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View Full Version : The most pristine Myford Super 7 on the planet? - on CL



tlfamm
03-12-2017, 01:52 PM
Listed at a mere $7200:

https://baltimore.craigslist.org/tls/6027031691.html

https://images.craigslist.org/00s0s_kkrs7per2wL_600x450.jpg

flylo
03-12-2017, 03:00 PM
I can't believe after all the "experts" have dissed Atlas as junk for having flat ways that a fine machine like this has them also:o

dave_r
03-12-2017, 03:09 PM
I would have to smear dirty oil on it just to make it not the brightest, shiniest thing in my garage.

Magicniner
03-12-2017, 03:21 PM
From the look of the garish colour it's the "Big Bore" version but you should get a very good Harrison 300 for that much!

boslab
03-12-2017, 03:30 PM
I've had 2 of them, one brand new, a ml10, first lathe I had, then a super 7 tri lever, donated by hawker siddleys when they got a new WARCO for facing samples from the foundry, neither were brilliant, just so so, an old Harrison 12" is my current beast, it's like chalk and cheese, the Harrison cost less, can take a heavier cut, even worn it can hold its own against any myford, fact is I think it's a little more accurate.
Myford were always a bit over rated imho, popular mainly for the size and plug and play.
The ml10 got stolen as its carry able I'm going for a DSG with at least 120 inch bed, carry that ya bstrds
I do like teal as a colour for bedrooms, lathes are grey, like battleships, I've seen gold ones, you wouldent paint the Missuri teal unless you wanted to hide it in beds, baths and beyond.
Machines are grey, any shade but grey, sorry Norm no green allowed.
Mark

The Artful Bodger
03-12-2017, 03:40 PM
Run a mile! Every Myford I have ever seen has been an import..:mad:

loose nut
03-12-2017, 03:55 PM
$7500 almost half the new price, no wonder they went out of business.

livesteam
03-12-2017, 04:13 PM
I bought a new (Grey) Super7 in 1971 from a shop near Philadelphia with motor, 3 jaw and 4 jaw chucks for $1035.
It is a light duty lathe, but for most things I do, live steam, etc, it's perfect. I use the SB 9" for the heavier tasks.
RichD, Canton, Ga

Magicniner
03-12-2017, 04:27 PM
Myford Ltd should buy it, they have nothing to sell that they don't buy in and tart up these days.

J Tiers
03-12-2017, 04:36 PM
I can't believe after all the "experts" have dissed Atlas as junk for having flat ways that a fine machine like this has them also:o

Nobody but a d@m fool disses flat ways.

What is wrong with flat ways?

The only thing wrong with flat ways is that Atlas used them. That alone will set off the "internet experts". I don't care much for Atlas, but it has NOTHING to do with flat ways.

tlfamm
03-12-2017, 04:49 PM
...
I do like teal as a colour for bedrooms, lathes are grey, like battleships, I've seen gold ones, you wouldent paint the Missuri teal unless you wanted to hide it in beds, baths and beyond.
Machines are grey, any shade but grey, sorry Norm no green allowed.
Mark

The Myford is clearly British Racing Teal - a whole 'nother shade.

:)

Mcgyver
03-12-2017, 05:00 PM
On the colour....I wonder if its a white balance issue? I've not seen one that colour, its rather horrid. Green and grey is how i've seen them. As anyone who's every had one knows, they are fantastic little lathe, made and finished to high standards. While high, if I was after one, the price wouldn't necessarily scare me off give how pristine it looks, but the lack of tooling/accessories would.

boslab
03-12-2017, 05:27 PM
I agree, only toy lathes are flat beded, this is a rebadged myford super 7, honest
https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=craven+lathe+bed&rlz=1C9BKJA_enGB605GB605&hl=en-GB&prmd=isvn&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjv8KLH89HSAhXlI8AKHR4eCNYQ_AUIBygB&biw=1024&bih=653#imgrc=aX2Sml8FIuOHAM:
Mark

Andre3127
03-12-2017, 06:12 PM
I can't believe after all the "experts" have dissed Atlas as junk for having flat ways that a fine machine like this has them also:o
All the experts agree those lathes are very easy to rebuild by scraping or grinding. Very simple geometry.

The experts also say they're very cheaply made and, well, cheap. I tend to agree, although I'm sure they can do just fine work they don't give you that feeling of a quality robust machine.

Sent from my XT1053 using Tapatalk

Magicniner
03-12-2017, 06:17 PM
On the colour....I wonder if its a white balance issue?

Nope, that's the colour that Myford chose for the new Big Bore models, foul isn't it?
:D

Mcgyver
03-12-2017, 07:32 PM
indeed.... the ad says 2002, that had to be long before the new offshore "Myfords"? Wonder what possessed them

flylo
03-13-2017, 04:36 AM
I like the color, reminds me of late '50s chevys. 1955s my favotite. They make a Glock almost that color.

Daveb
03-13-2017, 07:01 AM
Myford's had a few different colours over the years, in the 80s they would paint it whatever colour you wanted, the bright orange ones were particularly fetching. I've always preferred grey for machinery, just looks right to me. Dave

boslab
03-13-2017, 08:21 AM
Myford's had a few different colours over the years, in the 80s they would paint it whatever colour you wanted, the bright orange ones were particularly fetching. I've always preferred grey for machinery, just looks right to me. Dave
You have my deepest respect, I would pass laws to ensure the continued presence of grey oily machinery, I would call it "statutory grey", prison for those who defile iron with blue and those with green machines would get the choice of deportation or castration or painting bridges grey.
Mark

tlfamm
03-13-2017, 08:34 AM
--> statutory grey <--


<snort>

loose nut
03-13-2017, 08:52 AM
You have my deepest respect, I would pass laws to ensure the continued presence of grey oily machinery, I would call it "statutory grey", prison for those who defile iron with blue and those with green machines would get the choice of deportation, castration or painting bridges grey.
Mark

Statutory grey, is that what you get for painting a lathe that is less then 18 years old?

cameron
03-13-2017, 09:25 AM
Never mind the colour (or color if you're spelling challenged), I'd like to hear one of the Vee-way nutters try give us a cogent argument for the inherent inferiority of flat beds.

J Tiers
03-13-2017, 09:36 AM
I also prefer geay.

But there is a particular shade of green that Germans paint machines.... I don't mind that at all. It's the ONE color other than gray that looks decent. Every other shade, and especially every other shade of green, is anathema.

That blue-teal color belongs on a Corvair.


Never mind the colour (or color if you're spelling challenged), I'd like to hear one of the Vee-way nutters try give us a cogent argument for the inherent inferiority of flat beds.

They MUST be bad.... Atlas used them. 'Nuff said, yes?

Goes with the lies of politicians, if you say it enough it becomes true.

becksmachine
03-13-2017, 12:22 PM
Never mind the colour (or color if you're spelling challenged), I'd like to hear one of the Vee-way nutters try give us a cogent argument for the inherent inferiority of flat beds.

Ok, I will bite. :)

Flat ways are fine as long as they are in good shape, and by good shape I mean flat and straight within some number of "tenths" over the full length of the carriage and/or
tailstock travel, on top, bottom and sides.

Now, an example to put this statement into some perspective. Some of the folks here might know that I am partial to Lodge & Shipley lathes, I have 3 of them in various sizes, and states of repair. Some folks may also know that L & S made a number of lathes with ways that had an essentially "flat" configuration, the latest of these used the much touted X style headstock, which by itself was an engineering wonder. The X Head was also used on lathes with prismatic ways, and many of this style are still in use today. From the factory, both of these styles were some of the finest lathes available at the time, but upon delivery, the flat way versions immediately started turning into an unredeemable POS.

It is a rarity to find one like that in use today for anything but weld prep as the most minor wear, especially on the sides of the guide way, allows the carriage to tip, turn and twist to varying degrees depending on feed rate, depth of cut and position on the more or less worn portion of the bed. Given the height of the toolpost above the ways, .001" worth of wear translates to .005"- .010" change in turned diameter. In contrast, the L & S Poweturn was last made sometime in the 1980s or 90s and hundreds if not thousands are still in demand today, other factors influence this, but all Powerturns that I am aware of use 2 V ways for carriage travel and a morphodite v way with a flat way for the tailstock.

Which is not to say that prismatic ways are immune to the whims and wear that happen to all machine tools, lathes in this case. However, even with significant wear, the prismatic or V way configuration will at least allow for the possibility of relatively straight travel in the horizontal plane which largely determines the straightness of the toolpath for a lathe. Adjusting hold downs on the underside of the ways is as much an exercise in futility on a worn v way machine as it is on a machine with worn flat ways. If they are snug at the chuck end, it becomes impossible to move the carriage at the tailstock end. The difference being that the v way machine will still cut a relatively straight shaft over the full length of the bed, even with no hold downs present, whereas a flat way configuration becomes unusable for anything for anything but the shortest fits, as it is impossible to adjust the gib on the side of the way for a consistent fit.

Dave

J Tiers
03-13-2017, 04:50 PM
That seems to be the long way of saying that wear on a v-way may let the carriage drop some, but does not allow AS MUCH variation from side to side.

Of course there WILL be some side movement, since the pressure of the cut makes the wear come slightly more on the rear-facing surfaces of the v-way. Just not as much as with a small box way. But a larger box way will have proportionally less issue with wear.

Must work OK, sure are a lot of BIG machines with box ways.

becksmachine
03-13-2017, 05:40 PM
Of course there WILL be some side movement, since the pressure of the cut makes the wear come slightly more on the rear-facing surfaces of the v-way. Just not as much as with a small box way. But a larger box way will have proportionally less issue with wear.

Must work OK, sure are a lot of BIG machines with box ways.



That seems to be the long way of saying that wear on a v-way may let the carriage drop some, but does not allow AS MUCH variation from side to side.


Hah!

Here we have the pot calling the pan sooty. :)

Yes, that is essentially the message here.

Agreed, that there are many largish machine tools that use box ways, especially large (and small) CNC mills and machining centers. The key here is that they are usually somehow lubricated by some means that exceeds the sophistication of the standard "oil can in one hand, wiping rag in the hip pocket" system. If that can be called a system. Which is very often missing one or both parts, and I can honestly say that in all the years of working in various establishments, I cannot remember ever seeing a shop foreman's schedule that listed "Get Fred to completely clean the ways on the Niles, repair and/or replace worn or missing way wipers on carriage and tailstock, refill the carriage lubrication system" or equivalent, listed as a regularly scheduled event.

Now this may well be a comment on the types of institutions that would have allowed me to cast my shadow on their time clock on a daily basis, or why I have been self employed for the past 30 years, I will leave it to the reader to judge.

:)

Dave

J Tiers
03-13-2017, 05:49 PM
Eh...

I've seen a few larger machines with wear on the V ways... LOTS of wear. I saw a pretty big SB (15" or maybe a bit bigger, Sb only wen to what 18"?) once that you could just about catch a crane hook on the "ridge" along the V ways. I mention SB specifically, only because SB was notorious for developing a "wear ridge".

flylo
03-13-2017, 06:30 PM
I think hardened ways are more important than shape IMHO.

loose nut
03-13-2017, 07:16 PM
Never mind the colour (or color if you're spelling challenged), I'd like to hear one of the Vee-way nutters try give us a cogent argument for the inherent inferiority of flat beds.

Color is the American spelling, Colour is the proper spelling.

Nothing wrong with "hardened" flat ways if used and maintained properly. The effects of wear are more pronounced though compared to vee ways.

Alistair Hosie
03-13-2017, 08:19 PM
I have never been able to understand what actually happened to Myford as a company? As I understand it they were neither in debt or heading that way, they were very popular worldwide indeed , and probably had a very good long term thriving future. Albeit not a big name like (Rolls Royce) etc were in lathe terms quite well up there. I never heard anyone speak the name Myford lathes in any way but very positive.
So why give in?
It could not have simply old age! as this surely must have been a very viable business which would have been highly sought after world wide. Please scratch my head for me will you as I am just too dumfounded.
At the end of the day it had to be money which was at the route of it's almost instant and surprising closure.
Or am I wrong? Alistair

loose nut
03-13-2017, 10:31 PM
The lathe sales were not what they had been (a good but old design and very expensive compared to the Asian competition) and Myford had taken to rebuilding older lathes to cut costs. The company was still clicking along but not making a great deal of money so when the owner died the next guy in charge took the opportunity to shut it down, one week later and sell out for what ever he could get. Apparently the company that bought them out is selling crap under the Myford name. Anyone know for sure.

ulav8r
03-13-2017, 11:47 PM
mis
You have my deepest respect, I would pass laws to ensure the continued presence of grey oily machinery, I would call it "statutory grey", prison for those who defile iron with blue and those with green machines would get the choice of deportation and castration and painting bridges grey.
Mark

boslab
03-14-2017, 03:32 AM
I bow to your reasoning that the illiterate gene is present, OR seems like a viable alternative.
Thanks
Mark

Mark Rand
03-14-2017, 06:07 AM
I had the chop 7 months before our youngest was born, but I haven't been deported yet. This was actually inspired by Macona's beutiful red 10EE:-

http://www.test-net.com/work-in-progress.jpg

flylo
03-14-2017, 07:37 AM
I like color on machines, makes it much easier to see gry chip than on gray machines & adds some life to the shop. When I get around to painting the pacemaker as it came out of Checker Cab it has to be Taxi cab yellow with black checkers (squares) like a Taxi. The 1st car I saw that went 1 million miles was a Checker Taxi in NYC.

Magicniner
03-14-2017, 08:09 AM
This is a video of my 30.5mm bore Super 7 cutting 30mm OD 304 stainless-

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pUI2GIGTz_c

- Nick

Lew Hartswick
03-14-2017, 08:13 AM
The Myford is clearly British Racing Teal - a whole 'nother shade.

:)There is no such thing as British Racing Teal. The only color associated with British Racing is a fairly dark GREEN as in all the Jaguars and F1 cars that raced for so many years. :-)
...lew...

Magicniner
03-14-2017, 08:24 AM
As a Yorkshireman I prefer British Racing Puce ;-)

vpt
03-14-2017, 09:29 AM
Box ways matter!

thaiguzzi
03-14-2017, 09:33 AM
You have my deepest respect, I would pass laws to ensure the continued presence of grey oily machinery, I would call it "statutory grey", prison for those who defile iron with blue and those with green machines would get the choice of deportation or castration or painting bridges grey.
Mark

LOL. And i agree...

tlfamm
03-14-2017, 09:36 AM
Lew,

the smiley in my post was meant to indicate sarcasm.

But, maybe there ought to be a British Racing Teal.

:)

J Tiers
03-14-2017, 11:40 AM
I suppose V ways have the advantage that the swarf tends not to accumulate on top of them, it slides off if it does not stick to the remains of the oil coating from last month's oiling.


....
Agreed, that there are many largish machine tools that use box ways, especially large (and small) CNC mills and machining centers. The key here is that they are usually somehow lubricated by some means that exceeds the sophistication of the standard "oil can in one hand, wiping rag in the hip pocket" system. If that can be called a system. Which is very often missing one or both parts,.....
Dave

With small home hobby machines, there is often NO provision for oiling whatever. And no wipers, since they wore out years ago, and "home shop Harry" has not seen fit to fix that, if he even knows. Oil can only get under the carriage if it is slopped onto the (dirty) ways, and gets wiped under the carriage along with abrasive swarf, grit, dust, and whatever else is laying on the ways.

The result is a thick, sticky "gray paste" that gets smeared back and forth over the ways as the carriage moves. No doubt part of the color is supplied by the worn-off cast iron coming from the ways. And from the pulverized swarf that has been dragged back and forth a few dozen times, breaking it up gradually into a fine powder.

No idea what Myfords provided, but years ago I added lube points directed under the carriage, to the Logan. With clean oil supplied from INSIDE the wipers, the gray paste was gone in a day, and has not returned.

EDIT: I see the ML7 at least had oil Zerks on top and front face of carriage.

Magicniner
03-14-2017, 12:49 PM
No idea what Myfords provided,

Myford provided multiple oiling points on almost everything with nipples for an oil gun on most, oil cups on the rest, and a manual giving details of oils required and frequency recommended.

Alistair Hosie
03-14-2017, 01:12 PM
Someone here said it ! Asian imports ,offered you everything but a free years supply of metal. Myford became just too expensive, with none of the Asian frills and tassels. I would rather buy used that's me good used is much better than anything else you can get a very expensive good condition lathe for a fraction of the new price. I bought a first rate Smart and brown VSL yes variable speed lathe with a load of accessories inc a four jaw scroll chuck as well as a four jaw independent a three jaw scroll faceplates carriers etc etc both steadies ..It had hardly been used by Oxford university cost then new 27.000.00 bare that's right twenty seven thousand bare .
I paid including delivery 1200,. I even went down to the Welsh borders by train stayed in the guys house overnight. First we all had supper and we both drove the truck home to my house early start the following morning , and George the salesman was a real gentleman. Off course he staid in my home overnight and went home the next day all through the mountains and lochs beautiful country It is just the best. But if I could not buy used I would have saved up and bought Asian. There was a guy on the television on a show where they took old machinery ,including army tanks, street cars, etc and made them like new. I used to enjoy watching that. On one episode he went out and bought one of the yellow orange ones without extras 15.000.00 it almost fitted in his estate car. I like Myford but they are too small and too pricey. The Boxford made a lot more sense was always cheaper to buy and had a bigger turn capacity. and yet Myford was the sexier looking and sold a kind of status symbol in my humble opinion. love you guys Alistair

J Tiers
03-14-2017, 01:47 PM
Myford provided multiple oiling points on almost everything with nipples for an oil gun on most, oil cups on the rest, and a manual giving details of oils required and frequency recommended.

Saw the oiling points when I looked up Myfords on the UK site... see edit above. Thanks though.

I'd HOPE for a new price north of 5 grand for a tiny lathe, that the thing would have better oiling than a Jet or HF 7 x 12.

Magicniner
03-14-2017, 02:59 PM
The last time Myfords were worth the prices expected by most sellers was in the 1980s when I bought mine.

Smaller lathes can have advantages as well as disadvantages, the early Myford Mini-Kop hydraulic copy lathes ran the standard 7 bearings at up to 4300rpm, something you can do with a Super 7 in good condition with the right VFD/3 phase motor combination.

With 30.5mm through capacity and over 3000rpm top speed the custom made big bore head fitted to my Super 7 gives me the best of both worlds when combined with the 31" between centres and greater rigidity of the long bed, it was slated to go until the posh head turned up.

Mark Rand
03-14-2017, 03:59 PM
With 30.5mm through capacity and over 3000rpm top speed the custom made big bore head fitted to my Super 7 gives me the best of both worlds when combined with the 31" between centres and greater rigidity of the long bed, it was slated to go until the posh head turned up.

Not the Myford 'big bore' head?

Pictures needed...

rklopp
03-14-2017, 04:36 PM
It is a light duty lathe, but for most things I do, live steam, etc, it's perfect. I use the SB 9" for the heavier tasks.
RichD, Canton, Ga
:confused: If the SB 9" is the lathe for heavier tasks, the Myford must be made of jello! I always thought my Dad's SB 9" was rather rubbery, frankly. You need to try a Monarch 10EE or Colchester Chipmaster.

Magicniner
03-14-2017, 05:31 PM
Not the Myford 'big bore' head?

No, the capacity of the Myford job was still a bit small for my needs.

http://i135.photobucket.com/albums/q158/magicniner/30mm%20Stainless_zpsby4riale.jpg

This one has a native ER40 spindle nose with a register behind the ER40 thread allowing the use of collets and collet nuts or back-plates and chucks

J Tiers
03-14-2017, 07:01 PM
Lew,

...

But, maybe there ought to be a British Racing Teal.

:)

Dunno. They'd have to import them, plus, they could be rather hard to see. They would require training to follow the course and I don't know if they CAN be trained ....... :eek: