I'm impressed. It show quality craftsmanship.

vpt
03-05-2017, 12:14 PM
What a build! Nice job!

The one thing I would be just a tiny bit concerned about is the brush set up. From the looks the brush makes metal contact with the housing/base of the unit and then I assume the end contacts the spindle? If the end doesn't transmit the ground 100% for some reason the current may try to still pass threw the housing/bearings to the ground. Some of the best grounding methods I have seen isolate the ground strap/brush from the housing of the unit so no stray voltage can pass threw the bearings.

lakeside53
03-05-2017, 12:31 PM
Yes, excellent work!

Brush... maybe have it (or another) on the outside of the chuck body also? I'd hate to see one little piece of dirt ruin your stunning work!

Highpower
03-05-2017, 12:38 PM
http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=959&d=1488697457



Apparently you don't actually NEED a welding turn table from the look of these welds...

lakeside53
03-05-2017, 12:41 PM
They are amazing...

d kirby
03-05-2017, 12:44 PM
Jim, I imagine all of us here, wish you would stop by more often,with your projects and ideas.
Your craftsmanship is outstanding and very much appreciated.

While you are here, maybe you could throw together another weld positioner that I could copy, to be able to tig weld the round tubes on motorcycle frames that are in a fixture.

There are probably two people that really like your new welding turntable, and that would be me, and your wife, because now she gets to have her blender back. HA HA!!!

Dave

Willy
03-05-2017, 02:13 PM
Jim thank you so much for taking the time to document the project, I know it can be a pain sometimes to do so but it is greatly appreciated!

Great looking project, very professional level of skill demonstrated...again.:)

becksmachine
03-05-2017, 07:21 PM
Yes, complete agreement with the others, beautiful work. You are a very talented, persistent craftsman!

One tip, disregard if you already know.

In post #2, you could almost as easily reached through the bore with your indicator to indicate directly on the previously finished shoulder. Cutting an external shoulder to indicate on does require less neck bending to watch the indicator though. One of the perks/joys of being both engineer and fabricator. :)

Dave

jhe.1973
03-06-2017, 01:29 AM
Thanks to all of you for your compliments and encouragements !


..................................................

In post #2, you could almost as easily reached through the bore with your indicator to indicate directly on the previously finished shoulder. Cutting an external shoulder to indicate on does require less neck bending to watch the indicator though. One of the perks/joys of being both engineer and fabricator. :)

Dave

Dave,

You are right and thanks for pointing that out. I don't remember if I even thought of indicating the inside. Possibly 'cuz this slug was a very poor quality casting as shown below. I was going to cut the center out and save it thinking it would be a nice chunk of aluminum. Then it dulled my bandsaw blade with so much foundry sand inside:

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=992&d=1488778965


............................

While you are here, maybe you could throw together another weld positioner that I could copy, to be able to tig weld the round tubes on motorcycle frames that are in a fixture.

There are probably two people that really like your new welding turntable, and that would be me, and your wife, because now she gets to have her blender back. HA HA!!!

Dave

Yeah right! almost 4 months of 'throwing together' this one - I don't think I will take you up on that suggestion. :D However, I am honored that you remember my YouTube video showing my first 'turntable'.


Apparently you don't actually NEED a welding turn table from the look of these welds...

Thanks, but let me start at the beginning.

I am working with a friend in our clock & watch organization who wants to build an electrically impulsed double pendulum clock with the pendulums running in a vacuum chamber. I volunteered 'cuz I want to do some vacuum chamber experiments myself & I have some experience w/UHV (ultra high vacuum) chambers.

UHV stuff is quite expensive so when I found some stainless corrugated tubing at Lowe's & Home Depot, simple modification I thought. Here is what I ended up with on my first try to fuse weld the tube to a flange I made:

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=993&d=1488780160

The one on the right was my first attempt, the left one came later. This bore is only about 3/4 inch and my problem was the torch was in the way of my sight once I had tried to come around to the near side of the weld. I couldn't tell that the arc was wandering. It may work, but it looks like crap so I will cut it apart & re-do it. The second one on the left was done with several starts and stops to re-position the part 3 or 4 times. It looks nicer, but each start & stop risks having microscopic voids. With each start, I was very careful to get a good puddle before advancing so I doubt that the flange on the left has any voids, but I will feel much better w/a turntable to make it all the way around with only one weld.

Andy and Lakeside,

Thanks so much for voicing your concerns. Feedback like this is one of the things I miss about working in a shop w/skilled friends. I haven't been completely comfortable with the brush setup and your comments were just what I needed to take another look as to insulating the brush. I realized that I can make flanged nylon ('cuz I have some) spacers around the 5/16 through bolts and the brush will be completely insulated. Simple insurance.

Thanks again!

Fasttrack
03-06-2017, 10:29 AM
Welding UHV components is how I learned TIG. A 3/4" bore is really tough. I usually do it in two halves but, like you say, every start/stop is anther chance for a problem. I'll add a welding turntable to my long list of projects... :) Thanks for the inspiration!

vpt
03-06-2017, 10:36 AM
To help with stop/starts welding in a situation like this, I found it helps to: Get to the point you want to stop and reposition. Weld an extra 1/2" past your "stop point" without filler then stop. When you restart start just shy of where you stopped feeding filler in (1/4" before the end of the weld in this case) and start the puddle there. Back up to the edge where you stopped feeding filler and then start welding normally again feeding filler and moving along till you need to stop again.

boslab
03-06-2017, 11:52 AM
We had vacuum flexes on the spectrometers in work like that, corrugated stainless things, I found that plumbing supplies do flex gas meter tails with a threaded end, I'd thread stub fused to flex, I found I could make a vacuum flange for the coupling bands and o ring thing and screw it onto the threaded end, I tig welded round the outside then, worked ok, tried one with just sealant, it worked amazingly though would fail a helium leak test for sure I'd guess, but it was good enough for what I wanted.
Mark

fixerdave
03-06-2017, 11:29 PM
I have, apparently, come to the conclusion that I must have a turntable for welding... if you can call what I MIG-blob together welding. Hey, what I lack in quality I make up for with quantity ;)

The OP's work is amazing, as is the engineering. But, I've got to ask... is all that necessary? Do you really need tapered roller bearings to support something that will have an RPM in the single digit range? Even with my crappy welding, it's not likely to go round more than 2 or three times, even with lots of grinding. When I first contemplated this, it was like... take a lazy-susan, tack-weld it to a plate that can hold an old junk 4-jaw wood chuck and then connect it to a $3 gear reduced motor run off an Arduino for speed control, maybe a big old o-ring for a drive belt, or get all fancy and use a toothed belt... didn't even think about the ground strap. Now, I'm feeling totally inadequate. Totally.

Has anyone built a slightly lower quality turntable for welding and managed to get away with using it? I'm not looking to make a work of art, and you'd understand why if you ever saw one of my welds.

David...

jhe.1973
03-06-2017, 11:42 PM
Jim
A powerfully well built beast, like the through hole myself, soon your robot army will have functional hips so world domination is at least one step closer, (the ball weld to stup thingy, your secrets out now)...........................................

Mark

OH NO! my secret is indeed out. (note to self - change tactics) ;)


.....................................
We had some pipes to tig in work, one of the welders decided the brand new pipe threader as a positioner, ruins were dumped in a in bin andbuiried under chips so I wouldent find it, they worked hard at it too, my office had a window into the shop and out to the yard, I preferred the view outside so usually spent staring into space time looking out, where the whole ghastly burial was witnessed.
I asked where the threader was next week to have a blank look, what threader?, the new one I said
Dunno, didn't know we had one was the reply.
I had recovered it and sent it to get it repaired, new bearings and a motor, it came back with a sign engraved in Formica fixed on "dai, this is a pipe threader, not a pipe rotater, it is not designed to conduct 200 Amps, nor does it like to be buried alive, unless your threading tube, hands off"
He was impressed .............................

Mark

I'm impressed too!


...................................
Btw, I once saw a rotator/positioner that had been built using the table stand off an industrial sewing machine, what was interesting was rotation was knee paddle controlled, which was infinitely variable allowing both pedal and rotate speed control while sitting, there was some Morgan chrome blanket to protect the operator as well, handy tig welding pipe fittings on thin tubes.
Well done, nice photos, if creating a machine = aqquireing a machine then you have earned many you sucks, I guess about 1 Decisuck, (10 you suck, exchange rates may vary, Eurosucks are worthless, Trumpsucks are going up and 1 clintonsuck gets you impeached)
Mark

Mark,

Sorry that I missed thanking you yesterday for your post. Your mention of the sewing machine use reminded me of one forum member at a clock & watch site. He uses one as a die filer. Thought it pretty cool.

Thanks also for the sucks especially the last 3 examples - the Clinton one is priceless!

jhe.1973
03-06-2017, 11:55 PM
I have, apparently, come to the conclusion that I must have a turntable for welding... if you can call what I MIG-blob together welding. Hey, what I lack in quality I make up for with quantity ;)

The OP's work is amazing, as is the engineering. But, I've got to ask... is all that necessary? Do you really need tapered roller bearings to support something that will have an RPM in the single digit range? Even with my crappy welding, it's not likely to go round more than 2 or three times, even with lots of grinding. When I first contemplated this, it was like... take a lazy-susan, tack-weld it to a plate that can hold an old junk 4-jaw wood chuck and then connect it to a $3 gear reduced motor run off an Arduino for speed control, maybe a big old o-ring for a drive belt, or get all fancy and use a toothed belt... didn't even think about the ground strap. Now, I'm feeling totally inadequate. Totally.

Has anyone built a slightly lower quality turntable for welding and managed to get away with using it? I'm not looking to make a work of art, and you'd understand why if you ever saw one of my welds.

David...

Hi David,

The roller bearings are definitely way overkill. They are used on 18 wheeler axles so I think I am safe as far as load. :D However, they take care of radial & end play so I didn't have to mess around w/thrust washers etc. I went on an auction site to see if I could find any large bearings and these turned up for a buy it now or best offer. I offered $50.00 for both complete sets and they accepted. Figured at that price time saved was worth it.

There are a number of HSM examples of turntables on the forum - if you do a search you should find them.

In case you haven't seen it, here is a link to a YouTube of my first slightly lower quality turntable:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s3uAwB6XIH8

wombat2go
03-07-2017, 09:27 AM
jhe,
Thanks
Now I think i could use a small vertical version for silver-soldering small shaft peices together.

Fasttrack
03-07-2017, 10:17 AM
To help with stop/starts welding in a situation like this, I found it helps to: Get to the point you want to stop and reposition. Weld an extra 1/2" past your "stop point" without filler then stop. When you restart start just shy of where you stopped feeding filler in (1/4" before the end of the weld in this case) and start the puddle there. Back up to the edge where you stopped feeding filler and then start welding normally again feeding filler and moving along till you need to stop again.

UHV vacuum welds are "all killer no filler" - they are fusion only welds. If strength is a concern, then a structural weld is made on the outside and then the inside is fused to create the seal.

jhe.1973
03-09-2017, 12:51 AM
To help with stop/starts welding in a situation like this, I found it helps to: Get to the point you want to stop and reposition. Weld an extra 1/2" past your "stop point" without filler then stop. When you restart start just shy of where you stopped feeding filler in (1/4" before the end of the weld in this case) and start the puddle there. Back up to the edge where you stopped feeding filler and then start welding normally again feeding filler and moving along till you need to stop again.

Andy,

Thanks for a great suggestion. I'll keep that in mind for the next time a need arises.


UHV vacuum welds are "all killer no filler" - they are fusion only welds. If strength is a concern, then a structural weld is made on the outside and then the inside is fused to create the seal.

Fasttrack,

I like the "all killer no filler", hadn't heard that one before.

For those of you who may not be aware, UHV welding is some of the most demanding welding there is. Often times you don't have a second chance to make it right.

When designing/building UHV chambers & piping, the weld is placed towards the vacuum side if at all possible. No matter how tiny the seam or how tightly two items may be pressed together, atoms are trapped between the surfaces and they will eventually break loose and contaminate the UHV environment.

Occasionally there is no way to gain access to the vacuum side for fuse welding. Then the weld must have 100% penetration from the outside. The example below is my first trial to prove to my supervisor that I could accomplish this. Only then I was turned loose on the real (meaning expensive) thing. The inside weld was done from the outside:

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=995&d=1489038573

Black Forest
03-09-2017, 08:44 AM
Andy,

Thanks for a great suggestion. I'll keep that in mind for the next time a need arises.



Fasttrack,

I like the "all killer no filler", hadn't heard that one before.

For those of you who may not be aware, UHV welding is some of the most demanding welding there is. Often times you don't have a second chance to make it right.

When designing/building UHV chambers & piping, the weld is placed towards the vacuum side if at all possible. No matter how tiny the seam or how tightly two items may be pressed together, atoms are trapped between the surfaces and they will eventually break loose and contaminate the UHV environment.

Occasionally there is no way to gain access to the vacuum side for fuse welding. Then the weld must have 100% penetration from the outside. The example below is my first trial to prove to my supervisor that I could accomplish this. Only then I was turned loose on the real (meaning expensive) thing. The inside weld was done from the outside:

http://bbs.homeshopmachinist.net/attachment.php?attachmentid=995&d=1489038573

Do you have to worry about turbulence with these vacuum chambers? I would think not but I have no experience with any of that type of welding.

jhe.1973
03-09-2017, 12:53 PM
Do you have to worry about turbulence with these vacuum chambers? I would think not but I have no experience with any of that type of welding.

Hi Black Forest,

You are right that turbulence is not a problem. This photo that I posted was just of two items from the scrap bin and represent the piping used to hook up a vacuum system. The various chambers are of different configurations for the different purposes researchers might have.

To do welds with total penetration, the inside is filled with argon which allows the formation of the inside weld bead. You have to feed a lot of filler rod and keep moving because you are intentionally burning through during the entire weld.

Not for the faint of heart!

;)