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Joe Pie
03-06-2017, 08:32 AM
Hi Guys. My name is Joe Pie. I am new to this forum, but also host a YouTube channel broadcast from my business in Austin Texas. I've been in prototype machining since 1976 and have posted some videos of industrial insider setup and operational shortcuts you probably won't find in the books. I am very responsive to questions my subscribers ask and invite you all to visit and possibly subscribe if any of my material helps you out. Heres the link https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCpp6lgdc_XO_FZYJppaFa5w/videos Take a look, ask a question and hit the subscribe button on your way out. Take care. JP

Davidhcnc
03-06-2017, 08:45 AM
OK You win:)

https://youtu.be/WCei5GlEZ5g

boslab
03-06-2017, 09:26 AM
Thanks joe, I bumped into it and was thoroughly impressed, particularly "spider rescue",
Mark
Also welcome, I didn't look at the number of posts, I thought you'd been here a while, there I go "assuming" now means getting it wrong as per usual

loose nut
03-06-2017, 09:53 AM
I have been watching your vid's, lots of good stuff there, even for the old timers.

Willy
03-06-2017, 09:58 AM
Already a subscriber Joe.
Some very good fast paced no nonsense info there...highly recommended.
I like the way Joe cuts to the chase and brings forth some very informative shop processes and tips.
Keep up the good work!

loose nut
03-06-2017, 10:07 AM
Question:

What does having someone subscribe do for you or anyone else on Youtube?

Do the fund you based on the number of viewers or something like that?

j king
03-06-2017, 10:08 AM
I have watched many of Joes vids and I agree that they are some very good lessons.nice job Joe.

QSIMDO
03-06-2017, 10:18 AM
Subscriber here as well, really appreciate the threading information.

pinstripe
03-06-2017, 10:19 AM
Do the fund you based on the number of viewers or something like that?

Yes, the more views they get, the more they get paid. The ratio/number of subscribers probably also factors into which videos are promoted, further feeding the cycle.

Joe_B
03-06-2017, 11:08 AM
Hi Joe, I have been watching your channel since the start. Love your vids, you have taught me a lot!

fastfire
03-06-2017, 11:13 AM
Been watching for quite a while. Lots of better ways to get things done!

rowbare
03-06-2017, 11:16 AM
Hi Joe,

I have been enjoying your videos since I came across them last month. I like that they are informative and to the point.

Keep up the good work!

bob

ncjeeper
03-06-2017, 01:08 PM
Hi Joe, I have been watching your channel since the start. Love your vids, you have taught me a lot!
X2.

Highpower
03-06-2017, 01:17 PM
+1 Been watching for awhile. Plain and simple enough so that even I can understand it. :o

fixerup
03-06-2017, 03:50 PM
Hi Joe,
I really like your videos. I followed the instruction on your video, threading from a shoulder and I did a prefect thread first go, thanks to you!
I will never thread toward a shoulder again, it always made me nervous to crash my tool bit. Now with your technique, I can thread from a shoulder and relax.
Cheers!
Phil

1935Ron
03-06-2017, 04:58 PM
Joe, been a watching for some time now ,great videos keep them coming!

BCRider
03-06-2017, 06:09 PM
Let's not forget that Joe is looking for ideas on what to cover. So along with thanking him for the videos he has done it's time to drag out your sticky issues you've run into in the past.

I like his videos as well. But just as importantly is how the videos make us think and teach us how to analyze setups and calculations so we can solve our own sticky problems.

I know that one of the better videos he did had no machines or machining in it at all. It was the one about figuring out how to measure a "V" groove or a counter sunk hole to allow a round rod or ball bearing to sit at a specific protrusion height. His use of logic and right angle triangles and just simply working with known dimensions and how they interacted was a treat to watch and a great way to approach a problem that at first glance appeared unsolvable.

johnnyd
03-06-2017, 09:04 PM
Got any tips or shortcuts on "picking up a thread"?

RichR
03-06-2017, 11:22 PM
Got any tips or shortcuts on "picking up a thread"?

The one time I needed to do that I waited for the threading dial to come to 1. Then I engaged the carriage. When the cutting bit reached the threaded
section I turned off the lathe. While wearing a set of magnifiers I adjusted the cross slide and compound until the cutter just filled the valley of
the thread. Be mindful of backlash when making those adjustments. Finally I zeroed the cross slide. Back out the cross slide, disengage the
carriage and crank it back to the right and resume threading.

Dan_the_Chemist
03-06-2017, 11:45 PM
I know that one of the better videos he did had no machines or machining in it at all. It was the one about figuring out how to measure a "V" groove or a counter sunk hole to allow a round rod or ball bearing to sit at a specific protrusion height. His use of logic and right angle triangles and just simply working with known dimensions and how they interacted was a treat to watch and a great way to approach a problem that at first glance appeared unsolvable.

I completely agree. There are dozens of YouTubers who will show you good ways (or bad ways) to turn, mill, or weld stuff, but darn few tackle the math and make it fun. Okay, well, I found it fun. I'm weird that way.

Here is one... How do I find the center of a tapped hole? The mouth of the hole is not round - it's a weird snail shape. Is a ball bearing going to sit in the exact middle of that hole?

cmantunes
03-07-2017, 12:51 AM
I already watch you, Joe! :)

Bgmnn1
03-07-2017, 12:58 AM
I completely agree. There are dozens of YouTubers who will show you good ways (or bad ways) to turn, mill, or weld stuff, but darn few tackle the math and make it fun. Okay, well, I found it fun. I'm weird that way.

Here is one... How do I find the center of a tapped hole? The mouth of the hole is not round - it's a weird snail shape. Is a ball bearing going to sit in the exact middle of that hole?

Screw in a shoulder bolt and dial in the shoulder.

Use a pin gauge that fits the minor diameter.

Dial in close to the surface of the part for best results.

dave_r
03-07-2017, 02:32 AM
I already watch you, Joe! :)

I think he prefers you watch his video's, not through his windows... :p

Euph0ny
03-07-2017, 09:18 AM
Screw in a shoulder bolt and dial in the shoulder.

Use a pin gauge that fits the minor diameter.

Dial in close to the surface of the part for best results.

Screw in a matching tap and use a dead centre or a coaxial indicator to pick up the centre in the end of the tap.

Euph0ny
03-07-2017, 09:20 AM
I should add: thanks for the videos, Joe. I have enjoyed watching and learning, and subscribed some time ago. If I might offer a small suggestion, please avoid filming in hand-held mode...

MichaelP
03-07-2017, 01:12 PM
Hi Joe,

Another subscriber here. Keep up the excellent work you do.

I noticed that a lot of people have questions on surface grinding: making parts square, general instructions, work holding, use of accessories, use of grinders for various types of job (circular, angular, tool sharpening, etc.), general instructions. I'm sure a good series on surface grinding will make a lot of people really happy, especially considering a lack of good literature.

Thank you.

Dan_the_Chemist
03-07-2017, 02:31 PM
Screw in a shoulder bolt and dial in the shoulder.

Use a pin gauge that fits the minor diameter.

Dial in close to the surface of the part for best results.


Screw in a matching tap and use a dead centre or a coaxial indicator to pick up the centre in the end of the tap.

I worry about thread tolerances when using a bolt, screw, or tap. When the bolt/tap first goes into the hole there will be a little wobble - not much, but +/- a couple of thou. If I tighten it down so the shoulder hits the surface it will stop wobbling, but will it be concentric? I wonder if it might shift to one side a little... I can't say I've checked this very carefully, but I know that when I've done something like this to pick up hole locations from an existing part, drilled matching holes in a new part, and then bolted the parts together I sometimes see a little more positional error in the hole locations than I like... more than my usual clumsy mistakes. I suspect I'm not getting true dead center of the hole this way.

Pin gauge to the minor diameter... BRILLIANT. :) One small problem - I don't have a set of pin gauges... :( However, it is a good solution for people with well equipped shops. Lessee... how much does my favorite Chinese import place want for a set ???

BCRider
03-07-2017, 05:04 PM
Dan, what method you use depends on which feature you want to be accurately centered on. If you want the center of the original hole then a drill bit or pin that lightly press fits into the hole is the way to go. If you want to be centered on the axis of the thread itself then I'd suggest that indicating of a snug fitting tap threaded into the holes is the way to go. As you correctly point out the tap can wander a little as the initial cut is made and the resulting thread axis can be displaced from the center axis of the tapping hole. A tap or machine cut "bolt" that was single point cut and has a machined true stub off it will center itself to the thread axis.

Generally given the requirement for some play in most threaded fasteners I'd say that there's usually a somewhat relaxed requirement so that either method will work. But since we are looking at "what if"s I'd say it matters which feature you need to be most accurately centered onto.

For this sort of feature and measurement you don't need a set of pin gauges. You can use drill shanks or other methods to measure the inside diameter and turn your own pin down to suit. You'd want it to be a fairly firm hand type push fit or GENTLE hammer fit so it brushes aside the burrs commonly turned up by the threading operation.

boslab
03-07-2017, 05:31 PM
I may be wrong, I usually am, but I don't think that Joe is really going to join us somehow, I think his goal was drumming up support, that being said, I enjoy his videos, I don't. Yet subscribe I don't think, can't even remember who I'm subscribed to anymore!, everybody I suspect.
It's a shame reall, not my subscribing, the fact that joe probably won't add to our little discourse, but there again, neither does lots of others with channels on the YouTube, Adam, don, etc, I don't think they are interested in us lot really, thier loss I suppose.
I hope I'm wrong and they do start engaging other than thier own channels, they only seem to engage with others of a similar vein, perhaps to further thier subscription numbers.
I responded almost straight away as if the post was some kind of discourse, after 3 pages I guess not.
I'm aspergic so whatever I'm thinking ends up out I'm afraid, sorry.
Mark

BCRider
03-07-2017, 07:32 PM
He may prove to be not as frequent a poster as us retired sort are. But his second post was on another thread asking about more detail related to a mystery item. So it seems he may drop in and actually "converse" from time to time.

lugnut
03-07-2017, 09:55 PM
As a old self taught home chip producer, I have spent a couple days sorting through some of Joe Pie's You Tube videos and plan to spend more time on them. Thank you Joe. you have a great knack explaining things to us old want a be's. Keep it up please.

Joe Pie
03-08-2017, 07:59 AM
Hey Mark. I gotta say, you're wrong. I am very interested in not only announcing my channel to help you guys out, but I'd be happy to answer all your questions. I got 4 pages of replies in just 2 days, I'll try to check in regularly when I can. The answers given to the inquiries posted, have been good. No need to say the same thing. If I see someone all alone or getting bad advice, I'll offer my suggestion. As my channel and my inbox would reflect, I am a very active member of the online community with 40+ years of manufacturing experience to back it up. Take care.

Joe Pie
03-08-2017, 08:01 AM
I am checking in. Like I responded to mark, I like the dialog and really don't feel the need to say the same thing.

Joe Pie
03-08-2017, 08:08 AM
Pinstripe posted a reply to Loose nut. Let me clear it up. First, I enjoy helping people with my many years of experience. Things I take for granted as common knowledge and share have really helped a lot of new machinists. YouTube does pay, but only based on how long their advertisement runs, whether or not the viewer hits on the advertisement, how many times it runs, if it runs all the way through, and even if an online sale is recorded. Total views do play a part, but only a fraction. A good video with a bunch of hits may pay about 30 cents a day on a site with tens of thousands of subscribers. Trust me when I say...I don't do it for the money.

boslab
03-08-2017, 08:12 AM
Thank you joe, I stand corrected, I have the great misfortune of saying(writing) what I think, a bad trait I know, I'm just glad you plan to join in, I do realise you have a bucket load of work, but some involvement is brilliant.
Thanks for replying as my initial thought was post and leave, as I'm wrong proven by you actually replying I'm really happy, i don't know about the rest but I have found your information excallent, and as you say backed by 40 years expirience, an achievement to say the least, few manage to stay in buisness 1/10 of that,
Regards
Mark

Dan_the_Chemist
03-08-2017, 10:17 AM
There are analytics websites that look at various social media and bracket guesses on how much a person/brand is earning. They do this because they offer consulting, etc., to help boost those numbers. One I like to use is SocialBlade. Joe Pie's score on social blade can be seen at https://socialblade.com/youtube/channel/UCpp6lgdc_XO_FZYJppaFa5w

Their estimate is that Joe is grossing somewhere between $1.25 to $20 per day from YouTube, depending on the specific deals he has cut with the various advertisers, sponsors, and YouTube. I suspect it's on the lower end of that. That doesn't include editing (not that Joe spends much on studio time) and post processing. As a professional machinist Joe could earn a whole lot more than $1.25 to $20 for the amount of time he puts into scripting, making, and uploading those videos. Of course the videos could just be part of a larger marketing plan, and there are the long term residuals to be considered. If Joe stopped making videos tomorrow he'd still earn a couple of bucks a day for a few years as his popularity slowly decreased due to lack of new offerings. However, unless he has much bigger plans he isn't ever going to get rich offa YouTube. He's gotta be doing it for his own enjoyment.

One person who is doing fairly well on You Tube is Lyle Peterson, MrPete222 (tubalcain). https://socialblade.com/youtube/user/mrpete222 Social blade estimates that Peterson makes between $3 K to $50 K / year from his videos, and he has been advertising Machine Shop courses and other revenue streams. Mr Pete is a retired guy, so making videos does not take away time from making a professional salary. (In a way you can say that it costs Joe Pie to do his videos, since he is not making money while he is doing the vids). Mr Pete doesn't have to make this tradeoff, so anything he earns from YouTube is a nice bit of extra revenue for a retired shop teacher. He gets to have fun, keeps up his love of teaching, makes a few bucks on the side... GOOD ON YOU MR PETE !!!

Some YouTubers even earn enough to hire staff. This Old Tony has hired a young woman as a producer and has a sound man. Joy of Precision has doubled the number of his stage props, and now includes a bottle cap as well as a penny to show scale !!

Thanks to all the YouTube shop teachers for helping me learn how to improve my machining, and providing me with some fun and entertainment.

pinstripe
03-08-2017, 10:32 AM
Dave Jones did a video where he discusses his income from YouTube and compares it with the Social Blade estimates.



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R8qdOAEQnps

mars-red
03-08-2017, 02:36 PM
Hey Mark. I gotta say, you're wrong. I am very interested in not only announcing my channel to help you guys out, but I'd be happy to answer all your questions. I got 4 pages of replies in just 2 days, I'll try to check in regularly when I can. The answers given to the inquiries posted, have been good. No need to say the same thing. If I see someone all alone or getting bad advice, I'll offer my suggestion. As my channel and my inbox would reflect, I am a very active member of the online community with 40+ years of manufacturing experience to back it up. Take care.

Joe, I happened across your channel a while ago and really like the techniques you show in your videos. It's a shame so many don't realize the community that exists within YouTube, and what a valuable resource it is for so many others. I get the impression that it's often viewed as a somewhat selfish money-making attempt to start and promote a YouTube channel. The reality is that it takes not only a lot of passion and dedication for any individual to achieve financial independence (or even a reasonable amount of pocket money) through YouTube, but it usually takes many years as well. While I don't believe that YouTube is a platform that lends itself at all well to the sort of collaboration and communication that forums such as this one are tailor made for, at the same time it should be recognized that the various niches on YouTube enjoy a community spirit that is every bit as strong, and every bit as meaningful, just in different ways.

I think YouTube is a great platform to be a sort of gateway into this hobby, and all of the important craftsmanship and knowledge that the hobby helps to preserve. It's my hope, at least for my own channel, that it will reach and inspire people to get into the hobby through some other semi-relevant interest (or even through pure chance). Once someone becomes enamored with the idea of machining, I think that's when we're likely to see them show up in forums like ours.

Anyway, just my 2 cents.

mars-red
03-08-2017, 02:40 PM
Some YouTubers even earn enough to hire staff. This Old Tony has hired a young woman as a producer and has a sound man. Joy of Precision has doubled the number of his stage props, and now includes a bottle cap as well as a penny to show scale !!


LOL! Very well done, sir. Who knew that Mr. Fenner put himself through trade school as the "Moxie Guy" back in the day?? :)

Thanks for watching, Dan, having just a few people that genuinely get a kick out of our crazy projects and twisted senses of humor is really what makes it all worthwhile. It sure isn't the $0.002 per ad view, haha.

-JoP

Bob Engelhardt
03-09-2017, 10:32 AM
[snip]

Some YouTubers even earn enough to hire staff. This Old Tony has hired a young woman as a producer and has a sound man. ...


I'm skeptical. Tony has a good number of subscribers (107,000), but not the 400,000 of aVe. Nor does he have Patreon help (before they stopped showing it, aVe had $9,000 A MONTH!). Where did you see/hear that Tony has hired help?

mars-red
03-09-2017, 10:36 AM
I'm skeptical. Tony has a good number of subscribers (107,000), but not the 400,000 of aVe. Nor does he have Patreon help (before they stopped showing it, aVe had $9,000 A MONTH!). Where did you see/hear that Tony has hired help?

That was a joke, take a look at his 100k sub video. :)

Bob Engelhardt
03-09-2017, 11:06 AM
That was a joke, take a look at his 100k sub video. :)

Oh, yeah ... yeah. Cameos by his kids.

That's what emoticons are for - to help the more dense of us "get it".

Dan_the_Chemist
03-09-2017, 02:19 PM
Where did you see/hear that Tony has hired help?

This Old Tony put out a video 3 weeks ago in which he showed his staff at work.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vJIzkIc_wIU&t=94s

Here is a screen snip of his female producer and one of his sound man.

http://i.imgur.com/tEwCIM3.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/KEKZpUN.jpg

I think the labor relations board should investigate... I suspect nepotism.