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lynnl
03-08-2017, 10:14 AM
Are the heads on the 4" and 6" Starrett combo squares proportionately smaller than their 12" brethren?

I assume they are but can't find any confirmation on the Starrett site.

I have a 'sackfull' of 12 inchers (not all Starrett), but often times a smaller one would be handier.
But if the 6" head is the same as a 12" one I'll just cut one off to suit.

boslab
03-08-2017, 11:05 AM
My 4" was smaller, the big one I had, dunno if it was 18" or a bit less was bigger, I think there's a standard where the supporting flat of the square has to be a minimum size, I'm looking for a new combination set myself, haven't seen one I like yet.
Mark

BCRider
03-08-2017, 11:15 AM
Easy as looking at a picture....

http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=57065&cat=1,42936

If you want a better idea of the size when I googled for "starrett combination squares" then clicked on "images" a number of the images are fairly direct side on shots which you could use the ruler in the picture to "measure" the length and width of the heads. They won't be dead on but you'd get a close idea of the size of them.

lynnl
03-08-2017, 12:49 PM
I figured they are proportionate. An 18" one I have is noticeably bigger than the 12" heads.

That Lee Valley picture is the first I've seen showing different sizes together. Thanks BC.

gvasale
03-08-2017, 12:55 PM
I'll go out on a limb here, having owned the 6" and 12" sets. They are different. Once you go to the 12" size, the blade length is the only difference. I have 12" and 36" blades. My 6" was lightfingered away some time ago.

Paul Alciatore
03-08-2017, 02:50 PM
I have a Starrett 12" and about six or eight additional adjustable squares as well as several fixed ones. I love being able to find the right one for the job at hand. And I often use two, three, or even more on a single task. It can be very helpful to have a square set for a dimension that will be used several times while laying out one part. I set them using the digital calipers and know I have an accurate dimension. This can make layout work go a lot faster. Other times one square is used to position a second one for scribing a line.

Many worry about the accuracy of a square, as they should. In my assortment I have checked the accuracy of most of the ones I have and have found that there is little correlation between the cost or name brand ID and the accuracy. I am not sure which of my squares is the absolute best, you can assume it is the Starrett if you like. But I do know that the worst one I have is an older, name brand that I probably purchased in a hardware store. I have several that are imports, two of them are the inexpensive Chinese models that have been widely sold and one that I obtained as a bonus gift with a large order (mill). These import squares have all tested OK with one exception that was so far off that it had to be a production error. I trash canned the head of that one. I am not trying to talk anyone out of getting a name brand. I am just saying that good squares can be had at reasonable prices.

One that I really like is a 24", Pittsburgh brand that I purchased at HF about a year ago. It is accurate with a good 90 degree angle and a nicely made, SS rule. All the scales on the rule (inch and metric) are properly aligned with the ends of the rule and they are easy to read. The head is aluminum so there is going to be no problem with rust. It is my go-to square for larger work. And it has a head that is about the same size as all my 12" squares. It may not be on a level with my Starrett in terms of finish, but I believe it is every bit as good in a functional manner. To be fair, the Starrett has finer divisions (64ths and 100ths): that was one of the reasons why I bought it. But the Starrett is made from steel and CI so rust is a big concern, especially here in South Texas and close to the Gulf (salt spray). At least one of my older, name brand squares (40-50 years old) does have a moderate amount of rust damage.

JRouche
03-08-2017, 03:03 PM
Are the heads on the 4" and 6" Starrett combo squares proportionately smaller than their 12" brethren?

Here are my 3" and 18". Solly, no 4, 6 or 12 in Starrett.. JR

http://i1183.photobucket.com/albums/x461/_GLE_/HSM/combo_zps9wdz2b0j.jpg (http://s1183.photobucket.com/user/_GLE_/media/HSM/combo_zps9wdz2b0j.jpg.html)

Paul Alciatore
03-08-2017, 03:16 PM
I guess I forgot the reason for my book above. I meant to say that with a fairly extensive collection of adjustable squares, I also have observed that the sizes are proportional for the sizes up to 12" and then they seem to stay the same. All my 12" squares, an 18" one, and a 24" one all have heads that are about the same size. The differences are minor and not necessarily related to the size of the blade.




I'll go out on a limb here, having owned the 6" and 12" sets. They are different. Once you go to the 12" size, the blade length is the only difference. I have 12" and 36" blades. My 6" was lightfingered away some time ago.

rklopp
03-08-2017, 04:01 PM
Watch out there are two different size Starrett 6-inch combination squares. That is how I ended up with both. I had a rule, bought the wrong head, so had to buy the new head a rule and the old rule a head.

Dan Dubeau
03-08-2017, 04:19 PM
A good source for PEC heads and rules is https://www.harryepstein.com/index.php/tools-for-the-trade/machinist-s.html

Not as nice* as an old starrett, but then again, not as expensive either.

*my only gripe with my PEC stuff (I've got a few) is the locking screw for the rules is kinda crappy. But that's my gripe with a lot of new tools is that the knurls and locking knobs are all crappy.

Paul Alciatore
03-08-2017, 04:40 PM
Yes, I think I also made that mistake while buying a square for work once. And Starrett and their distributors do not go to any great effort to inform the buyers of this.




Watch out there are two different size Starrett 6-inch combination squares. That is how I ended up with both. I had a rule, bought the wrong head, so had to buy the new head a rule and the old rule a head.