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DICKEYBIRD
03-12-2017, 10:51 AM
Just a quick reminder of forgetting the (duh!) simple stuff can cause unexpected results.

As mentioned in another thread, oil-quenching O-1 stock was done on a couple punches. A plastic film canister (remember those?) was used as a reusable container for the ATF. Seemed like such a great idea; an easily stored, no spill container for quenching small parts…NOT!

It worked perfectly on the 1st punch made from ¼” stock. 3/8”? Not so much….

http://i57.photobucket.com/albums/g227/DBAviation/Melted%20Canister_zpsrv0bnbqn.jpg (http://s57.photobucket.com/user/DBAviation/media/Melted%20Canister_zpsrv0bnbqn.jpg.html)

vpt
03-12-2017, 11:00 AM
This guy uses a bag...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8_vC_B0BMm8

tlfamm
03-12-2017, 11:03 AM
The previous generation film canisters (< 1975?) might have been a better bet: aluminum body and steel (galvanized?) screw cap.

Mcgyver
03-12-2017, 12:18 PM
tobacco tin (no i don't smoke) works well as it has a lid and wide brim.

Zahnrad Kopf
03-12-2017, 12:54 PM
I use a 5 gallon steel bucket with locking lid and perf steel basket within. Plastic anything is desiring failure.

ken
03-12-2017, 01:09 PM
Buddy did that but he had a 5 gal plastic bucket with a smaller metal container inside with quenching oil in it maybe 2-3 gallons. But he had a few things to harden first few wet fine then the oil got hot and lit off he put the lid on the bucket it slowed the fire down but not for long as the plastic caught fire but long enough to get the fire extinguisher he almost burnt his shop and house down Ken

mattthemuppet
03-12-2017, 01:14 PM
A jAm jar works well

BCRider
03-12-2017, 01:23 PM
Part of the issue is for the oil to have enough mass that it won't heat up too much. So I hate to say it but a film canister would only be enough volume of oil to get away with doing something really small before it over heated. And apparently you found the magic combination.

I used an old jam jar for ages. But then I worried about the risk of it shattering. When I was at a paint store one time I saw empty cans I could buy. I picked up a few quart size cans and they've proven to be extremely handy for a couple of jobs such as keeping my quench oil. And the amount is larger so I don't need to worry about the oil over heating. I think they charged me a buck each.

DICKEYBIRD
03-12-2017, 01:56 PM
:o Kinda embarrassing, huh. I probably have at least 5 or 10 suitable empty tins around the shop but something told me this was such a great idea.:rolleyes:

vpt
03-12-2017, 08:53 PM
Coffee cans?

Willy
03-12-2017, 09:12 PM
:o Kinda embarrassing, huh. I probably have at least 5 or 10 suitable empty tins around the shop but something told me this was such a great idea.:rolleyes:


Anyone here that won't admit to at one point in time using a styrofoam cup for gasoline is a liar. :)

BCRider
03-12-2017, 09:19 PM
Anyone here that won't admit to at one point in time using a styrofoam cup for gasoline is a liar. :)

EGGZACTLY.... If we're laughing it's only because we've got stories of our own equally as embarrassing that your film container is reminding us of.

alanganes
03-12-2017, 10:29 PM
I like paint cans for quench oil. If you clean them out, the lids seal well, and being metal they don't melt or catch on fire.

quasi
03-12-2017, 10:37 PM
ATF for quenching oil?

BCRider
03-12-2017, 10:45 PM
I like paint cans for quench oil. If you clean them out, the lids seal well, and being metal they don't melt or catch on fire.

Not worth trying to clean them out when I can by "virgin" cans for a buck each. The big box outlets may not have them but the "proper" paint stores stock them in droves.

BCRider
03-12-2017, 10:47 PM
ATF for quenching oil?

Sure, the basic reason for using oil is that it does not turn to steam like water does. So it soaks away the heat a little slower than water.

Is ATF the perfect quench oil? That's another question. But there's no reason why it isn't usable.

achtanelion
03-12-2017, 11:01 PM
Anyone here that won't admit to at one point in time using a styrofoam cup for gasoline is a liar. :)

Nope, and not a liar either. We used to add styro to gas to jelly it so we could paint it on things.

On the other hand, there was the plastic cup full of RC nitro fuel. I couldn't figure out why the cup was melting, since the fuel hadn't caught. And that's how I learned about clear flames.

Willy
03-12-2017, 11:13 PM
Yup alcohol flames, same color temperature as daylight.
Another painful lesson from my youth.:o

BCRider
03-13-2017, 01:48 AM
Model airplane fuel all over the front end of the model from filling them priming the engine. The only way I knew the fuel had caught and started burning outside of the engine was either my hand got warm in a hurry or the dope and tissue started disappearing rapidly before my eyes with a little black line around the rapidly growing opening...

Lew Hartswick
03-13-2017, 08:18 AM
Anyone here that won't admit to at one point in time using a styrofoam cup for gasoline is a liar. :)

. :-)
My dad admitted to it a long time ago so I haven't tried it
...lew...

HWooldridge
03-13-2017, 08:20 AM
I have 5 gallons of Texaco Quenchtex A in an old galvanized milk can. Works great because I can flip the lid over if there is a flash and immediately douse the flames. I bought it about 30 years ago and still good as new.

RichR
03-13-2017, 09:59 AM
Anyone here that won't admit to at one point in time using a styrofoam cup for gasoline is a liar. :)

Never tried that. When I was 15 I tried etching my first circuit board. I placed the circuit board and ferric chloride in an aluminum pie pan. After
a minute or two I decided there was way too much fizzing going on in the pan. I picked up the pan, ran down the stairs, through the kitchen
past my surprised mother, and out the back door. The bottom fell out of the pan just as I got to the driveway.

vpt
03-13-2017, 10:41 AM
Putting gas in a plastic cup on top of a fire (log) and waiting was a favorite past time.

Toolguy
03-13-2017, 10:57 AM
I have 5 gallons of quenching oil in an aluminum turkey fryer pot with a stainless wire basket. It has a flat lid that is on most of the time to keep dirt out. Picked it up at a yard sale for $20 with burner. I use the burner to melt and alloy lead.

BCRider
03-13-2017, 04:58 PM
Never tried that. When I was 15 I tried etching my first circuit board. I placed the circuit board and ferric chloride in an aluminum pie pan. After
a minute or two I decided there was way too much fizzing going on in the pan. I picked up the pan, ran down the stairs, through the kitchen
past my surprised mother, and out the back door. The bottom fell out of the pan just as I got to the driveway.

Nice catch! ! ! ! :D

I worked at a place that made marine SSB radios for a couple of years back in my youth. My main job was the circuit board shop. Yeah, Ferric Chloride and aluminium REALLY do not like each other....

Alistair Hosie
03-14-2017, 01:27 PM
Number one lesson on safe containers see the series ( breaking bad) that is some education to be had. Alistair

Wirecutter
03-16-2017, 12:05 PM
Never tried that. When I was 15 I tried etching my first circuit board. I placed the circuit board and ferric chloride in an aluminum pie pan. After
a minute or two I decided there was way too much fizzing going on in the pan. I picked up the pan, ran down the stairs, through the kitchen
past my surprised mother, and out the back door. The bottom fell out of the pan just as I got to the driveway.

Second that - excellent save.

Re: quenching - While in Taipei, Taiwan years ago, I visited "Machine Shop Alley". It's a part of the city that seems to contain all the small machine shops. There were many shapers in operation, to my surprise, and dozens of shops specializing in one thing or another. One old wiry guy was working in a little shack that would probably have fit in the bed of a full-size pickup truck. He was making the tool bits for those pneumatic hammers used to bust up sidewalks. The guy must have been in his 70's, but he worked quickly and had obviously been doing it for a long time. Using tongs, he'd stick a blank in a blower-fed fireplace, then remove one that had been soaking there. Then he'd pivot over to a motor-driven hammer, step on a pedal, and whack the red hot blank into the desired shape. Lastly, he'd quench the part in a 5 gallon bucket of water, then throw the result in a pile of finished bits. What caught my attention was when he lit a cigarette from one of the bits after removing it from the water.
-M

alanganes
03-20-2017, 07:02 PM
Not worth trying to clean them out when I can by "virgin" cans for a buck each. The big box outlets may not have them but the "proper" paint stores stock them in droves.

Ha! It never occurred to me to try buying a new can. I had a couple that Had latex paint in them that we had gone through in one use. So they were clean enough that I just sprayed them out with a hose, which got it plenty clean for my purposes. If I ever need replacements I'll hit up the paint store. Sometimes great ideas are the obvious ones.

Thanks!


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